added actual ikev2bis draft
authorMartin Willi <martin@strongswan.org>
Fri, 5 Dec 2008 09:41:20 +0000 (09:41 -0000)
committerMartin Willi <martin@strongswan.org>
Fri, 5 Dec 2008 09:41:20 +0000 (09:41 -0000)
doc/standards/draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-01.txt [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/doc/standards/draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-01.txt b/doc/standards/draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-01.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..5751593
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,7504 @@
+
+
+
+Network Working Group                                         C. Kaufman
+Internet-Draft                                                 Microsoft
+Obsoletes: 4306, 4718                                         P. Hoffman
+(if approved)                                             VPN Consortium
+Intended status: Standards Track                                  Y. Nir
+Expires: May 3, 2009                                         Check Point
+                                                               P. Eronen
+                                                                   Nokia
+                                                        October 30, 2008
+
+
+                 Internet Key Exchange Protocol: IKEv2
+                     draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-01
+
+Status of this Memo
+
+   By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any
+   applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is aware
+   have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she becomes
+   aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of BCP 79.
+
+   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
+   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
+   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
+   Drafts.
+
+   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
+   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
+   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
+   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
+
+   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
+   http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt.
+
+   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
+   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.
+
+   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 3, 2009.
+
+Copyright Notice
+
+   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2008).
+
+Abstract
+
+   This document describes version 2 of the Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
+   protocol.  IKE is a component of IPsec used for performing mutual
+   authentication and establishing and maintaining security associations
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 1]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   (SAs).  It replaces and updates RFC 4306, and includes all of the
+   clarifications from RFC 4718.
+
+
+Table of Contents
+
+   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
+     1.1.  Usage Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
+       1.1.1.  Security Gateway to Security Gateway Tunnel Mode  . .   6
+       1.1.2.  Endpoint-to-Endpoint Transport Mode . . . . . . . . .   7
+       1.1.3.  Endpoint to Security Gateway Tunnel Mode  . . . . . .   8
+       1.1.4.  Other Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
+     1.2.  The Initial Exchanges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
+     1.3.  The CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
+       1.3.1.  Creating New Child SAs with the CREATE_CHILD_SA
+               Exchange  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
+       1.3.2.  Rekeying IKE SAs with the CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange  .  14
+       1.3.3.  Rekeying Child SAs with the CREATE_CHILD_SA
+               Exchange  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
+     1.4.  The INFORMATIONAL Exchange  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
+       1.4.1.  Deleting an SA with INFORMATIONAL Exchanges . . . . .  16
+     1.5.  Informational Messages outside of an IKE SA . . . . . . .  17
+     1.6.  Requirements Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18
+     1.7.  Differences Between RFC 4306 and This Document  . . . . .  18
+   2.  IKE Protocol Details and Variations . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20
+     2.1.  Use of Retransmission Timers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21
+     2.2.  Use of Sequence Numbers for Message ID  . . . . . . . . .  22
+     2.3.  Window Size for Overlapping Requests  . . . . . . . . . .  22
+     2.4.  State Synchronization and Connection Timeouts . . . . . .  24
+     2.5.  Version Numbers and Forward Compatibility . . . . . . . .  26
+     2.6.  IKE SA SPIs and Cookies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  28
+       2.6.1.  Interaction of COOKIE and INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD  . . . .  30
+     2.7.  Cryptographic Algorithm Negotiation . . . . . . . . . . .  31
+     2.8.  Rekeying  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  32
+       2.8.1.  Simultaneous Child SA rekeying  . . . . . . . . . . .  34
+       2.8.2.  Rekeying the IKE SA Versus Reauthentication . . . . .  36
+     2.9.  Traffic Selector Negotiation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  37
+       2.9.1.  Traffic Selectors Violating Own Policy  . . . . . . .  40
+     2.10. Nonces  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  40
+     2.11. Address and Port Agility  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  41
+     2.12. Reuse of Diffie-Hellman Exponentials  . . . . . . . . . .  41
+     2.13. Generating Keying Material  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  42
+     2.14. Generating Keying Material for the IKE SA . . . . . . . .  43
+     2.15. Authentication of the IKE SA  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  44
+     2.16. Extensible Authentication Protocol Methods  . . . . . . .  46
+     2.17. Generating Keying Material for Child SAs  . . . . . . . .  48
+     2.18. Rekeying IKE SAs Using a CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange . . . .  49
+     2.19. Requesting an Internal Address on a Remote Network  . . .  50
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 2]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+       2.19.1. Configuration Payloads  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  51
+     2.20. Requesting the Peer's Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  53
+     2.21. Error Handling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  53
+     2.22. IPComp  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  54
+     2.23. NAT Traversal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  55
+     2.24. Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN)  . . . . . . . . .  59
+   3.  Header and Payload Formats  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  59
+     3.1.  The IKE Header  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  59
+     3.2.  Generic Payload Header  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  62
+     3.3.  Security Association Payload  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  64
+       3.3.1.  Proposal Substructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  66
+       3.3.2.  Transform Substructure  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  68
+       3.3.3.  Valid Transform Types by Protocol . . . . . . . . . .  71
+       3.3.4.  Mandatory Transform IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  71
+       3.3.5.  Transform Attributes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  72
+       3.3.6.  Attribute Negotiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  74
+     3.4.  Key Exchange Payload  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  75
+     3.5.  Identification Payloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  75
+     3.6.  Certificate Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  78
+     3.7.  Certificate Request Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  80
+     3.8.  Authentication Payload  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  82
+     3.9.  Nonce Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  83
+     3.10. Notify Payload  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  84
+       3.10.1. Notify Message Types  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  85
+     3.11. Delete Payload  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  88
+     3.12. Vendor ID Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  90
+     3.13. Traffic Selector Payload  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  91
+       3.13.1. Traffic Selector  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  92
+     3.14. Encrypted Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  94
+     3.15. Configuration Payload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  96
+       3.15.1. Configuration Attributes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  97
+       3.15.2. Meaning of INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET/INTERNAL_IP6_SUBNET  . 100
+       3.15.3. Configuration payloads for IPv6 . . . . . . . . . . . 102
+       3.15.4. Address Assignment Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
+     3.16. Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) Payload  . . . . 103
+   4.  Conformance Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
+   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
+     5.1.  Traffic selector authorization  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
+   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
+   7.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
+   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
+     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
+     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
+   Appendix A.  Summary of changes from IKEv1  . . . . . . . . . . . 117
+   Appendix B.  Diffie-Hellman Groups  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
+     B.1.  Group 1 - 768 Bit MODP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
+     B.2.  Group 2 - 1024 Bit MODP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
+   Appendix C.  Exchanges and Payloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 3]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+     C.1.  IKE_SA_INIT Exchange  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
+     C.2.  IKE_AUTH Exchange without EAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
+     C.3.  IKE_AUTH Exchange with EAP  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
+     C.4.  CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange for Creating or Rekeying
+           Child SAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
+     C.5.  CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange for Rekeying the IKE SA  . . . . 122
+     C.6.  INFORMATIONAL Exchange  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
+   Appendix D.  Changes Between Internet Draft Versions  . . . . . . 122
+     D.1.  Changes from IKEv2 to draft -00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
+     D.2.  Changes from draft -00 to draft -01 . . . . . . . . . . . 123
+     D.3.  Changes from draft -00 to draft -01 . . . . . . . . . . . 125
+     D.4.  Changes from draft -01 to draft -02 . . . . . . . . . . . 126
+     D.5.  Changes from draft -02 to draft -03 . . . . . . . . . . . 127
+     D.6.  Changes from draft -03 to
+           draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-00  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
+     D.7.  Changes from draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-00 to
+           draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-01  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
+   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
+   Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements  . . . . . . . . . 134
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 4]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+1.  Introduction
+
+   {{ An introduction to the differences between RFC 4306 [IKEV2] and
+   this document is given at the end of Section 1.  It is put there
+   (instead of here) to preserve the section numbering of RFC 4306. }}
+
+   IP Security (IPsec) provides confidentiality, data integrity, access
+   control, and data source authentication to IP datagrams.  These
+   services are provided by maintaining shared state between the source
+   and the sink of an IP datagram.  This state defines, among other
+   things, the specific services provided to the datagram, which
+   cryptographic algorithms will be used to provide the services, and
+   the keys used as input to the cryptographic algorithms.
+
+   Establishing this shared state in a manual fashion does not scale
+   well.  Therefore, a protocol to establish this state dynamically is
+   needed.  This memo describes such a protocol -- the Internet Key
+   Exchange (IKE).  Version 1 of IKE was defined in RFCs 2407 [DOI],
+   2408 [ISAKMP], and 2409 [IKEV1].  IKEv2 replaced all of those RFCs.
+   IKEv2 was defined in [IKEV2] (RFC 4306) and was clarified in [Clarif]
+   (RFC 4718).  This document replaces and updates RFC 4306 and RFC
+   4718.
+
+   IKE performs mutual authentication between two parties and
+   establishes an IKE security association (SA) that includes shared
+   secret information that can be used to efficiently establish SAs for
+   Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) [ESP] or Authentication Header
+   (AH) [AH] and a set of cryptographic algorithms to be used by the SAs
+   to protect the traffic that they carry.  In this document, the term
+   "suite" or "cryptographic suite" refers to a complete set of
+   algorithms used to protect an SA.  An initiator proposes one or more
+   suites by listing supported algorithms that can be combined into
+   suites in a mix-and-match fashion.  IKE can also negotiate use of IP
+   Compression (IPComp) [IP-COMP] in connection with an ESP or AH SA.
+   The SAs for ESP or AH that get set up through that IKE SA we call
+   "Child SAs".
+
+   All IKE communications consist of pairs of messages: a request and a
+   response.  The pair is called an "exchange".  We call the first
+   messages establishing an IKE SA IKE_SA_INIT and IKE_AUTH exchanges
+   and subsequent IKE exchanges CREATE_CHILD_SA or INFORMATIONAL
+   exchanges.  In the common case, there is a single IKE_SA_INIT
+   exchange and a single IKE_AUTH exchange (a total of four messages) to
+   establish the IKE SA and the first Child SA.  In exceptional cases,
+   there may be more than one of each of these exchanges.  In all cases,
+   all IKE_SA_INIT exchanges MUST complete before any other exchange
+   type, then all IKE_AUTH exchanges MUST complete, and following that
+   any number of CREATE_CHILD_SA and INFORMATIONAL exchanges may occur
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 5]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   in any order.  In some scenarios, only a single Child SA is needed
+   between the IPsec endpoints, and therefore there would be no
+   additional exchanges.  Subsequent exchanges MAY be used to establish
+   additional Child SAs between the same authenticated pair of endpoints
+   and to perform housekeeping functions.
+
+   IKE message flow always consists of a request followed by a response.
+   It is the responsibility of the requester to ensure reliability.  If
+   the response is not received within a timeout interval, the requester
+   needs to retransmit the request (or abandon the connection).
+
+   The first request/response of an IKE session (IKE_SA_INIT) negotiates
+   security parameters for the IKE SA, sends nonces, and sends Diffie-
+   Hellman values.
+
+   The second request/response (IKE_AUTH) transmits identities, proves
+   knowledge of the secrets corresponding to the two identities, and
+   sets up an SA for the first (and often only) AH or ESP Child SA
+   (unless there is failure setting up the AH or ESP Child SA, in which
+   case the IKE SA is still established without IPsec SA).
+
+   The types of subsequent exchanges are CREATE_CHILD_SA (which creates
+   a Child SA) and INFORMATIONAL (which deletes an SA, reports error
+   conditions, or does other housekeeping).  Every request requires a
+   response.  An INFORMATIONAL request with no payloads (other than the
+   empty Encrypted payload required by the syntax) is commonly used as a
+   check for liveness.  These subsequent exchanges cannot be used until
+   the initial exchanges have completed.
+
+   In the description that follows, we assume that no errors occur.
+   Modifications to the flow should errors occur are described in
+   Section 2.21.
+
+1.1.  Usage Scenarios
+
+   IKE is expected to be used to negotiate ESP or AH SAs in a number of
+   different scenarios, each with its own special requirements.
+
+1.1.1.  Security Gateway to Security Gateway Tunnel Mode
+
+                +-+-+-+-+-+            +-+-+-+-+-+
+                |         | IPsec      |         |
+   Protected    |Tunnel   | tunnel     |Tunnel   |     Protected
+   Subnet   <-->|Endpoint |<---------->|Endpoint |<--> Subnet
+                |         |            |         |
+                +-+-+-+-+-+            +-+-+-+-+-+
+
+          Figure 1:  Security Gateway to Security Gateway Tunnel
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 6]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   In this scenario, neither endpoint of the IP connection implements
+   IPsec, but network nodes between them protect traffic for part of the
+   way.  Protection is transparent to the endpoints, and depends on
+   ordinary routing to send packets through the tunnel endpoints for
+   processing.  Each endpoint would announce the set of addresses
+   "behind" it, and packets would be sent in tunnel mode where the inner
+   IP header would contain the IP addresses of the actual endpoints.
+
+1.1.2.  Endpoint-to-Endpoint Transport Mode
+
+   +-+-+-+-+-+                                          +-+-+-+-+-+
+   |         |                 IPsec transport          |         |
+   |Protected|                or tunnel mode SA         |Protected|
+   |Endpoint |<---------------------------------------->|Endpoint |
+   |         |                                          |         |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+                                          +-+-+-+-+-+
+
+                    Figure 2:  Endpoint to Endpoint
+
+   In this scenario, both endpoints of the IP connection implement
+   IPsec, as required of hosts in [IPSECARCH].  Transport mode will
+   commonly be used with no inner IP header.  A single pair of addresses
+   will be negotiated for packets to be protected by this SA.  These
+   endpoints MAY implement application layer access controls based on
+   the IPsec authenticated identities of the participants.  This
+   scenario enables the end-to-end security that has been a guiding
+   principle for the Internet since [ARCHPRINC], [TRANSPARENCY], and a
+   method of limiting the inherent problems with complexity in networks
+   noted by [ARCHGUIDEPHIL].  Although this scenario may not be fully
+   applicable to the IPv4 Internet, it has been deployed successfully in
+   specific scenarios within intranets using IKEv1.  It should be more
+   broadly enabled during the transition to IPv6 and with the adoption
+   of IKEv2.
+
+   It is possible in this scenario that one or both of the protected
+   endpoints will be behind a network address translation (NAT) node, in
+   which case the tunneled packets will have to be UDP encapsulated so
+   that port numbers in the UDP headers can be used to identify
+   individual endpoints "behind" the NAT (see Section 2.23).
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 7]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+1.1.3.  Endpoint to Security Gateway Tunnel Mode
+
+   +-+-+-+-+-+                          +-+-+-+-+-+
+   |         |         IPsec            |         |     Protected
+   |Protected|         tunnel           |Tunnel   |     Subnet
+   |Endpoint |<------------------------>|Endpoint |<--- and/or
+   |         |                          |         |     Internet
+   +-+-+-+-+-+                          +-+-+-+-+-+
+
+              Figure 3:  Endpoint to Security Gateway Tunnel
+
+   In this scenario, a protected endpoint (typically a portable roaming
+   computer) connects back to its corporate network through an IPsec-
+   protected tunnel.  It might use this tunnel only to access
+   information on the corporate network, or it might tunnel all of its
+   traffic back through the corporate network in order to take advantage
+   of protection provided by a corporate firewall against Internet-based
+   attacks.  In either case, the protected endpoint will want an IP
+   address associated with the security gateway so that packets returned
+   to it will go to the security gateway and be tunneled back.  This IP
+   address may be static or may be dynamically allocated by the security
+   gateway. {{ Clarif-6.1 }} In support of the latter case, IKEv2
+   includes a mechanism (namely, configuration payloads) for the
+   initiator to request an IP address owned by the security gateway for
+   use for the duration of its SA.
+
+   In this scenario, packets will use tunnel mode.  On each packet from
+   the protected endpoint, the outer IP header will contain the source
+   IP address associated with its current location (i.e., the address
+   that will get traffic routed to the endpoint directly), while the
+   inner IP header will contain the source IP address assigned by the
+   security gateway (i.e., the address that will get traffic routed to
+   the security gateway for forwarding to the endpoint).  The outer
+   destination address will always be that of the security gateway,
+   while the inner destination address will be the ultimate destination
+   for the packet.
+
+   In this scenario, it is possible that the protected endpoint will be
+   behind a NAT.  In that case, the IP address as seen by the security
+   gateway will not be the same as the IP address sent by the protected
+   endpoint, and packets will have to be UDP encapsulated in order to be
+   routed properly.
+
+1.1.4.  Other Scenarios
+
+   Other scenarios are possible, as are nested combinations of the
+   above.  One notable example combines aspects of 1.1.1 and 1.1.3.  A
+   subnet may make all external accesses through a remote security
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 8]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   gateway using an IPsec tunnel, where the addresses on the subnet are
+   routed to the security gateway by the rest of the Internet.  An
+   example would be someone's home network being virtually on the
+   Internet with static IP addresses even though connectivity is
+   provided by an ISP that assigns a single dynamically assigned IP
+   address to the user's security gateway (where the static IP addresses
+   and an IPsec relay are provided by a third party located elsewhere).
+
+1.2.  The Initial Exchanges
+
+   Communication using IKE always begins with IKE_SA_INIT and IKE_AUTH
+   exchanges (known in IKEv1 as Phase 1).  These initial exchanges
+   normally consist of four messages, though in some scenarios that
+   number can grow.  All communications using IKE consist of request/
+   response pairs.  We'll describe the base exchange first, followed by
+   variations.  The first pair of messages (IKE_SA_INIT) negotiate
+   cryptographic algorithms, exchange nonces, and do a Diffie-Hellman
+   exchange [DH].
+
+   The second pair of messages (IKE_AUTH) authenticate the previous
+   messages, exchange identities and certificates, and establish the
+   first Child SA.  Parts of these messages are encrypted and integrity
+   protected with keys established through the IKE_SA_INIT exchange, so
+   the identities are hidden from eavesdroppers and all fields in all
+   the messages are authenticated.  (See Section 2.14 for information on
+   how the encyrption keys are generated.)
+
+   All messages following the initial exchange are cryptographically
+   protected using the cryptographic algorithms and keys negotiated in
+   the the IKE_SA_INIT exchange.  These subsequent messages use the
+   syntax of the Encrypted Payload described in Section 3.14, encrypted
+   with keys that are derived as described in Section 2.14.  All
+   subsequent messages include an Encrypted Payload, even if they are
+   referred to in the text as "empty".  For the CREATE_CHILD_SA,
+   IKE_AUTH, or IKE_INFORMATIONAL exchanges, the message following the
+   header is encrypted and the message including the header is integrity
+   protected using the cryptographic algorithms negotiated for the IKE
+   SA.
+
+   In the following descriptions, the payloads contained in the message
+   are indicated by names as listed below.
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                  [Page 9]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Notation    Payload
+   -----------------------------------------
+   AUTH        Authentication
+   CERT        Certificate
+   CERTREQ     Certificate Request
+   CP          Configuration
+   D           Delete
+   E           Encrypted
+   EAP         Extensible Authentication
+   HDR         IKE Header
+   IDi         Identification - Initiator
+   IDr         Identification - Responder
+   KE          Key Exchange
+   Ni, Nr      Nonce
+   N           Notify
+   SA          Security Association
+   TSi         Traffic Selector - Initiator
+   TSr         Traffic Selector - Responder
+   V           Vendor ID
+
+   The details of the contents of each payload are described in section
+   3.  Payloads that may optionally appear will be shown in brackets,
+   such as [CERTREQ], indicate that optionally a certificate request
+   payload can be included.
+
+   The initial exchanges are as follows:
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR, SAi1, KEi, Ni  -->
+
+   HDR contains the Security Parameter Indexes (SPIs), version numbers,
+   and flags of various sorts.  The SAi1 payload states the
+   cryptographic algorithms the initiator supports for the IKE SA.  The
+   KE payload sends the initiator's Diffie-Hellman value.  Ni is the
+   initiator's nonce.
+
+                                <--  HDR, SAr1, KEr, Nr, [CERTREQ]
+
+   The responder chooses a cryptographic suite from the initiator's
+   offered choices and expresses that choice in the SAr1 payload,
+   completes the Diffie-Hellman exchange with the KEr payload, and sends
+   its nonce in the Nr payload.
+
+   At this point in the negotiation, each party can generate SKEYSEED,
+   from which all keys are derived for that IKE SA.  The messages that
+   follow are encrypted and integrity protected in their entirety, with
+   the exception of the message headers.  The keys used for the
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 10]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   encryption and integrity protection are derived from SKEYSEED and are
+   known as SK_e (encryption) and SK_a (authentication, a.k.a. integrity
+   protection).  A separate SK_e and SK_a is computed for each
+   direction.  In addition to the keys SK_e and SK_a derived from the DH
+   value for protection of the IKE SA, another quantity SK_d is derived
+   and used for derivation of further keying material for Child SAs.
+   The notation SK { ... } indicates that these payloads are encrypted
+   and integrity protected using that direction's SK_e and SK_a.
+
+   HDR, SK {IDi, [CERT,] [CERTREQ,]
+       [IDr,] AUTH, SAi2,
+       TSi, TSr}  -->
+
+   The initiator asserts its identity with the IDi payload, proves
+   knowledge of the secret corresponding to IDi and integrity protects
+   the contents of the first message using the AUTH payload (see
+   Section 2.15).  It might also send its certificate(s) in CERT
+   payload(s) and a list of its trust anchors in CERTREQ payload(s).  If
+   any CERT payloads are included, the first certificate provided MUST
+   contain the public key used to verify the AUTH field.
+
+   The optional payload IDr enables the initiator to specify which of
+   the responder's identities it wants to talk to.  This is useful when
+   the machine on which the responder is running is hosting multiple
+   identities at the same IP address.  If the IDr proposed by the
+   initiator is not acceptable to the responder, the responder might use
+   some other IDr to finish the exchange.  If the initiator then does
+   not accept that fact that responder used different IDr than the one
+   that was requested, the initiator can close the SA after noticing the
+   fact.
+
+   The initiator begins negotiation of a Child SA using the SAi2
+   payload.  The final fields (starting with SAi2) are described in the
+   description of the CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange.
+
+                                <--  HDR, SK {IDr, [CERT,] AUTH,
+                                         SAr2, TSi, TSr}
+
+   The responder asserts its identity with the IDr payload, optionally
+   sends one or more certificates (again with the certificate containing
+   the public key used to verify AUTH listed first), authenticates its
+   identity and protects the integrity of the second message with the
+   AUTH payload, and completes negotiation of a Child SA with the
+   additional fields described below in the CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange.
+
+   The recipients of messages 3 and 4 MUST verify that all signatures
+   and MACs are computed correctly and that the names in the ID payloads
+   correspond to the keys used to generate the AUTH payload.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 11]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   {{ Clarif-4.2}} If creating the Child SA during the IKE_AUTH exchange
+   fails for some reason, the IKE SA is still created as usual.  The
+   list of responses in the IKE_AUTH exchange that do not prevent an IKE
+   SA from being set up include at least the following:
+   NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN, TS_UNACCEPTABLE, SINGLE_PAIR_REQUIRED,
+   INTERNAL_ADDRESS_FAILURE, and FAILED_CP_REQUIRED.
+
+   {{ Clarif-4.3 }} Note that IKE_AUTH messages do not contain KEi/KEr
+   or Ni/Nr payloads.  Thus, the SA payloads in the IKE_AUTH exchange
+   cannot contain Transform Type 4 (Diffie-Hellman Group) with any value
+   other than NONE.  Implementations SHOULD omit the whole transform
+   substructure instead of sending value NONE.
+
+1.3.  The CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange
+
+   {{ This is a heavy rewrite of most of this section.  The major
+   organization changes are described in Clarif-4.1 and Clarif-5.1. }}
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange is used to create new Child SAs and to
+   rekey both IKE SAs and Child SAs.  This exchange consists of a single
+   request/response pair, and some of its function was referred to as a
+   phase 2 exchange in IKEv1.  It MAY be initiated by either end of the
+   IKE SA after the initial exchanges are completed.
+
+   All messages following the initial exchange are cryptographically
+   protected using the cryptographic algorithms and keys negotiated in
+   the first two messages of the IKE exchange.  These subsequent
+   messages use the syntax of the Encrypted Payload described in
+   Section 3.14, encrypted with keys that are derived as described in
+   Section 2.14.  All subsequent messages include an Encrypted Payload,
+   even if they are referred to in the text as "empty".  For both
+   messages in the CREATE_CHILD_SA, the message following the header is
+   encrypted and the message including the header is integrity protected
+   using the cryptographic algorithms negotiated for the IKE SA.
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA is also used for rekeying IKE SAs and Child SAs.
+   An SA is rekeyed by creating a new SA and then deleting the old one.
+   This section describes the first part of rekeying, the creation of
+   new SAs; Section 2.8 covers the mechanics of rekeying, including
+   moving traffic from old to new SAs and the deletion of the old SAs.
+   The two sections must be read together to understand the entire
+   process of rekeying.
+
+   Either endpoint may initiate a CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange, so in this
+   section the term initiator refers to the endpoint initiating this
+   exchange.  An implementation MAY refuse all CREATE_CHILD_SA requests
+   within an IKE SA.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 12]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA request MAY optionally contain a KE payload for
+   an additional Diffie-Hellman exchange to enable stronger guarantees
+   of forward secrecy for the Child SA.  The keying material for the
+   Child SA is a function of SK_d established during the establishment
+   of the IKE SA, the nonces exchanged during the CREATE_CHILD_SA
+   exchange, and the Diffie-Hellman value (if KE payloads are included
+   in the CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange).
+
+   If a CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange includes a KEi payload, at least one of
+   the SA offers MUST include the Diffie-Hellman group of the KEi.  The
+   Diffie-Hellman group of the KEi MUST be an element of the group the
+   initiator expects the responder to accept (additional Diffie-Hellman
+   groups can be proposed).  If the responder selects a proposal using a
+   different Diffie-Hellman group (other than NONE), the responder MUST
+   reject the request and indicate its preferred Diffie-Hellman group in
+   the INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD Notification payload. {{ 3.10.1-17 }} There
+   are two octets of data associated with this notification: the
+   accepted D-H Group number in big endian order.  In the case of such a
+   rejection, the CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange fails, and the initiator will
+   probably retry the exchange with a Diffie-Hellman proposal and KEi in
+   the group that the responder gave in the INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-35 }} The responder sends a NO_ADDITIONAL_SAS notification
+   to indicate that a CREATE_CHILD_SA request is unacceptable because
+   the responder is unwilling to accept any more Child SAs on this IKE
+   SA.  Some minimal implementations may only accept a single Child SA
+   setup in the context of an initial IKE exchange and reject any
+   subsequent attempts to add more.
+
+1.3.1.  Creating New Child SAs with the CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange
+
+   A Child SA may be created by sending a CREATE_CHILD_SA request.  The
+   CREATE_CHILD_SA request for creating a new Child SA is:
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR, SK {SA, Ni, [KEi],
+              TSi, TSr}  -->
+
+   The initiator sends SA offer(s) in the SA payload, a nonce in the Ni
+   payload, optionally a Diffie-Hellman value in the KEi payload, and
+   the proposed traffic selectors for the proposed Child SA in the TSi
+   and TSr payloads.
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA response for creating a new Child SA is:
+
+                                <--  HDR, SK {SA, Nr, [KEr],
+                                         TSi, TSr}
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 13]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   The responder replies (using the same Message ID to respond) with the
+   accepted offer in an SA payload, and a Diffie-Hellman value in the
+   KEr payload if KEi was included in the request and the selected
+   cryptographic suite includes that group.
+
+   The traffic selectors for traffic to be sent on that SA are specified
+   in the TS payloads in the response, which may be a subset of what the
+   initiator of the Child SA proposed.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16391 }} The USE_TRANSPORT_MODE notification MAY be
+   included in a request message that also includes an SA payload
+   requesting a Child SA.  It requests that the Child SA use transport
+   mode rather than tunnel mode for the SA created.  If the request is
+   accepted, the response MUST also include a notification of type
+   USE_TRANSPORT_MODE.  If the responder declines the request, the Child
+   SA will be established in tunnel mode.  If this is unacceptable to
+   the initiator, the initiator MUST delete the SA.  Note: Except when
+   using this option to negotiate transport mode, all Child SAs will use
+   tunnel mode.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16394 }} The ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED notification
+   asserts that the sending endpoint will NOT accept packets that
+   contain Traffic Flow Confidentiality (TFC) padding over the Child SA
+   being negotiated. {{ Clarif-4.5 }} If neither endpoint accepts TFC
+   padding, this notification is included in both the request and the
+   response.  If this notification is included in only one of the
+   messages, TFC padding can still be sent in the other direction.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16395 }} The NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO notification is used
+   for fragmentation control.  See [IPSECARCH] for a fuller explanation.
+   {{ Clarif-4.6 }} Both parties need to agree to sending non-first
+   fragments before either party does so.  It is enabled only if
+   NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO notification is included in both the request
+   proposing an SA and the response accepting it.  If the responder does
+   not want to send or receive non-first fragments, it only omits
+   NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO notification from its response, but does not
+   reject the whole Child SA creation.
+
+1.3.2.  Rekeying IKE SAs with the CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA request for rekeying an IKE SA is:
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR, SK {SA, Ni, [KEi]} -->
+
+   The initiator sends SA offer(s) in the SA payload, a nonce in the Ni
+   payload, and a Diffie-Hellman value in the KEi payload.  The KEi
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 14]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   payload SHOULD be included.  New initiator and responder SPIs are
+   supplied in the SPI fields of the SA payload.
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA response for rekeying an IKE SA is:
+
+                                <--  HDR, SK {SA, Nr,[KEr]}
+
+   The responder replies (using the same Message ID to respond) with the
+   accepted offer in an SA payload, and a Diffie-Hellman value in the
+   KEr payload if the selected cryptographic suite includes that group.
+
+   The new IKE SA has its message counters set to 0, regardless of what
+   they were in the earlier IKE SA.  The window size starts at 1 for any
+   new IKE SA.
+
+1.3.3.  Rekeying Child SAs with the CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA request for rekeying a Child SA is:
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR, SK {N, SA, Ni, [KEi],
+       TSi, TSr}   -->
+
+   The initiator sends SA offer(s) in the SA payload, a nonce in the Ni
+   payload, optionally a Diffie-Hellman value in the KEi payload, and
+   the proposed traffic selectors for the proposed Child SA in the TSi
+   and TSr payloads.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16393 }} The REKEY_SA notification MUST be included in a
+   CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange if the purpose of the exchange is to replace
+   an existing ESP or AH SA. {{ Clarif-5.4 }} The SA being rekeyed is
+   identified by the SPI field in the Notify payload; this is the SPI
+   the exchange initiator would expect in inbound ESP or AH packets.
+   There is no data associated with this Notify type.  The Protocol ID
+   field of the REKEY_SA notification is set to match the protocol of
+   the SA we are rekeying, for example, 3 for ESP and 2 for AH.
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA response for rekeying a Child SA is:
+
+                                <--  HDR, SK {SA, Nr, [KEr],
+                                         TSi, TSr}
+
+   The responder replies (using the same Message ID to respond) with the
+   accepted offer in an SA payload, and a Diffie-Hellman value in the
+   KEr payload if KEi was included in the request and the selected
+   cryptographic suite includes that group.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 15]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   The traffic selectors for traffic to be sent on that SA are specified
+   in the TS payloads in the response, which may be a subset of what the
+   initiator of the Child SA proposed.
+
+1.4.  The INFORMATIONAL Exchange
+
+   At various points during the operation of an IKE SA, peers may desire
+   to convey control messages to each other regarding errors or
+   notifications of certain events.  To accomplish this, IKE defines an
+   INFORMATIONAL exchange.  INFORMATIONAL exchanges MUST ONLY occur
+   after the initial exchanges and are cryptographically protected with
+   the negotiated keys.
+
+   Control messages that pertain to an IKE SA MUST be sent under that
+   IKE SA.  Control messages that pertain to Child SAs MUST be sent
+   under the protection of the IKE SA which generated them (or its
+   successor if the IKE SA was rekeyed).
+
+   Messages in an INFORMATIONAL exchange contain zero or more
+   Notification, Delete, and Configuration payloads.  The Recipient of
+   an INFORMATIONAL exchange request MUST send some response (else the
+   Sender will assume the message was lost in the network and will
+   retransmit it).  That response MAY be a message with no payloads.
+   The request message in an INFORMATIONAL exchange MAY also contain no
+   payloads.  This is the expected way an endpoint can ask the other
+   endpoint to verify that it is alive.
+
+   The INFORMATIONAL exchange is defined as:
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR, SK {[N,] [D,]
+       [CP,] ...}  -->
+                                <--  HDR, SK {[N,] [D,]
+                                         [CP], ...}
+
+   The processing of an INFORMATIONAL exchange is determined by its
+   component payloads.
+
+1.4.1.  Deleting an SA with INFORMATIONAL Exchanges
+
+   {{ Clarif-5.6 }} ESP and AH SAs always exist in pairs, with one SA in
+   each direction.  When an SA is closed, both members of the pair MUST
+   be closed (that is, deleted).  Each endpoint MUST close its incoming
+   SAs and allow the other endpoint to close the other SA in each pair.
+   To delete an SA, an INFORMATIONAL exchange with one or more delete
+   payloads is sent listing the SPIs (as they would be expected in the
+   headers of inbound packets) of the SAs to be deleted.  The recipient
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 16]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   MUST close the designated SAs. {{ Clarif-5.7 }} Note that one never
+   sends delete payloads for the two sides of an SA in a single message.
+   If there are many SAs to delete at the same time, one includes delete
+   payloads for the inbound half of each SA pair in your Informational
+   exchange.
+
+   Normally, the reply in the INFORMATIONAL exchange will contain delete
+   payloads for the paired SAs going in the other direction.  There is
+   one exception.  If by chance both ends of a set of SAs independently
+   decide to close them, each may send a delete payload and the two
+   requests may cross in the network.  If a node receives a delete
+   request for SAs for which it has already issued a delete request, it
+   MUST delete the outgoing SAs while processing the request and the
+   incoming SAs while processing the response.  In that case, the
+   responses MUST NOT include delete payloads for the deleted SAs, since
+   that would result in duplicate deletion and could in theory delete
+   the wrong SA.
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} Half-closed ESP or AH connections are
+   anomalous, and a node with auditing capability should probably audit
+   their existence if they persist.  Note that this specification
+   nowhere specifies time periods, so it is up to individual endpoints
+   to decide how long to wait.  A node MAY refuse to accept incoming
+   data on half-closed connections but MUST NOT unilaterally close them
+   and reuse the SPIs.  If connection state becomes sufficiently messed
+   up, a node MAY close the IKE SA; doing so will implicitly close all
+   SAs negotiated under it.  It can then rebuild the SAs it needs on a
+   clean base under a new IKE SA. {{ Clarif-5.8 }} The response to a
+   request that deletes the IKE SA is an empty Informational response.
+
+1.5.  Informational Messages outside of an IKE SA
+
+   If an encrypted IKE request packet arrives on port 500 or 4500 with
+   an unrecognized SPI, it could be because the receiving node has
+   recently crashed and lost state or because of some other system
+   malfunction or attack.  If the receiving node has an active IKE SA to
+   the IP address from whence the packet came, it MAY send a
+   notification of the wayward packet over that IKE SA in an
+   INFORMATIONAL exchange.  If it does not have such an IKE SA, it MAY
+   send an Informational message without cryptographic protection to the
+   source IP address.  Such a message is not part of an informational
+   exchange, and the receiving node MUST NOT respond to it.  Doing so
+   could cause a message loop.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-11 }} The INVALID_SPI notification MAY be sent in an IKE
+   INFORMATIONAL exchange when a node receives an ESP or AH packet with
+   an invalid SPI.  The Notification Data contains the SPI of the
+   invalid packet.  This usually indicates a node has rebooted and
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 17]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   forgotten an SA.  If this Informational Message is sent outside the
+   context of an IKE SA, it should only be used by the recipient as a
+   "hint" that something might be wrong (because it could easily be
+   forged).
+
+   {{ Clarif-7.7 }} There are two cases when such a one-way notification
+   is sent: INVALID_IKE_SPI and INVALID_SPI.  These notifications are
+   sent outside of an IKE SA.  Note that such notifications are
+   explicitly not Informational exchanges; these are one-way messages
+   that must not be responded to.
+
+   In case of INVALID_IKE_SPI, the message sent is a response message,
+   and thus it is sent to the IP address and port from whence it came
+   with the same IKE SPIs and the Message ID is copied.  The Response
+   bit is set to 1, and the version flags are set in the normal fashion.
+
+   In case of INVALID_SPI, however, there are no IKE SPI values that
+   would be meaningful to the recipient of such a notification.  Using
+   zero values or random values are both acceptable.  The Initiator flag
+   is set, the Response bit is set to 0, and the version flags are set
+   in the normal fashion.
+
+1.6.  Requirements Terminology
+
+   Definitions of the primitive terms in this document (such as Security
+   Association or SA) can be found in [IPSECARCH]. {{ Clarif-7.2 }} It
+   should be noted that parts of IKEv2 rely on some of the processing
+   rules in [IPSECARCH], as described in various sections of this
+   document.
+
+   Keywords "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT" and
+   "MAY" that appear in this document are to be interpreted as described
+   in [MUSTSHOULD].
+
+1.7.  Differences Between RFC 4306 and This Document
+
+   {{ Added this entire section, including this recursive remark. }}
+
+   This document contains clarifications and amplifications to IKEv2
+   [IKEV2].  The clarifications are mostly based on [Clarif].  The
+   changes listed in that document were discussed in the IPsec Working
+   Group and, after the Working Group was disbanded, on the IPsec
+   mailing list.  That document contains detailed explanations of areas
+   that were unclear in IKEv2, and is thus useful to implementers of
+   IKEv2.
+
+   The protocol described in this document retains the same major
+   version number (2) and minor version number (0) as was used in RFC
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 18]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   4306.  That is, the version number is *not* changed from RFC 4306.
+
+   This document makes the figures and references a bit more regular
+   than in [IKEV2].
+
+   IKEv2 developers have noted that the SHOULD-level requirements are
+   often unclear in that they don't say when it is OK to not obey the
+   requirements.  They also have noted that there are MUST-level
+   requirements that are not related to interoperability.  This document
+   has more explanation of some of these requirements.  All non-
+   capitalized uses of the words SHOULD and MUST now mean their normal
+   English sense, not the interoperability sense of [MUSTSHOULD].
+
+   IKEv2 (and IKEv1) developers have noted that there is a great deal of
+   material in the tables of codes in Section 3.10.1.  This leads to
+   implementers not having all the needed information in the main body
+   of the document.  Much of the material from those tables has been
+   moved into the associated parts of the main body of the document.
+
+   In the body of this document, notes that are enclosed in double curly
+   braces {{ such as this }} point out changes from IKEv2.  Changes that
+   come from [Clarif] are marked with the section from that document,
+   such as "{{ Clarif-2.10 }}".  Changes that come from moving
+   descriptive text out of the tables in Section 3.10.1 are marked with
+   that number and the message type that contained the text, such as "{{
+   3.10.1-16384 }}".
+
+   This document removes discussion of nesting AH and ESP.  This was a
+   mistake in RFC 4306 caused by the lag between finishing RFC 4306 and
+   RFC 4301.  Basically, IKEv2 is based on RFC 4301, which does not
+   include "SA bundles" that were part of RFC 2401.  While a single
+   packet can go through IPsec processing multiple times, each of these
+   passes uses a separate SA, and the passes are coordinated by the
+   forwarding tables.  In IKEv2, each of these SAs has to be created
+   using a separate CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange.
+
+   This document removes discussion of the INTERNAL_ADDRESS_EXPIRY
+   configuration attribute because its implementation was very
+   problematic.  Implementations that conform to this document MUST
+   ignore proposals that have configuration attribute type 5, the old
+   value for INTERNAL_ADDRESS_EXPIRY.
+
+   This document adds the restriction in Section 2.13 that all PRFs used
+   with IKEv2 MUST take variable-sized keys.  This should not affect any
+   implementations because there were no standardized PRFs that have
+   fixed-size keys.
+
+   A later version of this document may have all the {{ }} comments
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 19]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   removed from the body of the document and instead appear in an
+   appendix.
+
+
+2.  IKE Protocol Details and Variations
+
+   IKE normally listens and sends on UDP port 500, though IKE messages
+   may also be received on UDP port 4500 with a slightly different
+   format (see Section 2.23).  Since UDP is a datagram (unreliable)
+   protocol, IKE includes in its definition recovery from transmission
+   errors, including packet loss, packet replay, and packet forgery.
+   IKE is designed to function so long as (1) at least one of a series
+   of retransmitted packets reaches its destination before timing out;
+   and (2) the channel is not so full of forged and replayed packets so
+   as to exhaust the network or CPU capacities of either endpoint.  Even
+   in the absence of those minimum performance requirements, IKE is
+   designed to fail cleanly (as though the network were broken).
+
+   Although IKEv2 messages are intended to be short, they contain
+   structures with no hard upper bound on size (in particular, X.509
+   certificates), and IKEv2 itself does not have a mechanism for
+   fragmenting large messages.  IP defines a mechanism for fragmentation
+   of oversize UDP messages, but implementations vary in the maximum
+   message size supported.  Furthermore, use of IP fragmentation opens
+   an implementation to denial of service attacks [DOSUDPPROT].
+   Finally, some NAT and/or firewall implementations may block IP
+   fragments.
+
+   All IKEv2 implementations MUST be able to send, receive, and process
+   IKE messages that are up to 1280 octets long, and they SHOULD be able
+   to send, receive, and process messages that are up to 3000 octets
+   long. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} IKEv2 implementations need to be aware
+   of the maximum UDP message size supported and MAY shorten messages by
+   leaving out some certificates or cryptographic suite proposals if
+   that will keep messages below the maximum.  Use of the "Hash and URL"
+   formats rather than including certificates in exchanges where
+   possible can avoid most problems. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }}
+   Implementations and configuration need to keep in mind, however, that
+   if the URL lookups are possible only after the IPsec SA is
+   established, recursion issues could prevent this technique from
+   working.
+
+   {{ Clarif-7.5 }} The UDP payload of all packets containing IKE
+   messages sent on port 4500 MUST begin with the prefix of four zeros;
+   otherwise, the receiver won't know how to handle them.
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 20]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+2.1.  Use of Retransmission Timers
+
+   All messages in IKE exist in pairs: a request and a response.  The
+   setup of an IKE SA normally consists of two request/response pairs.
+   Once the IKE SA is set up, either end of the security association may
+   initiate requests at any time, and there can be many requests and
+   responses "in flight" at any given moment.  But each message is
+   labeled as either a request or a response, and for each request/
+   response pair one end of the security association is the initiator
+   and the other is the responder.
+
+   For every pair of IKE messages, the initiator is responsible for
+   retransmission in the event of a timeout.  The responder MUST never
+   retransmit a response unless it receives a retransmission of the
+   request.  In that event, the responder MUST ignore the retransmitted
+   request except insofar as it triggers a retransmission of the
+   response.  The initiator MUST remember each request until it receives
+   the corresponding response.  The responder MUST remember each
+   response until it receives a request whose sequence number is larger
+   than or equal to the sequence number in the response plus its window
+   size (see Section 2.3).
+
+   IKE is a reliable protocol, in the sense that the initiator MUST
+   retransmit a request until either it receives a corresponding reply
+   OR it deems the IKE security association to have failed and it
+   discards all state associated with the IKE SA and any Child SAs
+   negotiated using that IKE SA.  A retransmission from the initiator
+   MUST be bitwise identical to the original request.  That is,
+   everything starting from the IKE Header (the IKE SA Initiator's SPI
+   onwards) must be bitwise identical; items before it (such as the IP
+   and UDP headers, and the zero non-ESP marker) do not have to be
+   identical.
+
+   {{ Clarif-2.3 }} Retransmissions of the IKE_SA_INIT request require
+   some special handling.  When a responder receives an IKE_SA_INIT
+   request, it has to determine whether the packet is retransmission
+   belonging to an existing "half-open" IKE SA (in which case the
+   responder retransmits the same response), or a new request (in which
+   case the responder creates a new IKE SA and sends a fresh response),
+   or it belongs to an existing IKE SA where the IKE_AUTH request has
+   been already received (in which case the responder ignores it).
+
+   It is not sufficient to use the initiator's SPI and/or IP address to
+   differentiate between these three cases because two different peers
+   behind a single NAT could choose the same initiator SPI.  Instead, a
+   robust responder will do the IKE SA lookup using the whole packet,
+   its hash, or the Ni payload.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 21]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+2.2.  Use of Sequence Numbers for Message ID
+
+   Every IKE message contains a Message ID as part of its fixed header.
+   This Message ID is used to match up requests and responses, and to
+   identify retransmissions of messages.
+
+   The Message ID is a 32-bit quantity, which is zero for the
+   IKE_SA_INIT messages (including retries of the message due to
+   responses such as COOKIE and INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD {{ Clarif-2.2 }}),
+   and incremented for each subsequent exchange.  Rekeying an IKE SA
+   resets the sequence numbers.  Thus, the first pair of IKE_AUTH
+   messages will have ID of 1, the second (when EAP is used) will be 2,
+   and so on. {{ Clarif-3.10 }}
+
+   Each endpoint in the IKE Security Association maintains two "current"
+   Message IDs: the next one to be used for a request it initiates and
+   the next one it expects to see in a request from the other end.
+   These counters increment as requests are generated and received.
+   Responses always contain the same message ID as the corresponding
+   request.  That means that after the initial exchange, each integer n
+   may appear as the message ID in four distinct messages: the nth
+   request from the original IKE initiator, the corresponding response,
+   the nth request from the original IKE responder, and the
+   corresponding response.  If the two ends make very different numbers
+   of requests, the Message IDs in the two directions can be very
+   different.  There is no ambiguity in the messages, however, because
+   the (I)nitiator and (R)esponse bits in the message header specify
+   which of the four messages a particular one is.
+
+   {{ Clarif-5.9 }} Throughout this document, "initiator" refers to the
+   party who initiated the exchange being described, and "original
+   initiator" refers to the party who initiated the whole IKE SA.  The
+   "original initiator" always refers to the party who initiated the
+   exchange which resulted in the current IKE SA.  In other words, if
+   the "original responder" starts rekeying the IKE SA, that party
+   becomes the "original initiator" of the new IKE SA.
+
+   Note that Message IDs are cryptographically protected and provide
+   protection against message replays.  In the unlikely event that
+   Message IDs grow too large to fit in 32 bits, the IKE SA MUST be
+   closed or rekeyed.
+
+2.3.  Window Size for Overlapping Requests
+
+   In order to maximize IKE throughput, an IKE endpoint MAY issue
+   multiple requests before getting a response to any of them if the
+   other endpoint has indicated its ability to handle such requests.
+   For simplicity, an IKE implementation MAY choose to process requests
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 22]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   strictly in order and/or wait for a response to one request before
+   issuing another.  Certain rules must be followed to ensure
+   interoperability between implementations using different strategies.
+
+   After an IKE SA is set up, either end can initiate one or more
+   requests.  These requests may pass one another over the network.  An
+   IKE endpoint MUST be prepared to accept and process a request while
+   it has a request outstanding in order to avoid a deadlock in this
+   situation. {{ Downgraded the SHOULD }} An IKE endpoint may also
+   accept and process multiple requests while it has a request
+   outstanding.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16385 }} The SET_WINDOW_SIZE notification asserts that the
+   sending endpoint is capable of keeping state for multiple outstanding
+   exchanges, permitting the recipient to send multiple requests before
+   getting a response to the first.  The data associated with a
+   SET_WINDOW_SIZE notification MUST be 4 octets long and contain the
+   big endian representation of the number of messages the sender
+   promises to keep.  The window size is always one until the initial
+   exchanges complete.
+
+   An IKE endpoint MUST wait for a response to each of its messages
+   before sending a subsequent message unless it has received a
+   SET_WINDOW_SIZE Notify message from its peer informing it that the
+   peer is prepared to maintain state for multiple outstanding messages
+   in order to allow greater throughput.
+
+   An IKE endpoint MUST NOT exceed the peer's stated window size for
+   transmitted IKE requests.  In other words, if the responder stated
+   its window size is N, then when the initiator needs to make a request
+   X, it MUST wait until it has received responses to all requests up
+   through request X-N.  An IKE endpoint MUST keep a copy of (or be able
+   to regenerate exactly) each request it has sent until it receives the
+   corresponding response.  An IKE endpoint MUST keep a copy of (or be
+   able to regenerate exactly) the number of previous responses equal to
+   its declared window size in case its response was lost and the
+   initiator requests its retransmission by retransmitting the request.
+
+   An IKE endpoint supporting a window size greater than one ought to be
+   capable of processing incoming requests out of order to maximize
+   performance in the event of network failures or packet reordering.
+
+   {{ Clarif-7.3 }} The window size is normally a (possibly
+   configurable) property of a particular implementation, and is not
+   related to congestion control (unlike the window size in TCP, for
+   example).  In particular, it is not defined what the responder should
+   do when it receives a SET_WINDOW_SIZE notification containing a
+   smaller value than is currently in effect.  Thus, there is currently
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 23]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   no way to reduce the window size of an existing IKE SA; you can only
+   increase it.  When rekeying an IKE SA, the new IKE SA starts with
+   window size 1 until it is explicitly increased by sending a new
+   SET_WINDOW_SIZE notification.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-9 }}The INVALID_MESSAGE_ID notification is sent when an IKE
+   message ID outside the supported window is received.  This Notify
+   MUST NOT be sent in a response; the invalid request MUST NOT be
+   acknowledged.  Instead, inform the other side by initiating an
+   INFORMATIONAL exchange with Notification data containing the four
+   octet invalid message ID.  Sending this notification is optional, and
+   notifications of this type MUST be rate limited.
+
+2.4.  State Synchronization and Connection Timeouts
+
+   An IKE endpoint is allowed to forget all of its state associated with
+   an IKE SA and the collection of corresponding Child SAs at any time.
+   This is the anticipated behavior in the event of an endpoint crash
+   and restart.  It is important when an endpoint either fails or
+   reinitializes its state that the other endpoint detect those
+   conditions and not continue to waste network bandwidth by sending
+   packets over discarded SAs and having them fall into a black hole.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16384 }} The INITIAL_CONTACT notification asserts that this
+   IKE SA is the only IKE SA currently active between the authenticated
+   identities.  It MAY be sent when an IKE SA is established after a
+   crash, and the recipient MAY use this information to delete any other
+   IKE SAs it has to the same authenticated identity without waiting for
+   a timeout.  This notification MUST NOT be sent by an entity that may
+   be replicated (e.g., a roaming user's credentials where the user is
+   allowed to connect to the corporate firewall from two remote systems
+   at the same time). {{ Clarif-7.9 }} The INITIAL_CONTACT notification,
+   if sent, MUST be in the first IKE_AUTH request, not as a separate
+   exchange afterwards; however, receiving parties need to deal with it
+   in other requests.
+
+   Since IKE is designed to operate in spite of Denial of Service (DoS)
+   attacks from the network, an endpoint MUST NOT conclude that the
+   other endpoint has failed based on any routing information (e.g.,
+   ICMP messages) or IKE messages that arrive without cryptographic
+   protection (e.g., Notify messages complaining about unknown SPIs).
+   An endpoint MUST conclude that the other endpoint has failed only
+   when repeated attempts to contact it have gone unanswered for a
+   timeout period or when a cryptographically protected INITIAL_CONTACT
+   notification is received on a different IKE SA to the same
+   authenticated identity. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} An endpoint should
+   suspect that the other endpoint has failed based on routing
+   information and initiate a request to see whether the other endpoint
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 24]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   is alive.  To check whether the other side is alive, IKE specifies an
+   empty INFORMATIONAL message that (like all IKE requests) requires an
+   acknowledgement (note that within the context of an IKE SA, an
+   "empty" message consists of an IKE header followed by an Encrypted
+   payload that contains no payloads).  If a cryptographically protected
+   (fresh, i.e. not retransmitted) message has been received from the
+   other side recently, unprotected notifications MAY be ignored.
+   Implementations MUST limit the rate at which they take actions based
+   on unprotected messages.
+
+   Numbers of retries and lengths of timeouts are not covered in this
+   specification because they do not affect interoperability.  It is
+   suggested that messages be retransmitted at least a dozen times over
+   a period of at least several minutes before giving up on an SA, but
+   different environments may require different rules.  To be a good
+   network citizen, retranmission times MUST increase exponentially to
+   avoid flooding the network and making an existing congestion
+   situation worse.  If there has only been outgoing traffic on all of
+   the SAs associated with an IKE SA, it is essential to confirm
+   liveness of the other endpoint to avoid black holes.  If no
+   cryptographically protected messages have been received on an IKE SA
+   or any of its Child SAs recently, the system needs to perform a
+   liveness check in order to prevent sending messages to a dead peer.
+   (This is sometimes called "dead peer detection" or "DPD", although it
+   is really detecting live peers, not dead ones.)  Receipt of a fresh
+   cryptographically protected message on an IKE SA or any of its Child
+   SAs ensures liveness of the IKE SA and all of its Child SAs.  Note
+   that this places requirements on the failure modes of an IKE
+   endpoint.  An implementation MUST NOT continue sending on any SA if
+   some failure prevents it from receiving on all of the associated SAs.
+   If Child SAs can fail independently from one another without the
+   associated IKE SA being able to send a delete message, then they MUST
+   be negotiated by separate IKE SAs.
+
+   There is a Denial of Service attack on the initiator of an IKE SA
+   that can be avoided if the initiator takes the proper care.  Since
+   the first two messages of an SA setup are not cryptographically
+   protected, an attacker could respond to the initiator's message
+   before the genuine responder and poison the connection setup attempt.
+   To prevent this, the initiator MAY be willing to accept multiple
+   responses to its first message, treat each as potentially legitimate,
+   respond to it, and then discard all the invalid half-open connections
+   when it receives a valid cryptographically protected response to any
+   one of its requests.  Once a cryptographically valid response is
+   received, all subsequent responses should be ignored whether or not
+   they are cryptographically valid.
+
+   Note that with these rules, there is no reason to negotiate and agree
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 25]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   upon an SA lifetime.  If IKE presumes the partner is dead, based on
+   repeated lack of acknowledgement to an IKE message, then the IKE SA
+   and all Child SAs set up through that IKE SA are deleted.
+
+   An IKE endpoint may at any time delete inactive Child SAs to recover
+   resources used to hold their state.  If an IKE endpoint chooses to
+   delete Child SAs, it MUST send Delete payloads to the other end
+   notifying it of the deletion.  It MAY similarly time out the IKE SA.
+   {{ Clarified the SHOULD }} Closing the IKE SA implicitly closes all
+   associated Child SAs.  In this case, an IKE endpoint SHOULD send a
+   Delete payload indicating that it has closed the IKE SA unless the
+   other endpoint is no longer responding.
+
+2.5.  Version Numbers and Forward Compatibility
+
+   This document describes version 2.0 of IKE, meaning the major version
+   number is 2 and the minor version number is 0. {{ Restated the
+   relationship to RFC 4306 }} This document is a replacement for
+   [IKEV2].  It is likely that some implementations will want to support
+   version 1.0 and version 2.0, and in the future, other versions.
+
+   The major version number should be incremented only if the packet
+   formats or required actions have changed so dramatically that an
+   older version node would not be able to interoperate with a newer
+   version node if it simply ignored the fields it did not understand
+   and took the actions specified in the older specification.  The minor
+   version number indicates new capabilities, and MUST be ignored by a
+   node with a smaller minor version number, but used for informational
+   purposes by the node with the larger minor version number.  For
+   example, it might indicate the ability to process a newly defined
+   notification message.  The node with the larger minor version number
+   would simply note that its correspondent would not be able to
+   understand that message and therefore would not send it.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-5 }} If an endpoint receives a message with a higher major
+   version number, it MUST drop the message and SHOULD send an
+   unauthenticated notification message of type INVALID_MAJOR_VERSION
+   containing the highest (closest) version number it supports.  If an
+   endpoint supports major version n, and major version m, it MUST
+   support all versions between n and m.  If it receives a message with
+   a major version that it supports, it MUST respond with that version
+   number.  In order to prevent two nodes from being tricked into
+   corresponding with a lower major version number than the maximum that
+   they both support, IKE has a flag that indicates that the node is
+   capable of speaking a higher major version number.
+
+   Thus, the major version number in the IKE header indicates the
+   version number of the message, not the highest version number that
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 26]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   the transmitter supports.  If the initiator is capable of speaking
+   versions n, n+1, and n+2, and the responder is capable of speaking
+   versions n and n+1, then they will negotiate speaking n+1, where the
+   initiator will set a flag indicating its ability to speak a higher
+   version.  If they mistakenly (perhaps through an active attacker
+   sending error messages) negotiate to version n, then both will notice
+   that the other side can support a higher version number, and they
+   MUST break the connection and reconnect using version n+1.
+
+   Note that IKEv1 does not follow these rules, because there is no way
+   in v1 of noting that you are capable of speaking a higher version
+   number.  So an active attacker can trick two v2-capable nodes into
+   speaking v1. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} When a v2-capable node
+   negotiates down to v1, it should note that fact in its logs.
+
+   Also for forward compatibility, all fields marked RESERVED MUST be
+   set to zero by an implementation running version 2.0, and their
+   content MUST be ignored by an implementation running version 2.0 ("Be
+   conservative in what you send and liberal in what you receive").  In
+   this way, future versions of the protocol can use those fields in a
+   way that is guaranteed to be ignored by implementations that do not
+   understand them.  Similarly, payload types that are not defined are
+   reserved for future use; implementations of a version where they are
+   undefined MUST skip over those payloads and ignore their contents.
+
+   IKEv2 adds a "critical" flag to each payload header for further
+   flexibility for forward compatibility.  If the critical flag is set
+   and the payload type is unrecognized, the message MUST be rejected
+   and the response to the IKE request containing that payload MUST
+   include a Notify payload UNSUPPORTED_CRITICAL_PAYLOAD, indicating an
+   unsupported critical payload was included. {{ 3.10.1-1 }} In that
+   Notify payload, the notification data contains the one-octet payload
+   type.  If the critical flag is not set and the payload type is
+   unsupported, that payload MUST be ignored.  Payloads sent in IKE
+   response messages MUST NOT have the critical flag set.  Note that the
+   critical flag applies only to the payload type, not the contents.  If
+   the payload type is recognized, but the payload contains something
+   which is not (such as an unknown transform inside an SA payload, or
+   an unknown Notify Message Type inside a Notify payload), the critical
+   flag is ignored.
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD in the second clause }}Although new payload
+   types may be added in the future and may appear interleaved with the
+   fields defined in this specification, implementations MUST send the
+   payloads defined in this specification in the order shown in the
+   figures in Section 2; implementations are explicitly allowed to
+   reject as invalid a message with those payloads in any other order.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 27]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+2.6.  IKE SA SPIs and Cookies
+
+   The term "cookies" originates with Karn and Simpson [PHOTURIS] in
+   Photuris, an early proposal for key management with IPsec, and it has
+   persisted.  The Internet Security Association and Key Management
+   Protocol (ISAKMP) [ISAKMP] fixed message header includes two eight-
+   octet fields titled "cookies", and that syntax is used by both IKEv1
+   and IKEv2, although in IKEv2 they are referred to as the "IKE SPI"
+   and there is a new separate field in a Notify payload holding the
+   cookie.  The initial two eight-octet fields in the header are used as
+   a connection identifier at the beginning of IKE packets.  Each
+   endpoint chooses one of the two SPIs and MUST choose them so as to be
+   unique identifiers of an IKE SA.  An SPI value of zero is special and
+   indicates that the remote SPI value is not yet known by the sender.
+
+   Incoming IKE packets are mapped to an IKE SA only using the packet's
+   SPI, not using (for example) the source IP address of the packet.
+
+   Unlike ESP and AH where only the recipient's SPI appears in the
+   header of a message, in IKE the sender's SPI is also sent in every
+   message.  Since the SPI chosen by the original initiator of the IKE
+   SA is always sent first, an endpoint with multiple IKE SAs open that
+   wants to find the appropriate IKE SA using the SPI it assigned must
+   look at the I(nitiator) Flag bit in the header to determine whether
+   it assigned the first or the second eight octets.
+
+   In the first message of an initial IKE exchange, the initiator will
+   not know the responder's SPI value and will therefore set that field
+   to zero.
+
+   An expected attack against IKE is state and CPU exhaustion, where the
+   target is flooded with session initiation requests from forged IP
+   addresses.  This attack can be made less effective if an
+   implementation of a responder uses minimal CPU and commits no state
+   to an SA until it knows the initiator can receive packets at the
+   address from which it claims to be sending them.
+
+   When a responder detects a large number of half-open IKE SAs, it
+   SHOULD reply to IKE_SA_INIT requests with a response containing the
+   COOKIE notification. {{ 3.10.1-16390 }} The data associated with this
+   notification MUST be between 1 and 64 octets in length (inclusive),
+   and its generation is described later in this section.  If the
+   IKE_SA_INIT response includes the COOKIE notification, the initiator
+   MUST then retry the IKE_SA_INIT request, and include the COOKIE
+   notification containing the received data as the first payload, and
+   all other payloads unchanged.  The initial exchange will then be as
+   follows:
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 28]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR(A,0), SAi1, KEi, Ni  -->
+                                <--  HDR(A,0), N(COOKIE)
+   HDR(A,0), N(COOKIE), SAi1,
+       KEi, Ni  -->
+                                <--  HDR(A,B), SAr1, KEr,
+                                         Nr, [CERTREQ]
+   HDR(A,B), SK {IDi, [CERT,]
+       [CERTREQ,] [IDr,] AUTH,
+       SAi2, TSi, TSr}  -->
+                                <--  HDR(A,B), SK {IDr, [CERT,]
+                                         AUTH, SAr2, TSi, TSr}
+
+   The first two messages do not affect any initiator or responder state
+   except for communicating the cookie.  In particular, the message
+   sequence numbers in the first four messages will all be zero and the
+   message sequence numbers in the last two messages will be one.  'A'
+   is the SPI assigned by the initiator, while 'B' is the SPI assigned
+   by the responder.
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} An IKE implementation can implement its
+   responder cookie generation in such a way as to not require any saved
+   state to recognize its valid cookie when the second IKE_SA_INIT
+   message arrives.  The exact algorithms and syntax they use to
+   generate cookies do not affect interoperability and hence are not
+   specified here.  The following is an example of how an endpoint could
+   use cookies to implement limited DOS protection.
+
+   A good way to do this is to set the responder cookie to be:
+
+   Cookie = <VersionIDofSecret> | Hash(Ni | IPi | SPIi | <secret>)
+
+   where <secret> is a randomly generated secret known only to the
+   responder and periodically changed and | indicates concatenation.
+   <VersionIDofSecret> should be changed whenever <secret> is
+   regenerated.  The cookie can be recomputed when the IKE_SA_INIT
+   arrives the second time and compared to the cookie in the received
+   message.  If it matches, the responder knows that the cookie was
+   generated since the last change to <secret> and that IPi must be the
+   same as the source address it saw the first time.  Incorporating SPIi
+   into the calculation ensures that if multiple IKE SAs are being set
+   up in parallel they will all get different cookies (assuming the
+   initiator chooses unique SPIi's).  Incorporating Ni into the hash
+   ensures that an attacker who sees only message 2 can't successfully
+   forge a message 3.
+
+   If a new value for <secret> is chosen while there are connections in
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 29]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   the process of being initialized, an IKE_SA_INIT might be returned
+   with other than the current <VersionIDofSecret>.  The responder in
+   that case MAY reject the message by sending another response with a
+   new cookie or it MAY keep the old value of <secret> around for a
+   short time and accept cookies computed from either one. {{ Demoted
+   the SHOULD NOT }} The responder should not accept cookies
+   indefinitely after <secret> is changed, since that would defeat part
+   of the denial of service protection. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} The
+   responder should change the value of <secret> frequently, especially
+   if under attack.
+
+   {{ Clarif-2.1 }} In addition to cookies, there are several cases
+   where the IKE_SA_INIT exchange does not result in the creation of an
+   IKE SA (such as INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD or NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN).  In such a
+   case, sending a zero value for the Responder's SPI is correct.  If
+   the responder sends a non-zero responder SPI, the initiator should
+   not reject the response for only that reason.
+
+   {{ Clarif-2.5 }} When one party receives an IKE_SA_INIT request
+   containing a cookie whose contents do not match the value expected,
+   that party MUST ignore the cookie and process the message as if no
+   cookie had been included; usually this means sending a response
+   containing a new cookie.  The initiator should limit the number of
+   cookie exchanges it tries before giving up.  An attacker can forge
+   multiple cookie responses to the initiator's IKE_SA_INIT message, and
+   each of those forged cookie reply will trigger two packets: one
+   packet from the initiator to the responder (which will reject those
+   cookies), and one reply from responder to initiator that includes the
+   correct cookie.
+
+2.6.1.  Interaction of COOKIE and INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD
+
+   {{ This section added by Clarif-2.4 }}
+
+   There are two common reasons why the initiator may have to retry the
+   IKE_SA_INIT exchange: the responder requests a cookie or wants a
+   different Diffie-Hellman group than was included in the KEi payload.
+   If the initiator receives a cookie from the responder, the initiator
+   needs to decide whether or not to include the cookie in only the next
+   retry of the IKE_SA_INIT request, or in all subsequent retries as
+   well.
+
+   If the initiator includes the cookie only in the next retry, one
+   additional roundtrip may be needed in some cases.  An additional
+   roundtrip is needed also if the initiator includes the cookie in all
+   retries, but the responder does not support this.  For instance, if
+   the responder includes the SAi1 and KEi payloads in cookie
+   calculation, it will reject the request by sending a new cookie.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 30]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   If both peers support including the cookie in all retries, a slightly
+   shorter exchange can happen.
+
+   Initiator                   Responder
+   -----------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR(A,0), SAi1, KEi, Ni -->
+                           <-- HDR(A,0), N(COOKIE)
+   HDR(A,0), N(COOKIE), SAi1, KEi, Ni  -->
+                           <-- HDR(A,0), N(INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD)
+   HDR(A,0), N(COOKIE), SAi1, KEi', Ni -->
+                           <-- HDR(A,B), SAr1, KEr, Nr
+
+   Implementations SHOULD support this shorter exchange, but MUST NOT
+   fail if other implementations do not support this shorter exchange.
+
+2.7.  Cryptographic Algorithm Negotiation
+
+   The payload type known as "SA" indicates a proposal for a set of
+   choices of IPsec protocols (IKE, ESP, or AH) for the SA as well as
+   cryptographic algorithms associated with each protocol.
+
+   An SA payload consists of one or more proposals. {{ Clarif-7.13 }}
+   Each proposal includes one protocol.  Each protocol contains one or
+   more transforms -- each specifying a cryptographic algorithm.  Each
+   transform contains zero or more attributes (attributes are needed
+   only if the transform identifier does not completely specify the
+   cryptographic algorithm).
+
+   This hierarchical structure was designed to efficiently encode
+   proposals for cryptographic suites when the number of supported
+   suites is large because multiple values are acceptable for multiple
+   transforms.  The responder MUST choose a single suite, which may be
+   any subset of the SA proposal following the rules below:
+
+   {{ Clarif-7.13 }} Each proposal contains one protocol.  If a proposal
+   is accepted, the SA response MUST contain the same protocol.  The
+   responder MUST accept a single proposal or reject them all and return
+   an error. {{ 3.10.1-14 }} The error is given in a notification of
+   type NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN.
+
+   Each IPsec protocol proposal contains one or more transforms.  Each
+   transform contains a transform type.  The accepted cryptographic
+   suite MUST contain exactly one transform of each type included in the
+   proposal.  For example: if an ESP proposal includes transforms
+   ENCR_3DES, ENCR_AES w/keysize 128, ENCR_AES w/keysize 256,
+   AUTH_HMAC_MD5, and AUTH_HMAC_SHA, the accepted suite MUST contain one
+   of the ENCR_ transforms and one of the AUTH_ transforms.  Thus, six
+   combinations are acceptable.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 31]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   If an initiator proposes both normal ciphers with integrity
+   protection as well as combined-mode ciphers, then two proposals are
+   needed.  One of the proposals includes the normal ciphers with the
+   integrity algoritms for them, and the other proposal includes all the
+   combined mode ciphers without the integrity algorithms (because
+   combined mode ciphers are not allowed to have any integrity algorithm
+   other than "none").
+
+   Since the initiator sends its Diffie-Hellman value in the
+   IKE_SA_INIT, it must guess the Diffie-Hellman group that the
+   responder will select from its list of supported groups.  If the
+   initiator guesses wrong, the responder will respond with a Notify
+   payload of type INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD indicating the selected group.  In
+   this case, the initiator MUST retry the IKE_SA_INIT with the
+   corrected Diffie-Hellman group.  The initiator MUST again propose its
+   full set of acceptable cryptographic suites because the rejection
+   message was unauthenticated and otherwise an active attacker could
+   trick the endpoints into negotiating a weaker suite than a stronger
+   one that they both prefer.
+
+   {{ Clarif-2.1 }} When the IKE_SA_INIT exchange does not result in the
+   creation of an IKE SA due to INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD, NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN,
+   or COOKIE (see Section 2.6), the responder's SPI will be zero.
+   However, if the responder sends a non-zero responder SPI, the
+   initiator should not reject the response for only that reason.
+
+2.8.  Rekeying
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} IKE, ESP, and AH security associations use
+   secret keys that should be used only for a limited amount of time and
+   to protect a limited amount of data.  This limits the lifetime of the
+   entire security association.  When the lifetime of a security
+   association expires, the security association MUST NOT be used.  If
+   there is demand, new security associations MAY be established.
+   Reestablishment of security associations to take the place of ones
+   that expire is referred to as "rekeying".
+
+   To allow for minimal IPsec implementations, the ability to rekey SAs
+   without restarting the entire IKE SA is optional.  An implementation
+   MAY refuse all CREATE_CHILD_SA requests within an IKE SA.  If an SA
+   has expired or is about to expire and rekeying attempts using the
+   mechanisms described here fail, an implementation MUST close the IKE
+   SA and any associated Child SAs and then MAY start new ones. {{
+   Demoted the SHOULD }} Implementations may wish to support in-place
+   rekeying of SAs, since doing so offers better performance and is
+   likely to reduce the number of packets lost during the transition.
+
+   To rekey a Child SA within an existing IKE SA, create a new,
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 32]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   equivalent SA (see Section 2.17 below), and when the new one is
+   established, delete the old one.  To rekey an IKE SA, establish a new
+   equivalent IKE SA (see Section 2.18 below) with the peer to whom the
+   old IKE SA is shared using a CREATE_CHILD_SA within the existing IKE
+   SA.  An IKE SA so created inherits all of the original IKE SA's Child
+   SAs, and the new IKE SA is used for all control messages needed to
+   maintain those Child SAs.  The old IKE SA is then deleted, and the
+   Delete payload to delete itself MUST be the last request sent over
+   the old IKE SA.  Note that, when rekeying, the new Child SA MAY have
+   different traffic selectors and algorithms than the old one.
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} SAs should be rekeyed proactively, i.e., the
+   new SA should be established before the old one expires and becomes
+   unusable.  Enough time should elapse between the time the new SA is
+   established and the old one becomes unusable so that traffic can be
+   switched over to the new SA.
+
+   A difference between IKEv1 and IKEv2 is that in IKEv1 SA lifetimes
+   were negotiated.  In IKEv2, each end of the SA is responsible for
+   enforcing its own lifetime policy on the SA and rekeying the SA when
+   necessary.  If the two ends have different lifetime policies, the end
+   with the shorter lifetime will end up always being the one to request
+   the rekeying.  If an SA has been inactive for a long time and if an
+   endpoint would not initiate the SA in the absence of traffic, the
+   endpoint MAY choose to close the SA instead of rekeying it when its
+   lifetime expires. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} It should do so if there
+   has been no traffic since the last time the SA was rekeyed.
+
+   Note that IKEv2 deliberately allows parallel SAs with the same
+   traffic selectors between common endpoints.  One of the purposes of
+   this is to support traffic quality of service (QoS) differences among
+   the SAs (see [DIFFSERVFIELD], [DIFFSERVARCH], and section 4.1 of
+   [DIFFTUNNEL]).  Hence unlike IKEv1, the combination of the endpoints
+   and the traffic selectors may not uniquely identify an SA between
+   those endpoints, so the IKEv1 rekeying heuristic of deleting SAs on
+   the basis of duplicate traffic selectors SHOULD NOT be used.
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} The node that initiated the surviving
+   rekeyed SA should delete the replaced SA after the new one is
+   established.
+
+   There are timing windows -- particularly in the presence of lost
+   packets -- where endpoints may not agree on the state of an SA.  The
+   responder to a CREATE_CHILD_SA MUST be prepared to accept messages on
+   an SA before sending its response to the creation request, so there
+   is no ambiguity for the initiator.  The initiator MAY begin sending
+   on an SA as soon as it processes the response.  The initiator,
+   however, cannot receive on a newly created SA until it receives and
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 33]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   processes the response to its CREATE_CHILD_SA request.  How, then, is
+   the responder to know when it is OK to send on the newly created SA?
+
+   From a technical correctness and interoperability perspective, the
+   responder MAY begin sending on an SA as soon as it sends its response
+   to the CREATE_CHILD_SA request.  In some situations, however, this
+   could result in packets unnecessarily being dropped, so an
+   implementation MAY defer such sending.
+
+   The responder can be assured that the initiator is prepared to
+   receive messages on an SA if either (1) it has received a
+   cryptographically valid message on the new SA, or (2) the new SA
+   rekeys an existing SA and it receives an IKE request to close the
+   replaced SA.  When rekeying an SA, the responder continues to send
+   traffic on the old SA until one of those events occurs.  When
+   establishing a new SA, the responder MAY defer sending messages on a
+   new SA until either it receives one or a timeout has occurred. {{
+   Demoted the SHOULD }} If an initiator receives a message on an SA for
+   which it has not received a response to its CREATE_CHILD_SA request,
+   it interprets that as a likely packet loss and retransmits the
+   CREATE_CHILD_SA request.  An initiator MAY send a dummy message on a
+   newly created SA if it has no messages queued in order to assure the
+   responder that the initiator is ready to receive messages.
+
+2.8.1.  Simultaneous Child SA rekeying
+
+   {{ The first two paragraphs were moved, and the rest was added, based
+   on Clarif-5.11 }}
+
+   If the two ends have the same lifetime policies, it is possible that
+   both will initiate a rekeying at the same time (which will result in
+   redundant SAs).  To reduce the probability of this happening, the
+   timing of rekeying requests SHOULD be jittered (delayed by a random
+   amount of time after the need for rekeying is noticed).
+
+   This form of rekeying may temporarily result in multiple similar SAs
+   between the same pairs of nodes.  When there are two SAs eligible to
+   receive packets, a node MUST accept incoming packets through either
+   SA.  If redundant SAs are created though such a collision, the SA
+   created with the lowest of the four nonces used in the two exchanges
+   SHOULD be closed by the endpoint that created it. {{ Clarif-5.10 }}
+   "Lowest" means an octet-by-octet, lexicographical comparison (instead
+   of, for instance, comparing the nonces as large integers).  In other
+   words, start by comparing the first octet; if they're equal, move to
+   the next octet, and so on.  If you reach the end of one nonce, that
+   nonce is the lower one.
+
+   The following is an explanation on the impact this has on
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 34]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   implementations.  Assume that hosts A and B have an existing IPsec SA
+   pair with SPIs (SPIa1,SPIb1), and both start rekeying it at the same
+   time:
+
+   Host A                            Host B
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   send req1: N(REKEY_SA,SPIa1),
+       SA(..,SPIa2,..),Ni1,..  -->
+                                <--  send req2: N(REKEY_SA,SPIb1),
+                                         SA(..,SPIb2,..),Ni2
+   recv req2 <--
+
+   At this point, A knows there is a simultaneous rekeying going on.
+   However, it cannot yet know which of the exchanges will have the
+   lowest nonce, so it will just note the situation and respond as
+   usual.
+
+   send resp2: SA(..,SPIa3,..),
+        Nr1,..  -->
+                                -->  recv req1
+
+   Now B also knows that simultaneous rekeying is going on.  It responds
+   as usual.
+
+                               <--  send resp1: SA(..,SPIb3,..),
+                                        Nr2,..
+   recv resp1 <--
+                               -->  recv resp2
+
+   At this point, there are three Child SA pairs between A and B (the
+   old one and two new ones).  A and B can now compare the nonces.
+   Suppose that the lowest nonce was Nr1 in message resp2; in this case,
+   B (the sender of req2) deletes the redundant new SA, and A (the node
+   that initiated the surviving rekeyed SA), deletes the old one.
+
+   send req3: D(SPIa1) -->
+                                <--  send req4: D(SPIb2)
+                                -->  recv req3
+                                <--  send resp3: D(SPIb1)
+   recv req4 <--
+   send resp4: D(SPIa3) -->
+
+   The rekeying is now finished.
+
+   However, there is a second possible sequence of events that can
+   happen if some packets are lost in the network, resulting in
+   retransmissions.  The rekeying begins as usual, but A's first packet
+   (req1) is lost.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 35]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Host A                            Host B
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   send req1: N(REKEY_SA,SPIa1),
+       SA(..,SPIa2,..),
+       Ni1,..  -->  (lost)
+                                <--  send req2: N(REKEY_SA,SPIb1),
+                                         SA(..,SPIb2,..),Ni2
+   recv req2 <--
+   send resp2: SA(..,SPIa3,..),
+       Nr1,.. -->
+                                -->  recv resp2
+                                <--  send req3: D(SPIb1)
+   recv req3 <--
+   send resp3: D(SPIa1) -->
+                                -->  recv resp3
+
+   From B's point of view, the rekeying is now completed, and since it
+   has not yet received A's req1, it does not even know that there was
+   simultaneous rekeying.  However, A will continue retransmitting the
+   message, and eventually it will reach B.
+
+   resend req1 -->
+                                -->  recv req1
+
+   To B, it looks like A is trying to rekey an SA that no longer exists;
+   thus, B responds to the request with something non-fatal such as
+   NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN.
+
+                                <--  send resp1: N(NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN)
+   recv resp1 <--
+
+   When A receives this error, it already knows there was simultaneous
+   rekeying, so it can ignore the error message.
+
+2.8.2.   Rekeying the IKE SA Versus Reauthentication
+
+   {{ Added this section from Clarif-5.2 }}
+
+   Rekeying the IKE SA and reauthentication are different concepts in
+   IKEv2.  Rekeying the IKE SA establishes new keys for the IKE SA and
+   resets the Message ID counters, but it does not authenticate the
+   parties again (no AUTH or EAP payloads are involved).
+
+   Although rekeying the IKE SA may be important in some environments,
+   reauthentication (the verification that the parties still have access
+   to the long-term credentials) is often more important.
+
+   IKEv2 does not have any special support for reauthentication.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 36]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Reauthentication is done by creating a new IKE SA from scratch (using
+   IKE_SA_INIT/IKE_AUTH exchanges, without any REKEY_SA notify
+   payloads), creating new Child SAs within the new IKE SA (without
+   REKEY_SA notify payloads), and finally deleting the old IKE SA (which
+   deletes the old Child SAs as well).
+
+   This means that reauthentication also establishes new keys for the
+   IKE SA and Child SAs.  Therefore, while rekeying can be performed
+   more often than reauthentication, the situation where "authentication
+   lifetime" is shorter than "key lifetime" does not make sense.
+
+   While creation of a new IKE SA can be initiated by either party
+   (initiator or responder in the original IKE SA), the use of EAP
+   authentication and/or configuration payloads means in practice that
+   reauthentication has to be initiated by the same party as the
+   original IKE SA.  IKEv2 does not currently allow the responder to
+   request reauthentication in this case; however, there are extensions
+   that add this functionality such as [REAUTH].
+
+2.9.  Traffic Selector Negotiation
+
+   {{ Clarif-7.2 }} When an RFC4301-compliant IPsec subsystem receives
+   an IP packet that matches a "protect" selector in its Security Policy
+   Database (SPD), the subsystem protects that packet with IPsec.  When
+   no SA exists yet, it is the task of IKE to create it.  Maintenance of
+   a system's SPD is outside the scope of IKE (see [PFKEY] for an
+   example protocol, although it only applies to IKEv1), though some
+   implementations might update their SPD in connection with the running
+   of IKE (for an example scenario, see Section 1.1.3).
+
+   Traffic Selector (TS) payloads allow endpoints to communicate some of
+   the information from their SPD to their peers.  TS payloads specify
+   the selection criteria for packets that will be forwarded over the
+   newly set up SA.  This can serve as a consistency check in some
+   scenarios to assure that the SPDs are consistent.  In others, it
+   guides the dynamic update of the SPD.
+
+   Two TS payloads appear in each of the messages in the exchange that
+   creates a Child SA pair.  Each TS payload contains one or more
+   Traffic Selectors.  Each Traffic Selector consists of an address
+   range (IPv4 or IPv6), a port range, and an IP protocol ID.
+
+   The first of the two TS payloads is known as TSi (Traffic Selector-
+   initiator).  The second is known as TSr (Traffic Selector-responder).
+   TSi specifies the source address of traffic forwarded from (or the
+   destination address of traffic forwarded to) the initiator of the
+   Child SA pair.  TSr specifies the destination address of the traffic
+   forwarded to (or the source address of the traffic forwarded from)
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 37]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   the responder of the Child SA pair.  For example, if the original
+   initiator requests the creation of a Child SA pair, and wishes to
+   tunnel all traffic from subnet 192.0.1.* on the initiator's side to
+   subnet 192.0.2.* on the responder's side, the initiator would include
+   a single traffic selector in each TS payload.  TSi would specify the
+   address range (192.0.1.0 - 192.0.1.255) and TSr would specify the
+   address range (192.0.2.0 - 192.0.2.255).  Assuming that proposal was
+   acceptable to the responder, it would send identical TS payloads
+   back.  (Note: The IP address range 192.0.2.* has been reserved for
+   use in examples in RFCs and similar documents.  This document needed
+   two such ranges, and so also used 192.0.1.*.  This should not be
+   confused with any actual address.)
+
+   IKEv2 allows the responder to choose a subset of the traffic proposed
+   by the initiator.  This could happen when the configurations of the
+   two endpoints are being updated but only one end has received the new
+   information.  Since the two endpoints may be configured by different
+   people, the incompatibility may persist for an extended period even
+   in the absence of errors.  It also allows for intentionally different
+   configurations, as when one end is configured to tunnel all addresses
+   and depends on the other end to have the up-to-date list.
+
+   When the responder chooses a subset of the traffic proposed by the
+   initiator, it narrows the traffic selectors to some subset of the
+   initiator's proposal (provided the set does not become the null set).
+   If the type of traffic selector proposed is unknown, the responder
+   ignores that traffic selector, so that the unknown type is not be
+   returned in the narrowed set.
+
+   To enable the responder to choose the appropriate range in this case,
+   if the initiator has requested the SA due to a data packet, the
+   initiator SHOULD include as the first traffic selector in each of TSi
+   and TSr a very specific traffic selector including the addresses in
+   the packet triggering the request.  In the example, the initiator
+   would include in TSi two traffic selectors: the first containing the
+   address range (192.0.1.43 - 192.0.1.43) and the source port and IP
+   protocol from the packet and the second containing (192.0.1.0 -
+   192.0.1.255) with all ports and IP protocols.  The initiator would
+   similarly include two traffic selectors in TSr.  If the initiator
+   creates the Child SA pair not in response to an arriving packet, but
+   rather, say, upon startup, then there may be no specific addresses
+   the initiator prefers for the initial tunnel over any other.  In that
+   case, the first values in TSi and TSr can be ranges rather than
+   specific values.
+
+   The responder performs the narrowing as follows: {{ Clarif-4.10 }}
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 38]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  If the responder's policy does not allow it to accept any part of
+      the proposed traffic selectors, it responds with TS_UNACCEPTABLE.
+
+   o  If the responder's policy allows the entire set of traffic covered
+      by TSi and TSr, no narrowing is necessary, and the responder can
+      return the same TSi and TSr values.
+
+   o  If the responder's policy allows it to accept the first selector
+      of TSi and TSr, then the responder MUST narrow the traffic
+      selectors to a subset that includes the initiator's first choices.
+      In this example above, the responder might respond with TSi being
+      (192.0.1.43 - 192.0.1.43) with all ports and IP protocols.
+
+   o  If the responder's policy does not allow it to accept the first
+      selector of TSi and TSr, the responder narrows to an acceptable
+      subset of TSi and TSr.
+
+   When narrowing is done, there may be several subsets that are
+   acceptable but their union is not.  In this case, the responder
+   arbitrarily chooses one of them, and MAY include an
+   ADDITIONAL_TS_POSSIBLE notification in the response. {{ 3.10.1-16386
+   }} The ADDITIONAL_TS_POSSIBLE notification asserts that the responder
+   narrowed the proposed traffic selectors but that other traffic
+   selectors would also have been acceptable, though only in a separate
+   SA.  There is no data associated with this Notify type.  This case
+   will occur only when the initiator and responder are configured
+   differently from one another.  If the initiator and responder agree
+   on the granularity of tunnels, the initiator will never request a
+   tunnel wider than the responder will accept. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }}
+   Such misconfigurations should be recorded in error logs.
+
+   It is possible for the responder's policy to contain multiple smaller
+   ranges, all encompassed by the initiator's traffic selector, and with
+   the responder's policy being that each of those ranges should be sent
+   over a different SA.  Continuing the example above, the responder
+   might have a policy of being willing to tunnel those addresses to and
+   from the initiator, but might require that each address pair be on a
+   separately negotiated Child SA.  If the initiator generated its
+   request in response to an incoming packet from 192.0.1.43 to
+   192.0.2.123, there would be no way for the responder to determine
+   which pair of addresses should be included in this tunnel, and it
+   would have to make a guess or reject the request with a status of
+   SINGLE_PAIR_REQUIRED.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-34 }} The SINGLE_PAIR_REQUIRED error indicates that a
+   CREATE_CHILD_SA request is unacceptable because its sender is only
+   willing to accept traffic selectors specifying a single pair of
+   addresses.  The requestor is expected to respond by requesting an SA
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 39]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   for only the specific traffic it is trying to forward.
+
+   {{ Clarif-4.11 }} Few implementations will have policies that require
+   separate SAs for each address pair.  Because of this, if only some
+   parts of the TSi and TSr proposed by the initiator are acceptable to
+   the responder, responders SHOULD narrow the selectors to an
+   acceptable subset rather than use SINGLE_PAIR_REQUIRED.
+
+2.9.1.  Traffic Selectors Violating Own Policy
+
+   {{ Clarif-4.12 }}
+
+   When creating a new SA, the initiator needs to avoid proposing
+   traffic selectors that violate its own policy.  If this rule is not
+   followed, valid traffic may be dropped.  If you use decorrelated
+   policies from [IPSECARCH], this kind of policy violations cannot
+   happen.
+
+   This is best illustrated by an example.  Suppose that host A has a
+   policy whose effect is that traffic to 192.0.1.66 is sent via host B
+   encrypted using AES, and traffic to all other hosts in 192.0.1.0/24
+   is also sent via B, but must use 3DES.  Suppose also that host B
+   accepts any combination of AES and 3DES.
+
+   If host A now proposes an SA that uses 3DES, and includes TSr
+   containing (192.0.1.0-192.0.1.255), this will be accepted by host B.
+   Now, host B can also use this SA to send traffic from 192.0.1.66, but
+   those packets will be dropped by A since it requires the use of AES
+   for those traffic.  Even if host A creates a new SA only for
+   192.0.1.66 that uses AES, host B may freely continue to use the first
+   SA for the traffic.  In this situation, when proposing the SA, host A
+   should have followed its own policy, and included a TSr containing
+   ((192.0.1.0-192.0.1.65),(192.0.1.67-192.0.1.255)) instead.
+
+   In general, if (1) the initiator makes a proposal "for traffic X
+   (TSi/TSr), do SA", and (2) for some subset X' of X, the initiator
+   does not actually accept traffic X' with SA, and (3) the initiator
+   would be willing to accept traffic X' with some SA' (!=SA), valid
+   traffic can be unnecessarily dropped since the responder can apply
+   either SA or SA' to traffic X'.
+
+2.10.  Nonces
+
+   The IKE_SA_INIT messages each contain a nonce.  These nonces are used
+   as inputs to cryptographic functions.  The CREATE_CHILD_SA request
+   and the CREATE_CHILD_SA response also contain nonces.  These nonces
+   are used to add freshness to the key derivation technique used to
+   obtain keys for Child SA, and to ensure creation of strong pseudo-
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 40]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   random bits from the Diffie-Hellman key.  Nonces used in IKEv2 MUST
+   be randomly chosen, MUST be at least 128 bits in size, and MUST be at
+   least half the key size of the negotiated prf. ("prf" refers to
+   "pseudo-random function", one of the cryptographic algorithms
+   negotiated in the IKE exchange.) {{ Clarif-7.4 }} However, the
+   initiator chooses the nonce before the outcome of the negotiation is
+   known.  Because of that, the nonce has to be long enough for all the
+   PRFs being proposed.  If the same random number source is used for
+   both keys and nonces, care must be taken to ensure that the latter
+   use does not compromise the former.
+
+2.11.  Address and Port Agility
+
+   IKE runs over UDP ports 500 and 4500, and implicitly sets up ESP and
+   AH associations for the same IP addresses it runs over.  The IP
+   addresses and ports in the outer header are, however, not themselves
+   cryptographically protected, and IKE is designed to work even through
+   Network Address Translation (NAT) boxes.  An implementation MUST
+   accept incoming requests even if the source port is not 500 or 4500,
+   and MUST respond to the address and port from which the request was
+   received.  It MUST specify the address and port at which the request
+   was received as the source address and port in the response.  IKE
+   functions identically over IPv4 or IPv6.
+
+2.12.  Reuse of Diffie-Hellman Exponentials
+
+   IKE generates keying material using an ephemeral Diffie-Hellman
+   exchange in order to gain the property of "perfect forward secrecy".
+   This means that once a connection is closed and its corresponding
+   keys are forgotten, even someone who has recorded all of the data
+   from the connection and gets access to all of the long-term keys of
+   the two endpoints cannot reconstruct the keys used to protect the
+   conversation without doing a brute force search of the session key
+   space.
+
+   Achieving perfect forward secrecy requires that when a connection is
+   closed, each endpoint MUST forget not only the keys used by the
+   connection but also any information that could be used to recompute
+   those keys.
+
+   Since the computing of Diffie-Hellman exponentials is computationally
+   expensive, an endpoint may find it advantageous to reuse those
+   exponentials for multiple connection setups.  There are several
+   reasonable strategies for doing this.  An endpoint could choose a new
+   exponential only periodically though this could result in less-than-
+   perfect forward secrecy if some connection lasts for less than the
+   lifetime of the exponential.  Or it could keep track of which
+   exponential was used for each connection and delete the information
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 41]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   associated with the exponential only when some corresponding
+   connection was closed.  This would allow the exponential to be reused
+   without losing perfect forward secrecy at the cost of maintaining
+   more state.
+
+   Decisions as to whether and when to reuse Diffie-Hellman exponentials
+   is a private decision in the sense that it will not affect
+   interoperability.  An implementation that reuses exponentials MAY
+   choose to remember the exponential used by the other endpoint on past
+   exchanges and if one is reused to avoid the second half of the
+   calculation.
+
+2.13.  Generating Keying Material
+
+   In the context of the IKE SA, four cryptographic algorithms are
+   negotiated: an encryption algorithm, an integrity protection
+   algorithm, a Diffie-Hellman group, and a pseudo-random function
+   (prf).  The pseudo-random function is used for the construction of
+   keying material for all of the cryptographic algorithms used in both
+   the IKE SA and the Child SAs.
+
+   We assume that each encryption algorithm and integrity protection
+   algorithm uses a fixed-size key and that any randomly chosen value of
+   that fixed size can serve as an appropriate key.  For algorithms that
+   accept a variable length key, a fixed key size MUST be specified as
+   part of the cryptographic transform negotiated (see Section 3.3.5 for
+   the defintion of the Key Length transform attribute).  For algorithms
+   for which not all values are valid keys (such as DES or 3DES with key
+   parity), the algorithm by which keys are derived from arbitrary
+   values MUST be specified by the cryptographic transform.  For
+   integrity protection functions based on Hashed Message Authentication
+   Code (HMAC), the fixed key size is the size of the output of the
+   underlying hash function.
+
+   It is assumed that pseudo-random functions (PRFs) accept keys of any
+   length, but have a preferred key size.  The preferred key size is
+   used as the length of SK_d, SK_pi, and SK_pr (see Section 2.14).  For
+   PRFs based on the HMAC construction, the preferred key size is equal
+   to the length of the output of the underlying hash function.  Other
+   types of PRFs MUST specify their preferred key size.
+
+   Keying material will always be derived as the output of the
+   negotiated prf algorithm.  Since the amount of keying material needed
+   may be greater than the size of the output of the prf algorithm, we
+   will use the prf iteratively.  We will use the terminology prf+ to
+   describe the function that outputs a pseudo-random stream based on
+   the inputs to a prf as follows: (where | indicates concatenation)
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 42]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   prf+ (K,S) = T1 | T2 | T3 | T4 | ...
+
+   where:
+   T1 = prf (K, S | 0x01)
+   T2 = prf (K, T1 | S | 0x02)
+   T3 = prf (K, T2 | S | 0x03)
+   T4 = prf (K, T3 | S | 0x04)
+
+   continuing as needed to compute all required keys.  The keys are
+   taken from the output string without regard to boundaries (e.g., if
+   the required keys are a 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)
+   key and a 160-bit HMAC key, and the prf function generates 160 bits,
+   the AES key will come from T1 and the beginning of T2, while the HMAC
+   key will come from the rest of T2 and the beginning of T3).
+
+   The constant concatenated to the end of each string feeding the prf
+   is a single octet. prf+ in this document is not defined beyond 255
+   times the size of the prf output.
+
+2.14.  Generating Keying Material for the IKE SA
+
+   The shared keys are computed as follows.  A quantity called SKEYSEED
+   is calculated from the nonces exchanged during the IKE_SA_INIT
+   exchange and the Diffie-Hellman shared secret established during that
+   exchange.  SKEYSEED is used to calculate seven other secrets: SK_d
+   used for deriving new keys for the Child SAs established with this
+   IKE SA; SK_ai and SK_ar used as a key to the integrity protection
+   algorithm for authenticating the component messages of subsequent
+   exchanges; SK_ei and SK_er used for encrypting (and of course
+   decrypting) all subsequent exchanges; and SK_pi and SK_pr, which are
+   used when generating an AUTH payload.  The lengths of SK_d, SK_pi,
+   and SK_pr are the preferred key length of the agreed-to PRF.
+
+   SKEYSEED and its derivatives are computed as follows:
+
+   SKEYSEED = prf(Ni | Nr, g^ir)
+
+   {SK_d | SK_ai | SK_ar | SK_ei | SK_er | SK_pi | SK_pr }
+                   = prf+ (SKEYSEED, Ni | Nr | SPIi | SPIr )
+
+   (indicating that the quantities SK_d, SK_ai, SK_ar, SK_ei, SK_er,
+   SK_pi, and SK_pr are taken in order from the generated bits of the
+   prf+). g^ir is the shared secret from the ephemeral Diffie-Hellman
+   exchange. g^ir is represented as a string of octets in big endian
+   order padded with zeros if necessary to make it the length of the
+   modulus.  Ni and Nr are the nonces, stripped of any headers.  For
+   historical backwards-compatibility reasons, there are two PRFs that
+   are treated specially in this calculation.  If the negotiated PRF is
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 43]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   AES-XCBC-PRF-128 [RFC4434] or AES-CMAC-PRF-128 [RFC4615], only the
+   first 64 bits of Ni and the first 64 bits of Nr are used in the
+   calculation.
+
+   The two directions of traffic flow use different keys.  The keys used
+   to protect messages from the original initiator are SK_ai and SK_ei.
+   The keys used to protect messages in the other direction are SK_ar
+   and SK_er.
+
+2.15.  Authentication of the IKE SA
+
+   When not using extensible authentication (see Section 2.16), the
+   peers are authenticated by having each sign (or MAC using a shared
+   secret as the key) a block of data.  For the responder, the octets to
+   be signed start with the first octet of the first SPI in the header
+   of the second message (IKE_SA_INIT response) and end with the last
+   octet of the last payload in the second message.  Appended to this
+   (for purposes of computing the signature) are the initiator's nonce
+   Ni (just the value, not the payload containing it), and the value
+   prf(SK_pr,IDr') where IDr' is the responder's ID payload excluding
+   the fixed header.  Note that neither the nonce Ni nor the value
+   prf(SK_pr,IDr') are transmitted.  Similarly, the initiator signs the
+   first message (IKE_SA_INIT request), starting with the first octet of
+   the first SPI in the header and ending with the last octet of the
+   last payload.  Appended to this (for purposes of computing the
+   signature) are the responder's nonce Nr, and the value
+   prf(SK_pi,IDi').  In the above calculation, IDi' and IDr' are the
+   entire ID payloads excluding the fixed header.  It is critical to the
+   security of the exchange that each side sign the other side's nonce.
+
+   {{ Clarif-3.1 }}
+
+   The initiator's signed octets can be described as:
+
+   InitiatorSignedOctets = RealMessage1 | NonceRData | MACedIDForI
+   GenIKEHDR = [ four octets 0 if using port 4500 ] | RealIKEHDR
+   RealIKEHDR =  SPIi | SPIr |  . . . | Length
+   RealMessage1 = RealIKEHDR | RestOfMessage1
+   NonceRPayload = PayloadHeader | NonceRData
+   InitiatorIDPayload = PayloadHeader | RestOfIDPayload
+   RestOfInitIDPayload = IDType | RESERVED | InitIDData
+   MACedIDForI = prf(SK_pi, RestOfInitIDPayload)
+
+   The responder's signed octets can be described as:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 44]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   ResponderSignedOctets = RealMessage2 | NonceIData | MACedIDForR
+   GenIKEHDR = [ four octets 0 if using port 4500 ] | RealIKEHDR
+   RealIKEHDR =  SPIi | SPIr |  . . . | Length
+   RealMessage2 = RealIKEHDR | RestOfMessage2
+   NonceIPayload = PayloadHeader | NonceIData
+   ResponderIDPayload = PayloadHeader | RestOfIDPayload
+   RestOfRespIDPayload = IDType | RESERVED | RespIDData
+   MACedIDForR = prf(SK_pr, RestOfRespIDPayload)
+
+   Note that all of the payloads are included under the signature,
+   including any payload types not defined in this document.  If the
+   first message of the exchange is sent multiple times (such as with a
+   responder cookie and/or a different Diffie-Hellman group), it is the
+   latest version of the message that is signed.
+
+   Optionally, messages 3 and 4 MAY include a certificate, or
+   certificate chain providing evidence that the key used to compute a
+   digital signature belongs to the name in the ID payload.  The
+   signature or MAC will be computed using algorithms dictated by the
+   type of key used by the signer, and specified by the Auth Method
+   field in the Authentication payload.  There is no requirement that
+   the initiator and responder sign with the same cryptographic
+   algorithms.  The choice of cryptographic algorithms depends on the
+   type of key each has.  In particular, the initiator may be using a
+   shared key while the responder may have a public signature key and
+   certificate.  It will commonly be the case (but it is not required)
+   that if a shared secret is used for authentication that the same key
+   is used in both directions.
+
+   Note that it is a common but typically insecure practice to have a
+   shared key derived solely from a user-chosen password without
+   incorporating another source of randomness.  This is typically
+   insecure because user-chosen passwords are unlikely to have
+   sufficient unpredictability to resist dictionary attacks and these
+   attacks are not prevented in this authentication method.
+   (Applications using password-based authentication for bootstrapping
+   and IKE SA should use the authentication method in Section 2.16,
+   which is designed to prevent off-line dictionary attacks.) {{ Demoted
+   the SHOULD }} The pre-shared key needs to contain as much
+   unpredictability as the strongest key being negotiated.  In the case
+   of a pre-shared key, the AUTH value is computed as:
+
+   AUTH = prf(prf(Shared Secret,"Key Pad for IKEv2"), <msg octets>)
+
+   where the string "Key Pad for IKEv2" is 17 ASCII characters without
+   null termination.  The shared secret can be variable length.  The pad
+   string is added so that if the shared secret is derived from a
+   password, the IKE implementation need not store the password in
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 45]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   cleartext, but rather can store the value prf(Shared Secret,"Key Pad
+   for IKEv2"), which could not be used as a password equivalent for
+   protocols other than IKEv2.  As noted above, deriving the shared
+   secret from a password is not secure.  This construction is used
+   because it is anticipated that people will do it anyway.  The
+   management interface by which the Shared Secret is provided MUST
+   accept ASCII strings of at least 64 octets and MUST NOT add a null
+   terminator before using them as shared secrets.  It MUST also accept
+   a hex encoding of the Shared Secret.  The management interface MAY
+   accept other encodings if the algorithm for translating the encoding
+   to a binary string is specified.
+
+2.16.  Extensible Authentication Protocol Methods
+
+   In addition to authentication using public key signatures and shared
+   secrets, IKE supports authentication using methods defined in RFC
+   3748 [EAP].  Typically, these methods are asymmetric (designed for a
+   user authenticating to a server), and they may not be mutual.  For
+   this reason, these protocols are typically used to authenticate the
+   initiator to the responder and MUST be used in conjunction with a
+   public key signature based authentication of the responder to the
+   initiator.  These methods are often associated with mechanisms
+   referred to as "Legacy Authentication" mechanisms.
+
+   While this memo references [EAP] with the intent that new methods can
+   be added in the future without updating this specification, some
+   simpler variations are documented here and in Section 3.16.  [EAP]
+   defines an authentication protocol requiring a variable number of
+   messages.  Extensible Authentication is implemented in IKE as
+   additional IKE_AUTH exchanges that MUST be completed in order to
+   initialize the IKE SA.
+
+   An initiator indicates a desire to use extensible authentication by
+   leaving out the AUTH payload from message 3.  By including an IDi
+   payload but not an AUTH payload, the initiator has declared an
+   identity but has not proven it.  If the responder is willing to use
+   an extensible authentication method, it will place an Extensible
+   Authentication Protocol (EAP) payload in message 4 and defer sending
+   SAr2, TSi, and TSr until initiator authentication is complete in a
+   subsequent IKE_AUTH exchange.  In the case of a minimal extensible
+   authentication, the initial SA establishment will appear as follows:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 46]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR, SAi1, KEi, Ni  -->
+                                <--  HDR, SAr1, KEr, Nr, [CERTREQ]
+   HDR, SK {IDi, [CERTREQ,]
+       [IDr,] SAi2,
+       TSi, TSr}  -->
+                                <--  HDR, SK {IDr, [CERT,] AUTH,
+                                         EAP }
+   HDR, SK {EAP}  -->
+                                <--  HDR, SK {EAP (success)}
+   HDR, SK {AUTH}  -->
+                                <--  HDR, SK {AUTH, SAr2, TSi, TSr }
+
+   {{ Clarif-3.10 }} As described in Section 2.2, when EAP is used, each
+   pair of IKE SA initial setup messages will have their message numbers
+   incremented; the first pair of AUTH messages will have an ID of 1,
+   the second will be 2, and so on.
+
+   For EAP methods that create a shared key as a side effect of
+   authentication, that shared key MUST be used by both the initiator
+   and responder to generate AUTH payloads in messages 7 and 8 using the
+   syntax for shared secrets specified in Section 2.15.  The shared key
+   from EAP is the field from the EAP specification named MSK.  This
+   shared key generated during an IKE exchange MUST NOT be used for any
+   other purpose.
+
+   EAP methods that do not establish a shared key SHOULD NOT be used, as
+   they are subject to a number of man-in-the-middle attacks [EAPMITM]
+   if these EAP methods are used in other protocols that do not use a
+   server-authenticated tunnel.  Please see the Security Considerations
+   section for more details.  If EAP methods that do not generate a
+   shared key are used, the AUTH payloads in messages 7 and 8 MUST be
+   generated using SK_pi and SK_pr, respectively.
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} The initiator of an IKE SA using EAP needs
+   to be capable of extending the initial protocol exchange to at least
+   ten IKE_AUTH exchanges in the event the responder sends notification
+   messages and/or retries the authentication prompt.  Once the protocol
+   exchange defined by the chosen EAP authentication method has
+   successfully terminated, the responder MUST send an EAP payload
+   containing the Success message.  Similarly, if the authentication
+   method has failed, the responder MUST send an EAP payload containing
+   the Failure message.  The responder MAY at any time terminate the IKE
+   exchange by sending an EAP payload containing the Failure message.
+
+   Following such an extended exchange, the EAP AUTH payloads MUST be
+   included in the two messages following the one containing the EAP
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 47]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Success message.
+
+   {{ Clarif-3.5 }} When the initiator authentication uses EAP, it is
+   possible that the contents of the IDi payload is used only for AAA
+   routing purposes and selecting which EAP method to use.  This value
+   may be different from the identity authenticated by the EAP method.
+   It is important that policy lookups and access control decisions use
+   the actual authenticated identity.  Often the EAP server is
+   implemented in a separate AAA server that communicates with the IKEv2
+   responder.  In this case, the authenticated identity has to be sent
+   from the AAA server to the IKEv2 responder.
+
+2.17.  Generating Keying Material for Child SAs
+
+   A single Child SA is created by the IKE_AUTH exchange, and additional
+   Child SAs can optionally be created in CREATE_CHILD_SA exchanges.
+   Keying material for them is generated as follows:
+
+   KEYMAT = prf+(SK_d, Ni | Nr)
+
+   Where Ni and Nr are the nonces from the IKE_SA_INIT exchange if this
+   request is the first Child SA created or the fresh Ni and Nr from the
+   CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange if this is a subsequent creation.
+
+   For CREATE_CHILD_SA exchanges including an optional Diffie-Hellman
+   exchange, the keying material is defined as:
+
+   KEYMAT = prf+(SK_d, g^ir (new) | Ni | Nr )
+
+   where g^ir (new) is the shared secret from the ephemeral Diffie-
+   Hellman exchange of this CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange (represented as an
+   octet string in big endian order padded with zeros in the high-order
+   bits if necessary to make it the length of the modulus).
+
+   For ESP and AH, a single Child SA negotiation results in two security
+   associations (one in each direction).  Keying material MUST be taken
+   from the expanded KEYMAT in the following order:
+
+   o  The encryption key (if any) for the SA carrying data from the
+      initiator to the responder.
+
+   o  The authentication key (if any) for the SA carrying data from the
+      initiator to the responder.
+
+   o  The encryption key (if any) for the SA carrying data from the
+      responder to the initiator.
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 48]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  The authentication key (if any) for the SA carrying data from the
+      responder to the initiator.
+
+   Each cryptographic algorithm takes a fixed number of bits of keying
+   material specified as part of the algorithm, or negotiated in SA
+   payloads (see Section 2.13 for description of key lengths, and
+   Section 3.3.5 for the definition of the Key Length transform
+   attribute).
+
+2.18.  Rekeying IKE SAs Using a CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange
+
+   The CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange can be used to rekey an existing IKE SA
+   (see Section 2.8). {{ Clarif-5.3 }} New initiator and responder SPIs
+   are supplied in the SPI fields in the Proposal structures inside the
+   Security Association (SA) payloads (not the SPI fields in the IKE
+   header).  The TS payloads are omitted when rekeying an IKE SA.
+   SKEYSEED for the new IKE SA is computed using SK_d from the existing
+   IKE SA as follows:
+
+   SKEYSEED = prf(SK_d (old), [g^ir (new)] | Ni | Nr)
+
+   where g^ir (new) is the shared secret from the ephemeral Diffie-
+   Hellman exchange of this CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange (represented as an
+   octet string in big endian order padded with zeros if necessary to
+   make it the length of the modulus) and Ni and Nr are the two nonces
+   stripped of any headers.
+
+   {{ Clarif-5.5 }} The old and new IKE SA may have selected a different
+   PRF.  Because the rekeying exchange belongs to the old IKE SA, it is
+   the old IKE SA's PRF that is used.
+
+   {{ Clarif-5.12}} The main rekeying the IKE SA is to ensure that the
+   compromise of old keying material does not provide information about
+   the current keys, or vice versa.  Therefore, implementations SHOULD
+   perform a new Diffie-Hellman exchange when rekeying the IKE SA.  In
+   other words, an initiator SHOULD NOT propose the value "NONE" for the
+   D-H transform, and a responder SHOULD NOT accept such a proposal.
+   This means that a succesful exchange rekeying the IKE SA always
+   includes the KEi/KEr payloads.
+
+   The new IKE SA MUST reset its message counters to 0.
+
+   SK_d, SK_ai, SK_ar, SK_ei, and SK_er are computed from SKEYSEED as
+   specified in Section 2.14.
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 49]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+2.19.  Requesting an Internal Address on a Remote Network
+
+   Most commonly occurring in the endpoint-to-security-gateway scenario,
+   an endpoint may need an IP address in the network protected by the
+   security gateway and may need to have that address dynamically
+   assigned.  A request for such a temporary address can be included in
+   any request to create a Child SA (including the implicit request in
+   message 3) by including a CP payload.
+
+   This function provides address allocation to an IPsec Remote Access
+   Client (IRAC) trying to tunnel into a network protected by an IPsec
+   Remote Access Server (IRAS).  Since the IKE_AUTH exchange creates an
+   IKE SA and a Child SA, the IRAC MUST request the IRAS-controlled
+   address (and optionally other information concerning the protected
+   network) in the IKE_AUTH exchange.  The IRAS may procure an address
+   for the IRAC from any number of sources such as a DHCP/BOOTP server
+   or its own address pool.
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+    HDR, SK {IDi, [CERT,]
+       [CERTREQ,] [IDr,] AUTH,
+       CP(CFG_REQUEST), SAi2,
+       TSi, TSr}  -->
+                                <--  HDR, SK {IDr, [CERT,] AUTH,
+                                         CP(CFG_REPLY), SAr2,
+                                         TSi, TSr}
+
+   In all cases, the CP payload MUST be inserted before the SA payload.
+   In variations of the protocol where there are multiple IKE_AUTH
+   exchanges, the CP payloads MUST be inserted in the messages
+   containing the SA payloads.
+
+   CP(CFG_REQUEST) MUST contain at least an INTERNAL_ADDRESS attribute
+   (either IPv4 or IPv6) but MAY contain any number of additional
+   attributes the initiator wants returned in the response.
+
+   For example, message from initiator to responder:
+
+   CP(CFG_REQUEST)=
+     INTERNAL_ADDRESS()
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535,0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535,0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255)
+
+   NOTE: Traffic Selectors contain (protocol, port range, address
+   range).
+
+   Message from responder to initiator:
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 50]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   CP(CFG_REPLY)=
+     INTERNAL_ADDRESS(192.0.2.202)
+     INTERNAL_NETMASK(255.255.255.0)
+     INTERNAL_SUBNET(192.0.2.0/255.255.255.0)
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535,192.0.2.202-192.0.2.202)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535,192.0.2.0-192.0.2.255)
+
+   All returned values will be implementation dependent.  As can be seen
+   in the above example, the IRAS MAY also send other attributes that
+   were not included in CP(CFG_REQUEST) and MAY ignore the non-
+   mandatory attributes that it does not support.
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-37 }} The FAILED_CP_REQUIRED notification is sent by
+   responder in the case where CP(CFG_REQUEST) was expected but not
+   received, and so is a conflict with locally configured policy.  There
+   is no associated data.
+
+   The responder MUST NOT send a CFG_REPLY without having first received
+   a CP(CFG_REQUEST) from the initiator, because we do not want the IRAS
+   to perform an unnecessary configuration lookup if the IRAC cannot
+   process the REPLY.  In the case where the IRAS's configuration
+   requires that CP be used for a given identity IDi, but IRAC has
+   failed to send a CP(CFG_REQUEST), IRAS MUST fail the request, and
+   terminate the IKE exchange with a FAILED_CP_REQUIRED error.  The
+   FAILED_CP_REQUIRED is not fatal to the IKE SA; it simply causes the
+   Child SA creation fail.  The initiator can fix this by later starting
+   a new configuration payload request.
+
+2.19.1.  Configuration Payloads
+
+   Editor's note: some of this sub-section is redundant and will go away
+   in the next version of the document.
+
+   In support of the scenario described in Section 1.1.3, an initiator
+   may request that the responder assign an IP address and tell the
+   initiator what it is. {{ Clarif-6.1 }} That request is done using
+   configuration payloads, not traffic selectors.  An address in a TSi
+   payload in a response does not mean that the responder has assigned
+   that address to the initiator: it only means that if packets matching
+   these traffic selectors are sent by the initiator, IPsec processing
+   can be performed as agreed for this SA.
+
+   Configuration payloads are of type CFG_REQUEST/CFG_REPLY or CFG_SET/
+   CFG_ACK (see CFG Type in the payload description below).  CFG_REQUEST
+   and CFG_SET payloads may optionally be added to any IKE request.  The
+   IKE response MUST include either a corresponding CFG_REPLY or CFG_ACK
+   or a Notify payload with an error type indicating why the request
+   could not be honored.  An exception is that a minimal implementation
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 51]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   MAY ignore all CFG_REQUEST and CFG_SET payloads, so a response
+   message without a corresponding CFG_REPLY or CFG_ACK MUST be accepted
+   as an indication that the request was not supported.
+
+   "CFG_REQUEST/CFG_REPLY" allows an IKE endpoint to request information
+   from its peer.  If an attribute in the CFG_REQUEST Configuration
+   Payload is not zero-length, it is taken as a suggestion for that
+   attribute.  The CFG_REPLY Configuration Payload MAY return that
+   value, or a new one.  It MAY also add new attributes and not include
+   some requested ones.  Requestors MUST ignore returned attributes that
+   they do not recognize.
+
+   Some attributes MAY be multi-valued, in which case multiple attribute
+   values of the same type are sent and/or returned.  Generally, all
+   values of an attribute are returned when the attribute is requested.
+   For some attributes (in this version of the specification only
+   internal addresses), multiple requests indicates a request that
+   multiple values be assigned.  For these attributes, the number of
+   values returned SHOULD NOT exceed the number requested.
+
+   If the data type requested in a CFG_REQUEST is not recognized or not
+   supported, the responder MUST NOT return an error type but rather
+   MUST either send a CFG_REPLY that MAY be empty or a reply not
+   containing a CFG_REPLY payload at all.  Error returns are reserved
+   for cases where the request is recognized but cannot be performed as
+   requested or the request is badly formatted.
+
+   "CFG_SET/CFG_ACK" allows an IKE endpoint to push configuration data
+   to its peer.  In this case, the CFG_SET Configuration Payload
+   contains attributes the initiator wants its peer to alter.  The
+   responder MUST return a Configuration Payload if it accepted any of
+   the configuration data and it MUST contain the attributes that the
+   responder accepted with zero-length data.  Those attributes that it
+   did not accept MUST NOT be in the CFG_ACK Configuration Payload.  If
+   no attributes were accepted, the responder MUST return either an
+   empty CFG_ACK payload or a response message without a CFG_ACK
+   payload.  There are currently no defined uses for the CFG_SET/CFG_ACK
+   exchange, though they may be used in connection with extensions based
+   on Vendor IDs.  An minimal implementation of this specification MAY
+   ignore CFG_SET payloads.
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} Extensions via the CP payload should not be
+   used for general purpose management.  Its main intent is to provide a
+   bootstrap mechanism to exchange information within IPsec from IRAS to
+   IRAC.  While it MAY be useful to use such a method to exchange
+   information between some Security Gateways (SGW) or small networks,
+   existing management protocols such as DHCP [DHCP], RADIUS [RADIUS],
+   SNMP, or LDAP [LDAP] should be preferred for enterprise management as
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 52]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   well as subsequent information exchanges.
+
+2.20.  Requesting the Peer's Version
+
+   An IKE peer wishing to inquire about the other peer's IKE software
+   version information MAY use the method below.  This is an example of
+   a configuration request within an INFORMATIONAL exchange, after the
+   IKE SA and first Child SA have been created.
+
+   An IKE implementation MAY decline to give out version information
+   prior to authentication or even after authentication to prevent
+   trolling in case some implementation is known to have some security
+   weakness.  In that case, it MUST either return an empty string or no
+   CP payload if CP is not supported.
+
+   Initiator                         Responder
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   HDR, SK{CP(CFG_REQUEST)}  -->
+                                <--  HDR, SK{CP(CFG_REPLY)}
+
+   CP(CFG_REQUEST)=
+     APPLICATION_VERSION("")
+
+   CP(CFG_REPLY) APPLICATION_VERSION("foobar v1.3beta, (c) Foo Bar
+     Inc.")
+
+2.21.  Error Handling
+
+   There are many kinds of errors that can occur during IKE processing.
+   If a request is received that is badly formatted or unacceptable for
+   reasons of policy (e.g., no matching cryptographic algorithms), the
+   response MUST contain a Notify payload indicating the error.  If an
+   error occurs outside the context of an IKE request (e.g., the node is
+   getting ESP messages on a nonexistent SPI), the node SHOULD initiate
+   an INFORMATIONAL exchange with a Notify payload describing the
+   problem.
+
+   Errors that occur before a cryptographically protected IKE SA is
+   established must be handled very carefully.  There is a trade-off
+   between wanting to be helpful in diagnosing a problem and responding
+   to it and wanting to avoid being a dupe in a denial of service attack
+   based on forged messages.
+
+   If a node receives a message on UDP port 500 or 4500 outside the
+   context of an IKE SA known to it (and not a request to start one), it
+   may be the result of a recent crash of the node.  If the message is
+   marked as a response, the node MAY audit the suspicious event but
+   MUST NOT respond.  If the message is marked as a request, the node
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 53]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   MAY audit the suspicious event and MAY send a response.  If a
+   response is sent, the response MUST be sent to the IP address and
+   port from whence it came with the same IKE SPIs and the Message ID
+   copied.  The response MUST NOT be cryptographically protected and
+   MUST contain a Notify payload indicating INVALID_IKE_SPI. {{ 3.10.1-4
+   }} The INVALID_IKE_SPI notification indicates an IKE message was
+   received with an unrecognized destination SPI; this usually indicates
+   that the recipient has rebooted and forgotten the existence of an IKE
+   SA.
+
+   A node receiving such an unprotected Notify payload MUST NOT respond
+   and MUST NOT change the state of any existing SAs.  The message might
+   be a forgery or might be a response the genuine correspondent was
+   tricked into sending. {{ Demoted two SHOULDs }} A node should treat
+   such a message (and also a network message like ICMP destination
+   unreachable) as a hint that there might be problems with SAs to that
+   IP address and should initiate a liveness test for any such IKE SA.
+   An implementation SHOULD limit the frequency of such tests to avoid
+   being tricked into participating in a denial of service attack.
+
+   A node receiving a suspicious message from an IP address with which
+   it has an IKE SA MAY send an IKE Notify payload in an IKE
+   INFORMATIONAL exchange over that SA. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} The
+   recipient MUST NOT change the state of any SAs as a result, but may
+   wish to audit the event to aid in diagnosing malfunctions.  A node
+   MUST limit the rate at which it will send messages in response to
+   unprotected messages.
+
+2.22.  IPComp
+
+   Use of IP compression [IP-COMP] can be negotiated as part of the
+   setup of a Child SA.  While IP compression involves an extra header
+   in each packet and a compression parameter index (CPI), the virtual
+   "compression association" has no life outside the ESP or AH SA that
+   contains it.  Compression associations disappear when the
+   corresponding ESP or AH SA goes away.  It is not explicitly mentioned
+   in any DELETE payload.
+
+   Negotiation of IP compression is separate from the negotiation of
+   cryptographic parameters associated with a Child SA.  A node
+   requesting a Child SA MAY advertise its support for one or more
+   compression algorithms through one or more Notify payloads of type
+   IPCOMP_SUPPORTED.  This notification may be included only in a
+   message containing an SA payload negotiating a Child SA and indicates
+   a willingness by its sender to use IPComp on this SA.  The response
+   MAY indicate acceptance of a single compression algorithm with a
+   Notify payload of type IPCOMP_SUPPORTED.  These payloads MUST NOT
+   occur in messages that do not contain SA payloads.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 54]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16387 }}The data associated with this notification includes
+   a two-octet IPComp CPI followed by a one-octet transform ID
+   optionally followed by attributes whose length and format are defined
+   by that transform ID.  A message proposing an SA may contain multiple
+   IPCOMP_SUPPORTED notifications to indicate multiple supported
+   algorithms.  A message accepting an SA may contain at most one.
+
+   The transform IDs currently defined are:
+
+   Name              Number   Defined In
+   -------------------------------------
+   RESERVED          0
+   IPCOMP_OUI        1
+   IPCOMP_DEFLATE    2        RFC 2394
+   IPCOMP_LZS        3        RFC 2395
+   IPCOMP_LZJH       4        RFC 3051
+   RESERVED TO IANA  5-240
+   PRIVATE USE       241-255
+
+   Although there has been discussion of allowing multiple compression
+   algorithms to be accepted and to have different compression
+   algorithms available for the two directions of a Child SA,
+   implementations of this specification MUST NOT accept an IPComp
+   algorithm that was not proposed, MUST NOT accept more than one, and
+   MUST NOT compress using an algorithm other than one proposed and
+   accepted in the setup of the Child SA.
+
+   A side effect of separating the negotiation of IPComp from
+   cryptographic parameters is that it is not possible to propose
+   multiple cryptographic suites and propose IP compression with some of
+   them but not others.
+
+   In some cases, Robust Header Compression (ROHC) may be more
+   appropriate than IP Compression.  [ROHCV2] defines the use of ROHC
+   with IKEv2 and IPsec.
+
+2.23.  NAT Traversal
+
+   Network Address Translation (NAT) gateways are a controversial
+   subject.  This section briefly describes what they are and how they
+   are likely to act on IKE traffic.  Many people believe that NATs are
+   evil and that we should not design our protocols so as to make them
+   work better.  IKEv2 does specify some unintuitive processing rules in
+   order that NATs are more likely to work.
+
+   NATs exist primarily because of the shortage of IPv4 addresses,
+   though there are other rationales.  IP nodes that are "behind" a NAT
+   have IP addresses that are not globally unique, but rather are
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 55]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   assigned from some space that is unique within the network behind the
+   NAT but that are likely to be reused by nodes behind other NATs.
+   Generally, nodes behind NATs can communicate with other nodes behind
+   the same NAT and with nodes with globally unique addresses, but not
+   with nodes behind other NATs.  There are exceptions to that rule.
+   When those nodes make connections to nodes on the real Internet, the
+   NAT gateway "translates" the IP source address to an address that
+   will be routed back to the gateway.  Messages to the gateway from the
+   Internet have their destination addresses "translated" to the
+   internal address that will route the packet to the correct endnode.
+
+   NATs are designed to be "transparent" to endnodes.  Neither software
+   on the node behind the NAT nor the node on the Internet requires
+   modification to communicate through the NAT.  Achieving this
+   transparency is more difficult with some protocols than with others.
+   Protocols that include IP addresses of the endpoints within the
+   payloads of the packet will fail unless the NAT gateway understands
+   the protocol and modifies the internal references as well as those in
+   the headers.  Such knowledge is inherently unreliable, is a network
+   layer violation, and often results in subtle problems.
+
+   Opening an IPsec connection through a NAT introduces special
+   problems.  If the connection runs in transport mode, changing the IP
+   addresses on packets will cause the checksums to fail and the NAT
+   cannot correct the checksums because they are cryptographically
+   protected.  Even in tunnel mode, there are routing problems because
+   transparently translating the addresses of AH and ESP packets
+   requires special logic in the NAT and that logic is heuristic and
+   unreliable in nature.  For that reason, IKEv2 will use UDP
+   encapsulation of IKE and ESP packets.  This encoding is slightly less
+   efficient but is easier for NATs to process.  In addition, firewalls
+   may be configured to pass IPsec traffic over UDP but not ESP/AH or
+   vice versa.
+
+   It is a common practice of NATs to translate TCP and UDP port numbers
+   as well as addresses and use the port numbers of inbound packets to
+   decide which internal node should get a given packet.  For this
+   reason, even though IKE packets MUST be sent from and to UDP port 500
+   or 4500, they MUST be accepted coming from any port and responses
+   MUST be sent to the port from whence they came.  This is because the
+   ports may be modified as the packets pass through NATs.  Similarly,
+   IP addresses of the IKE endpoints are generally not included in the
+   IKE payloads because the payloads are cryptographically protected and
+   could not be transparently modified by NATs.
+
+   Port 4500 is reserved for UDP-encapsulated ESP and IKE. {{ Clarif-7.6
+   }} An IPsec endpoint that discovers a NAT between it and its
+   correspondent MUST send all subsequent traffic from port 4500, which
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 56]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   NATs should not treat specially (as they might with port 500).
+
+   The specific requirements for supporting NAT traversal [NATREQ] are
+   listed below.  Support for NAT traversal is optional.  In this
+   section only, requirements listed as MUST apply only to
+   implementations supporting NAT traversal.
+
+   o  IKE MUST listen on port 4500 as well as port 500.  IKE MUST
+      respond to the IP address and port from which packets arrived.
+
+   o  Both IKE initiator and responder MUST include in their IKE_SA_INIT
+      packets Notify payloads of type NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP and
+      NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP.  Those payloads can be used to
+      detect if there is NAT between the hosts, and which end is behind
+      the NAT.  The location of the payloads in the IKE_SA_INIT packets
+      is just after the Ni and Nr payloads (before the optional CERTREQ
+      payload).
+
+   o  {{ 3.10.1-16388 }} The data associated with the
+      NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP notification is a SHA-1 digest of the SPIs
+      (in the order they appear in the header), IP address, and port on
+      which this packet was sent.  There MAY be multiple
+      NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP payloads in a message if the sender does
+      not know which of several network attachments will be used to send
+      the packet.
+
+   o  {{ 3.10.1-16389 }} The data associated with the
+      NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP notification is a SHA-1 digest of the
+      SPIs (in the order they appear in the header), IP address, and
+      port to which this packet was sent.
+
+   o  {{ 3.10.1-16388 }} {{ 3.10.1-16389 }} The recipient of either the
+      NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP or NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP
+      notification MAY compare the supplied value to a SHA-1 hash of the
+      SPIs, source IP address, and port, and if they don't match it
+      SHOULD enable NAT traversal.  In the case of a mismatching
+      NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP hash, the recipient MAY reject the
+      connection attempt if NAT traversal is not supported.  In the case
+      of a mismatching NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP hash, it means that
+      the system receiving the NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP payload is
+      behind a NAT and that system SHOULD start sending keepalive
+      packets as defined in [UDPENCAPS]; alternately, it MAY reject the
+      connection attempt if NAT traversal is not supported.
+
+   o  If none of the NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP payload(s) received matches
+      the expected value of the source IP and port found from the IP
+      header of the packet containing the payload, it means that the
+      system sending those payloads is behind NAT (i.e., someone along
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 57]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      the route changed the source address of the original packet to
+      match the address of the NAT box).  In this case, the system
+      receiving the payloads should allow dynamic update of the other
+      systems' IP address, as described later.
+
+   o  If the NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP payload received does not
+      match the hash of the destination IP and port found from the IP
+      header of the packet containing the payload, it means that the
+      system receiving the NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP payload is
+      behind a NAT.  In this case, that system SHOULD start sending
+      keepalive packets as explained in [UDPENCAPS].
+
+   o  The IKE initiator MUST check these payloads if present and if they
+      do not match the addresses in the outer packet MUST tunnel all
+      future IKE and ESP packets associated with this IKE SA over UDP
+      port 4500.
+
+   o  To tunnel IKE packets over UDP port 4500, the IKE header has four
+      octets of zero prepended and the result immediately follows the
+      UDP header.  To tunnel ESP packets over UDP port 4500, the ESP
+      header immediately follows the UDP header.  Since the first four
+      octets of the ESP header contain the SPI, and the SPI cannot
+      validly be zero, it is always possible to distinguish ESP and IKE
+      messages.
+
+   o  Implementations MUST process received UDP-encapsulated ESP packets
+      even when no NAT was detected.
+
+   o  The original source and destination IP address required for the
+      transport mode TCP and UDP packet checksum fixup (see [UDPENCAPS])
+      are obtained from the Traffic Selectors associated with the
+      exchange.  In the case of NAT traversal, the Traffic Selectors
+      MUST contain exactly one IP address, which is then used as the
+      original IP address.
+
+   o  There are cases where a NAT box decides to remove mappings that
+      are still alive (for example, the keepalive interval is too long,
+      or the NAT box is rebooted).  To recover in these cases, hosts
+      that are not behind a NAT SHOULD send all packets (including
+      retransmission packets) to the IP address and port from the last
+      valid authenticated packet from the other end (i.e., dynamically
+      update the address).  A host behind a NAT SHOULD NOT do this
+      because it opens a DoS attack possibility.  Any authenticated IKE
+      packet or any authenticated UDP-encapsulated ESP packet can be
+      used to detect that the IP address or the port has changed.
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 58]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+2.24.  Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN)
+
+   When IPsec tunnels behave as originally specified in [IPSECARCH-OLD],
+   ECN usage is not appropriate for the outer IP headers because tunnel
+   decapsulation processing discards ECN congestion indications to the
+   detriment of the network.  ECN support for IPsec tunnels for IKEv1-
+   based IPsec requires multiple operating modes and negotiation (see
+   [ECN]).  IKEv2 simplifies this situation by requiring that ECN be
+   usable in the outer IP headers of all tunnel-mode IPsec SAs created
+   by IKEv2.  Specifically, tunnel encapsulators and decapsulators for
+   all tunnel-mode SAs created by IKEv2 MUST support the ECN full-
+   functionality option for tunnels specified in [ECN] and MUST
+   implement the tunnel encapsulation and decapsulation processing
+   specified in [IPSECARCH] to prevent discarding of ECN congestion
+   indications.
+
+
+3.  Header and Payload Formats
+
+   In the tables in this section, some cryptographic primitives and
+   configuation attributes are marked as "UNSPECIFIED".  These are items
+   for which there are no known specifications and therefore
+   interoperability is currently impossible.  A future specification may
+   describe their use, but until such specification is made,
+   implementations SHOULD NOT attempt to use items marked as
+   "UNSPECIFIED" in implementations that are meant to be interoperable.
+
+3.1.  The IKE Header
+
+   IKE messages use UDP ports 500 and/or 4500, with one IKE message per
+   UDP datagram.  Information from the beginning of the packet through
+   the UDP header is largely ignored except that the IP addresses and
+   UDP ports from the headers are reversed and used for return packets.
+   When sent on UDP port 500, IKE messages begin immediately following
+   the UDP header.  When sent on UDP port 4500, IKE messages have
+   prepended four octets of zero.  These four octets of zero are not
+   part of the IKE message and are not included in any of the length
+   fields or checksums defined by IKE.  Each IKE message begins with the
+   IKE header, denoted HDR in this memo.  Following the header are one
+   or more IKE payloads each identified by a "Next Payload" field in the
+   preceding payload.  Payloads are processed in the order in which they
+   appear in an IKE message by invoking the appropriate processing
+   routine according to the "Next Payload" field in the IKE header and
+   subsequently according to the "Next Payload" field in the IKE payload
+   itself until a "Next Payload" field of zero indicates that no
+   payloads follow.  If a payload of type "Encrypted" is found, that
+   payload is decrypted and its contents parsed as additional payloads.
+   An Encrypted payload MUST be the last payload in a packet and an
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 59]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Encrypted payload MUST NOT contain another Encrypted payload.
+
+   The Recipient SPI in the header identifies an instance of an IKE
+   security association.  It is therefore possible for a single instance
+   of IKE to multiplex distinct sessions with multiple peers.
+
+   All multi-octet fields representing integers are laid out in big
+   endian order (also known as "most significant byte first", or
+   "network byte order").
+
+   The format of the IKE header is shown in Figure 4.
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                       IKE SA Initiator's SPI                  |
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                       IKE SA Responder's SPI                  |
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |  Next Payload | MjVer | MnVer | Exchange Type |     Flags     |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                          Message ID                           |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                            Length                             |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+                    Figure 4:  IKE Header Format
+
+   o  Initiator's SPI (8 octets) - A value chosen by the initiator to
+      identify a unique IKE security association.  This value MUST NOT
+      be zero.
+
+   o  Responder's SPI (8 octets) - A value chosen by the responder to
+      identify a unique IKE security association.  This value MUST be
+      zero in the first message of an IKE Initial Exchange (including
+      repeats of that message including a cookie). {{ The phrase "and
+      MUST NOT be zero in any other message" was removed; Clarif-2.1 }}
+
+   o  Next Payload (1 octet) - Indicates the type of payload that
+      immediately follows the header.  The format and value of each
+      payload are defined below.
+
+   o  Major Version (4 bits) - Indicates the major version of the IKE
+      protocol in use.  Implementations based on this version of IKE
+      MUST set the Major Version to 2.  Implementations based on
+      previous versions of IKE and ISAKMP MUST set the Major Version to
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 60]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      1.  Implementations based on this version of IKE MUST reject or
+      ignore messages containing a version number greater than 2 with an
+      INVALID_MAJOR_VERSION notification message as described in Section
+      2.5.
+
+   o  Minor Version (4 bits) - Indicates the minor version of the IKE
+      protocol in use.  Implementations based on this version of IKE
+      MUST set the Minor Version to 0.  They MUST ignore the minor
+      version number of received messages.
+
+   o  Exchange Type (1 octet) - Indicates the type of exchange being
+      used.  This constrains the payloads sent in each message in an
+      exchange.
+
+      Exchange Type             Value
+      ----------------------------------
+      RESERVED                  0-33
+      IKE_SA_INIT               34
+      IKE_AUTH                  35
+      CREATE_CHILD_SA           36
+      INFORMATIONAL             37
+      RESERVED TO IANA          38-239
+      PRIVATE USE               240-255
+
+   o  Flags (1 octet) - Indicates specific options that are set for the
+      message.  Presence of options is indicated by the appropriate bit
+      in the flags field being set.  The bits are defined LSB first, so
+      bit 0 would be the least significant bit of the Flags octet.  In
+      the description below, a bit being 'set' means its value is '1',
+      while 'cleared' means its value is '0'.
+
+      *  X(reserved) (bits 0-2) - These bits MUST be cleared when
+         sending and MUST be ignored on receipt.
+
+      *  I(nitiator) (bit 3 of Flags) - This bit MUST be set in messages
+         sent by the original initiator of the IKE SA and MUST be
+         cleared in messages sent by the original responder.  It is used
+         by the recipient to determine which eight octets of the SPI
+         were generated by the recipient.  This bit changes to reflect
+         who initiated the last rekey of the IKE SA.
+
+      *  V(ersion) (bit 4 of Flags) - This bit indicates that the
+         transmitter is capable of speaking a higher major version
+         number of the protocol than the one indicated in the major
+         version number field.  Implementations of IKEv2 must clear this
+         bit when sending and MUST ignore it in incoming messages.
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 61]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      *  R(esponse) (bit 5 of Flags) - This bit indicates that this
+         message is a response to a message containing the same message
+         ID.  This bit MUST be cleared in all request messages and MUST
+         be set in all responses.  An IKE endpoint MUST NOT generate a
+         response to a message that is marked as being a response.
+
+      *  X(reserved) (bits 6-7 of Flags) - These bits MUST be cleared
+         when sending and MUST be ignored on receipt.
+
+   o  Message ID (4 octets) - Message identifier used to control
+      retransmission of lost packets and matching of requests and
+      responses.  It is essential to the security of the protocol
+      because it is used to prevent message replay attacks.  See
+      Section 2.1 and Section 2.2.
+
+   o  Length (4 octets) - Length of total message (header + payloads) in
+      octets.
+
+3.2.  Generic Payload Header
+
+   Each IKE payload defined in Section 3.3 through Section 3.16 begins
+   with a generic payload header, shown in Figure 5.  Figures for each
+   payload below will include the generic payload header, but for
+   brevity the description of each field will be omitted.
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+                      Figure 5:  Generic Payload Header
+
+   The Generic Payload Header fields are defined as follows:
+
+   o  Next Payload (1 octet) - Identifier for the payload type of the
+      next payload in the message.  If the current payload is the last
+      in the message, then this field will be 0.  This field provides a
+      "chaining" capability whereby additional payloads can be added to
+      a message by appending it to the end of the message and setting
+      the "Next Payload" field of the preceding payload to indicate the
+      new payload's type.  An Encrypted payload, which must always be
+      the last payload of a message, is an exception.  It contains data
+      structures in the format of additional payloads.  In the header of
+      an Encrypted payload, the Next Payload field is set to the payload
+      type of the first contained payload (instead of 0).  The payload
+      type values are:
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 62]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      Next Payload Type                Notation  Value
+      --------------------------------------------------
+      No Next Payload                             0
+      RESERVED                                    1-32
+      Security Association             SA         33
+      Key Exchange                     KE         34
+      Identification - Initiator       IDi        35
+      Identification - Responder       IDr        36
+      Certificate                      CERT       37
+      Certificate Request              CERTREQ    38
+      Authentication                   AUTH       39
+      Nonce                            Ni, Nr     40
+      Notify                           N          41
+      Delete                           D          42
+      Vendor ID                        V          43
+      Traffic Selector - Initiator     TSi        44
+      Traffic Selector - Responder     TSr        45
+      Encrypted                        E          46
+      Configuration                    CP         47
+      Extensible Authentication        EAP        48
+      RESERVED TO IANA                            49-127
+      PRIVATE USE                                 128-255
+
+      (Payload type values 1-32 should not be assigned in the
+      future so that there is no overlap with the code assignments
+      for IKEv1.)
+
+   o  Critical (1 bit) - MUST be set to zero if the sender wants the
+      recipient to skip this payload if it does not understand the
+      payload type code in the Next Payload field of the previous
+      payload.  MUST be set to one if the sender wants the recipient to
+      reject this entire message if it does not understand the payload
+      type.  MUST be ignored by the recipient if the recipient
+      understands the payload type code.  MUST be set to zero for
+      payload types defined in this document.  Note that the critical
+      bit applies to the current payload rather than the "next" payload
+      whose type code appears in the first octet.  The reasoning behind
+      not setting the critical bit for payloads defined in this document
+      is that all implementations MUST understand all payload types
+      defined in this document and therefore must ignore the Critical
+      bit's value.  Skipped payloads are expected to have valid Next
+      Payload and Payload Length fields.
+
+   o  RESERVED (7 bits) - MUST be sent as zero; MUST be ignored on
+      receipt.
+
+   o  Payload Length (2 octets) - Length in octets of the current
+      payload, including the generic payload header.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 63]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   {{ Clarif-7.10 }} Many payloads contain fields marked as "RESERVED".
+   Some payloads in IKEv2 (and historically in IKEv1) are not aligned to
+   4-octet boundaries.
+
+3.3.  Security Association Payload
+
+   The Security Association Payload, denoted SA in this memo, is used to
+   negotiate attributes of a security association.  Assembly of Security
+   Association Payloads requires great peace of mind.  An SA payload MAY
+   contain multiple proposals.  If there is more than one, they MUST be
+   ordered from most preferred to least preferred.  Each proposal
+   contains a single IPsec protocol (where a protocol is IKE, ESP, or
+   AH), each protocol MAY contain multiple transforms, and each
+   transform MAY contain multiple attributes.  When parsing an SA, an
+   implementation MUST check that the total Payload Length is consistent
+   with the payload's internal lengths and counts.  Proposals,
+   Transforms, and Attributes each have their own variable length
+   encodings.  They are nested such that the Payload Length of an SA
+   includes the combined contents of the SA, Proposal, Transform, and
+   Attribute information.  The length of a Proposal includes the lengths
+   of all Transforms and Attributes it contains.  The length of a
+   Transform includes the lengths of all Attributes it contains.
+
+   The syntax of Security Associations, Proposals, Transforms, and
+   Attributes is based on ISAKMP; however the semantics are somewhat
+   different.  The reason for the complexity and the hierarchy is to
+   allow for multiple possible combinations of algorithms to be encoded
+   in a single SA.  Sometimes there is a choice of multiple algorithms,
+   whereas other times there is a combination of algorithms.  For
+   example, an initiator might want to propose using ESP with either
+   (3DES and HMAC_MD5) or (AES and HMAC_SHA1).
+
+   One of the reasons the semantics of the SA payload has changed from
+   ISAKMP and IKEv1 is to make the encodings more compact in common
+   cases.
+
+   The Proposal structure contains within it a Proposal # and an IPsec
+   protocol ID.  Each structure MUST have a proposal number one (1)
+   greater than the previous structure.  The first Proposal in the
+   initiator's SA payload MUST have a Proposal # of one (1).  One reason
+   to use multiple proposals is to propose both standard crypto ciphers
+   and combined-mode ciphers.  Combined-mode ciphers include both
+   integrity and encryption in a single encryption algorithm, and are
+   not allowed to be offered with a separate integrity algorithm other
+   than "none".  If an initiator wants to propose both combined-mode
+   ciphers and normal ciphers, it must include two proposals: one will
+   have all the combined-mode ciphers, and the other will have all the
+   normal ciphers with the integrity algorithms.  For example, one such
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 64]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   proposal would have two proposal structures: ESP with ENCR_AES-CCM_8,
+   ENCR_AES-CCM_12, and ENCR_AES-CCM_16 as Proposal #1, and ESP with
+   ENCR_AES_CBC, ENCR_3DES, AUTH_AES_XCBC_96, and AUTH_HMAC_SHA1_96 as
+   Proposal #2.
+
+   Each Proposal/Protocol structure is followed by one or more transform
+   structures.  The number of different transforms is generally
+   determined by the Protocol.  AH generally has two transforms:
+   Extended Sequence Numbers (ESN) and an integrity check algorithm.
+   ESP generally has three: ESN, an encryption algorithm and an
+   integrity check algorithm.  IKE generally has four transforms: a
+   Diffie-Hellman group, an integrity check algorithm, a prf algorithm,
+   and an encryption algorithm.  If an algorithm that combines
+   encryption and integrity protection is proposed, it MUST be proposed
+   as an encryption algorithm and an integrity protection algorithm MUST
+   NOT be proposed.  For each Protocol, the set of permissible
+   transforms is assigned transform ID numbers, which appear in the
+   header of each transform.
+
+   If there are multiple transforms with the same Transform Type, the
+   proposal is an OR of those transforms.  If there are multiple
+   Transforms with different Transform Types, the proposal is an AND of
+   the different groups.  For example, to propose ESP with (3DES or AES-
+   CBC) and (HMAC_MD5 or HMAC_SHA), the ESP proposal would contain two
+   Transform Type 1 candidates (one for 3DES and one for AEC-CBC) and
+   two Transform Type 3 candidates (one for HMAC_MD5 and one for
+   HMAC_SHA).  This effectively proposes four combinations of
+   algorithms.  If the initiator wanted to propose only a subset of
+   those, for example (3DES and HMAC_MD5) or (IDEA and HMAC_SHA), there
+   is no way to encode that as multiple transforms within a single
+   Proposal.  Instead, the initiator would have to construct two
+   different Proposals, each with two transforms.
+
+   A given transform MAY have one or more Attributes.  Attributes are
+   necessary when the transform can be used in more than one way, as
+   when an encryption algorithm has a variable key size.  The transform
+   would specify the algorithm and the attribute would specify the key
+   size.  Most transforms do not have attributes.  A transform MUST NOT
+   have multiple attributes of the same type.  To propose alternate
+   values for an attribute (for example, multiple key sizes for the AES
+   encryption algorithm), and implementation MUST include multiple
+   Transforms with the same Transform Type each with a single Attribute.
+
+   Note that the semantics of Transforms and Attributes are quite
+   different from those in IKEv1.  In IKEv1, a single Transform carried
+   multiple algorithms for a protocol with one carried in the Transform
+   and the others carried in the Attributes.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 65]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                          <Proposals>                          ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 6:  Security Association Payload
+
+   o  Proposals (variable) - One or more proposal substructures.
+
+   The payload type for the Security Association Payload is thirty three
+   (33).
+
+3.3.1.  Proposal Substructure
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | 0 (last) or 2 |   RESERVED    |         Proposal Length       |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Proposal #    |  Protocol ID  |    SPI Size   |# of Transforms|
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   ~                        SPI (variable)                         ~
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                        <Transforms>                           ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 7:  Proposal Substructure
+
+   o  0 (last) or 2 (more) (1 octet) - Specifies whether this is the
+      last Proposal Substructure in the SA.  This syntax is inherited
+      from ISAKMP, but is unnecessary because the last Proposal could be
+      identified from the length of the SA.  The value (2) corresponds
+      to a Payload Type of Proposal in IKEv1, and the first four octets
+      of the Proposal structure are designed to look somewhat like the
+      header of a Payload.
+
+   o  RESERVED (1 octet) - MUST be sent as zero; MUST be ignored on
+      receipt.
+
+   o  Proposal Length (2 octets) - Length of this proposal, including
+      all transforms and attributes that follow.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 66]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  Proposal # (1 octet) - When a proposal is made, the first proposal
+      in an SA payload MUST be #1, and subsequent proposals MUST be one
+      more than the previous proposal (indicating an OR of the two
+      proposals).  When a proposal is accepted, the proposal number in
+      the SA payload MUST match the number on the proposal sent that was
+      accepted.
+
+   o  Protocol ID (1 octet) - Specifies the IPsec protocol identifier
+      for the current negotiation.  The defined values are:
+
+      Protocol                Protocol ID
+      -----------------------------------
+      RESERVED                0
+      IKE                     1
+      AH                      2
+      ESP                     3
+      RESERVED TO IANA        4-200
+      PRIVATE USE             201-255
+
+   o  SPI Size (1 octet) - For an initial IKE SA negotiation, this field
+      MUST be zero; the SPI is obtained from the outer header.  During
+      subsequent negotiations, it is equal to the size, in octets, of
+      the SPI of the corresponding protocol (8 for IKE, 4 for ESP and
+      AH).
+
+   o  # of Transforms (1 octet) - Specifies the number of transforms in
+      this proposal.
+
+   o  SPI (variable) - The sending entity's SPI.  Even if the SPI Size
+      is not a multiple of 4 octets, there is no padding applied to the
+      payload.  When the SPI Size field is zero, this field is not
+      present in the Security Association payload.
+
+   o  Transforms (variable) - One or more transform substructures.
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 67]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+3.3.2.  Transform Substructure
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | 0 (last) or 3 |   RESERVED    |        Transform Length       |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |Transform Type |   RESERVED    |          Transform ID         |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                      Transform Attributes                     ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 8:  Transform Substructure
+
+   o  0 (last) or 3 (more) (1 octet) - Specifies whether this is the
+      last Transform Substructure in the Proposal.  This syntax is
+      inherited from ISAKMP, but is unnecessary because the last
+      transform could be identified from the length of the proposal.
+      The value (3) corresponds to a Payload Type of Transform in IKEv1,
+      and the first four octets of the Transform structure are designed
+      to look somewhat like the header of a Payload.
+
+   o  RESERVED - MUST be sent as zero; MUST be ignored on receipt.
+
+   o  Transform Length - The length (in octets) of the Transform
+      Substructure including Header and Attributes.
+
+   o  Transform Type (1 octet) - The type of transform being specified
+      in this transform.  Different protocols support different
+      transform types.  For some protocols, some of the transforms may
+      be optional.  If a transform is optional and the initiator wishes
+      to propose that the transform be omitted, no transform of the
+      given type is included in the proposal.  If the initiator wishes
+      to make use of the transform optional to the responder, it
+      includes a transform substructure with transform ID = 0 as one of
+      the options.
+
+   o  Transform ID (2 octets) - The specific instance of the transform
+      type being proposed.
+
+   The transform type values are:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 68]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Description                     Trans.  Used In
+                                   Type
+   ------------------------------------------------------------------
+   RESERVED                        0
+   Encryption Algorithm (ENCR)     1       IKE and ESP
+   Pseudo-random Function (PRF)    2       IKE
+   Integrity Algorithm (INTEG)     3       IKE*, AH, optional in ESP
+   Diffie-Hellman Group (D-H)      4       IKE, optional in AH & ESP
+   Extended Sequence Numbers (ESN) 5       AH and ESP
+   RESERVED TO IANA                6-240
+   PRIVATE USE                     241-255
+
+   (*) Negotiating an integrity algorithm is mandatory for the
+   Encrypted payload format specified in this document. For example,
+   [AEAD] specifies additional formats based on authenticated
+   encryption, in which a separate integrity algorithm is not
+   negotiated.
+
+   For Transform Type 1 (Encryption Algorithm), defined Transform IDs
+   are:
+
+   Name                 Number      Defined In
+   ---------------------------------------------------
+   RESERVED             0
+   ENCR_DES_IV64        1           (UNSPECIFIED)
+   ENCR_DES             2           (RFC2405), [DES]
+   ENCR_3DES            3           (RFC2451)
+   ENCR_RC5             4           (RFC2451)
+   ENCR_IDEA            5           (RFC2451), [IDEA]
+   ENCR_CAST            6           (RFC2451)
+   ENCR_BLOWFISH        7           (RFC2451)
+   ENCR_3IDEA           8           (UNSPECIFIED)
+   ENCR_DES_IV32        9           (UNSPECIFIED)
+   RESERVED             10
+   ENCR_NULL            11          (RFC2410)
+   ENCR_AES_CBC         12          (RFC3602)
+   ENCR_AES_CTR         13          (RFC3686)
+   RESERVED TO IANA     14-1023
+   PRIVATE USE          1024-65535
+
+   For Transform Type 2 (Pseudo-random Function), defined Transform IDs
+   are:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 69]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Name                        Number    Defined In
+   ------------------------------------------------------
+   RESERVED                    0
+   PRF_HMAC_MD5                1         (RFC2104), [MD5]
+   PRF_HMAC_SHA1               2         (RFC2104), [SHA]
+   PRF_HMAC_TIGER              3         (RFC2104)
+   PRF_AES128_XCBC             4         (RFC4434)
+   RESERVED TO IANA            5-1023
+   PRIVATE USE                 1024-65535
+
+   For Transform Type 3 (Integrity Algorithm), defined Transform IDs
+   are:
+
+   Name                 Number   Defined In
+   ----------------------------------------
+   NONE                 0
+   AUTH_HMAC_MD5_96     1        (RFC2403)
+   AUTH_HMAC_SHA1_96    2        (RFC2404)
+   AUTH_DES_MAC         3        (UNSPECIFIED)
+   AUTH_KPDK_MD5        4        (UNSPECIFIED)
+   AUTH_AES_XCBC_96     5        (RFC3566)
+   RESERVED TO IANA     6-1023
+   PRIVATE USE          1024-65535
+
+   For Transform Type 4 (Diffie-Hellman Group), defined Transform IDs
+   are:
+
+   Name               Number     Defined in
+   ----------------------------------------
+   NONE               0
+   768 Bit MODP       1          Appendix B
+   1024 Bit MODP      2          Appendix B
+   RESERVED TO IANA   3-4
+   1536-bit MODP      5          [ADDGROUP]
+   RESERVED TO IANA   6-13
+   2048-bit MODP      14         [ADDGROUP]
+   3072-bit MODP      15         [ADDGROUP]
+   4096-bit MODP      16         [ADDGROUP]
+   6144-bit MODP      17         [ADDGROUP]
+   8192-bit MODP      18         [ADDGROUP]
+   RESERVED TO IANA   19-1023
+   PRIVATE USE        1024-65535
+
+   For Transform Type 5 (Extended Sequence Numbers), defined Transform
+   IDs are:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 70]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Name                               Number
+   --------------------------------------------
+   No Extended Sequence Numbers       0
+   Extended Sequence Numbers          1
+   RESERVED                           2 - 65535
+
+   {{ Clarif-4.4 }} Note that an initiator who supports ESNs will
+   usually include two ESN transforms, with values "0" and "1", in its
+   proposals.  A proposal containing a single ESN transform with value
+   "1" means that using normal (non-extended) sequence numbers is not
+   acceptable.
+
+   Numerous additional transform types have been defined since the
+   publication of RFC 4306.  Please refer to the IANA IKEv2 registry for
+   details.
+
+3.3.3.  Valid Transform Types by Protocol
+
+   The number and type of transforms that accompany an SA payload are
+   dependent on the protocol in the SA itself.  An SA payload proposing
+   the establishment of an SA has the following mandatory and optional
+   transform types.  A compliant implementation MUST understand all
+   mandatory and optional types for each protocol it supports (though it
+   need not accept proposals with unacceptable suites).  A proposal MAY
+   omit the optional types if the only value for them it will accept is
+   NONE.
+
+   Protocol    Mandatory Types          Optional Types
+   ---------------------------------------------------
+   IKE         ENCR, PRF, INTEG*, D-H
+   ESP         ENCR, ESN                INTEG, D-H
+   AH          INTEG, ESN               D-H
+
+   (*) Negotiating an integrity algorithm is mandatory for the
+   Encrypted payload format specified in this document. For example,
+   [AEAD] specifies additional formats based on authenticated
+   encryption, in which a separate integrity algorithm is not
+   negotiated.
+
+3.3.4.  Mandatory Transform IDs
+
+   The specification of suites that MUST and SHOULD be supported for
+   interoperability has been removed from this document because they are
+   likely to change more rapidly than this document evolves.
+
+   An important lesson learned from IKEv1 is that no system should only
+   implement the mandatory algorithms and expect them to be the best
+   choice for all customers.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 71]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   It is likely that IANA will add additional transforms in the future,
+   and some users may want to use private suites, especially for IKE
+   where implementations should be capable of supporting different
+   parameters, up to certain size limits.  In support of this goal, all
+   implementations of IKEv2 SHOULD include a management facility that
+   allows specification (by a user or system administrator) of Diffie-
+   Hellman (DH) parameters (the generator, modulus, and exponent lengths
+   and values) for new DH groups.  Implementations SHOULD provide a
+   management interface through which these parameters and the
+   associated transform IDs may be entered (by a user or system
+   administrator), to enable negotiating such groups.
+
+   All implementations of IKEv2 MUST include a management facility that
+   enables a user or system administrator to specify the suites that are
+   acceptable for use with IKE.  Upon receipt of a payload with a set of
+   transform IDs, the implementation MUST compare the transmitted
+   transform IDs against those locally configured via the management
+   controls, to verify that the proposed suite is acceptable based on
+   local policy.  The implementation MUST reject SA proposals that are
+   not authorized by these IKE suite controls.  Note that cryptographic
+   suites that MUST be implemented need not be configured as acceptable
+   to local policy.
+
+3.3.5.  Transform Attributes
+
+   Each transform in a Security Association payload may include
+   attributes that modify or complete the specification of the
+   transform.  The set of valid attributes depends on the transform.
+   Currently, only a single attribute type is defined: the Key Length
+   attribute is used by certain encryption transforms with variable-
+   length keys (see below for details).
+
+   The attributes are type/value pairs and are defined below.
+   Attributes can have a value with a fixed two-octet length or a
+   variable-length value.  For the latter, the attribute is encoded as
+   type/length/value.
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |A|       Attribute Type        |    AF=0  Attribute Length     |
+   |F|                             |    AF=1  Attribute Value      |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                   AF=0  Attribute Value                       |
+   |                   AF=1  Not Transmitted                       |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+                   Figure 9:  Data Attributes
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 72]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  Attribute Format (AF) (1 bit) - Indicates whether the data
+      attribute follow the Type/Length/Value (TLV) format or a shortened
+      Type/Value (TV) format.  If the AF bit is zero (0), then the
+      attribute uses TLV format; if the AF bit is one (1), the TV format
+      (with two-byte value) is used.
+
+   o  Attribute Type (15 bits) - Unique identifier for each type of
+      attribute (see below).
+
+   o  Attribute Value (variable length) - Value of the Attribute
+      associated with the Attribute Type.  If the AF bit is a zero (0),
+      this field has a variable length defined by the Attribute Length
+      field.  If the AF bit is a one (1), the Attribute Value has a
+      length of 2 octets.
+
+   Note that the only currently defined attribute type (Key Length) is
+   fixed length; the variable-length encoding specification is included
+   only for future extensions.  Attributes described as fixed length
+   MUST NOT be encoded using the variable-length encoding.  Variable-
+   length attributes MUST NOT be encoded as fixed-length even if their
+   value can fit into two octets.  NOTE: This is a change from IKEv1,
+   where increased flexibility may have simplified the composer of
+   messages but certainly complicated the parser.
+
+   Attribute Type         Value         Attribute Format
+   ------------------------------------------------------------
+   RESERVED               0-13
+   Key Length (in bits)   14            TV
+   RESERVED               15-17
+   RESERVED TO IANA       18-16383
+   PRIVATE USE            16384-32767
+
+   Values 0-13 and 15-17 were used in a similar context in IKEv1, and
+   should not be assigned except to matching values.
+
+   The Key Length attribute specifies the key length in bits (MUST use
+   network byte order) for certain transforms as follows: {{ Clarif-7.11
+   }}
+
+   o  The Key Length attribute MUST NOT be used with transforms that use
+      a fixed length key.  This includes, e.g., ENCR_DES, ENCR_IDEA, and
+      all the Type 2 (Pseudo-random function) and Type 3 (Integrity
+      Algorithm) transforms specified in this document.  It is
+      recommended that future Type 2 or 3 transforms do not use this
+      attribute.
+
+   o  Some transforms specify that the Key Length attribute MUST be
+      always included (omitting the attribute is not allowed, and
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 73]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      proposals not containing it MUST be rejected).  This includes,
+      e.g., ENCR_AES_CBC and ENCR_AES_CTR.
+
+   o  Some transforms allow variable-length keys, but also specify a
+      default key length if the attribute is not included.  These
+      transforms include, e.g., ENCR_RC5 and ENCR_BLOWFISH.
+
+   Implementation note: To further interoperability and to support
+   upgrading endpoints independently, implementers of this protocol
+   SHOULD accept values that they deem to supply greater security.  For
+   instance, if a peer is configured to accept a variable-length cipher
+   with a key length of X bits and is offered that cipher with a larger
+   key length, the implementation SHOULD accept the offer if it supports
+   use of the longer key.
+
+   Support of this capability allows a responder to express a concept of
+   "at least" a certain level of security -- "a key length of _at least_
+   X bits for cipher Y".  However, as the attribute is always returned
+   unchanged (see Section 3.3.6), an initiator willing to accept
+   multiple key lengths has to include multiple transforms with the same
+   Transform Type, each with different Key Length attribute.
+
+3.3.6.  Attribute Negotiation
+
+   During security association negotiation initiators present offers to
+   responders.  Responders MUST select a single complete set of
+   parameters from the offers (or reject all offers if none are
+   acceptable).  If there are multiple proposals, the responder MUST
+   choose a single proposal.  If the selected proposal has multiple
+   Transforms with the same type, the responder MUST choose a single
+   one.  Any attributes of a selected transform MUST be returned
+   unmodified.  The initiator of an exchange MUST check that the
+   accepted offer is consistent with one of its proposals, and if not
+   that response MUST be rejected.
+
+   If the responder receives a proposal that contains a Transform Type
+   it does not understand, or a proposal that is missing a mandatory
+   Transform Type, it MUST consider this proposal unacceptable; however,
+   other proposals in the same SA payload are processed as usual.
+   Similarly, if the responder receives a transform that contains a
+   Transform Attribute it does not understand, it MUST consider this
+   transform unacceptable; other transforms with the same Transform Type
+   are processed as usual.  This allows new Transform Types and
+   Transform Attributes to be defined in the future.
+
+   Negotiating Diffie-Hellman groups presents some special challenges.
+   SA offers include proposed attributes and a Diffie-Hellman public
+   number (KE) in the same message.  If in the initial exchange the
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 74]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   initiator offers to use one of several Diffie-Hellman groups, it
+   SHOULD pick the one the responder is most likely to accept and
+   include a KE corresponding to that group.  If the guess turns out to
+   be wrong, the responder will indicate the correct group in the
+   response and the initiator SHOULD pick an element of that group for
+   its KE value when retrying the first message.  It SHOULD, however,
+   continue to propose its full supported set of groups in order to
+   prevent a man-in-the-middle downgrade attack.
+
+3.4.  Key Exchange Payload
+
+   The Key Exchange Payload, denoted KE in this memo, is used to
+   exchange Diffie-Hellman public numbers as part of a Diffie-Hellman
+   key exchange.  The Key Exchange Payload consists of the IKE generic
+   payload header followed by the Diffie-Hellman public value itself.
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |          DH Group #           |           RESERVED            |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                       Key Exchange Data                       ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+             Figure 10:  Key Exchange Payload Format
+
+   A key exchange payload is constructed by copying one's Diffie-Hellman
+   public value into the "Key Exchange Data" portion of the payload.
+   The length of the Diffie-Hellman public value MUST be equal to the
+   length of the prime modulus over which the exponentiation was
+   performed, prepending zero bits to the value if necessary.
+
+   The DH Group # identifies the Diffie-Hellman group in which the Key
+   Exchange Data was computed (see Section 3.3.2).  If the selected
+   proposal uses a different Diffie-Hellman group (other than NONE), the
+   message MUST be rejected with a Notify payload of type
+   INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD.
+
+   The payload type for the Key Exchange payload is thirty four (34).
+
+3.5.  Identification Payloads
+
+   The Identification Payloads, denoted IDi and IDr in this memo, allow
+   peers to assert an identity to one another.  This identity may be
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 75]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   used for policy lookup, but does not necessarily have to match
+   anything in the CERT payload; both fields may be used by an
+   implementation to perform access control decisions. {{ Clarif-7.1 }}
+   When using the ID_IPV4_ADDR/ID_IPV6_ADDR identity types in IDi/IDr
+   payloads, IKEv2 does not require this address to match the address in
+   the IP header of IKEv2 packets, or anything in the TSi/TSr payloads.
+   The contents of IDi/IDr is used purely to fetch the policy and
+   authentication data related to the other party.
+
+   NOTE: In IKEv1, two ID payloads were used in each direction to hold
+   Traffic Selector (TS) information for data passing over the SA.  In
+   IKEv2, this information is carried in TS payloads (see Section 3.13).
+
+   The Identification Payload consists of the IKE generic payload header
+   followed by identification fields as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |   ID Type     |                 RESERVED                      |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                   Identification Data                         ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 11:  Identification Payload Format
+
+   o  ID Type (1 octet) - Specifies the type of Identification being
+      used.
+
+   o  RESERVED - MUST be sent as zero; MUST be ignored on receipt.
+
+   o  Identification Data (variable length) - Value, as indicated by the
+      Identification Type.  The length of the Identification Data is
+      computed from the size in the ID payload header.
+
+   The payload types for the Identification Payload are thirty five (35)
+   for IDi and thirty six (36) for IDr.
+
+   The following table lists the assigned values for the Identification
+   Type field:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 76]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   ID Type                           Value
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   RESERVED                            0
+
+   ID_IPV4_ADDR                        1
+       A single four (4) octet IPv4 address.
+
+   ID_FQDN                             2
+       A fully-qualified domain name string.  An example of a ID_FQDN
+       is, "example.com".  The string MUST not contain any terminators
+       (e.g., NULL, CR, etc.). All characters in the ID_FQDN are ASCII;
+        for an "internationalized domain name", the syntax is as defined
+       in [IDNA], for example "xn--tmonesimerkki-bfbb.example.net".
+
+   ID_RFC822_ADDR                      3
+       A fully-qualified RFC822 email address string, An example of a
+       ID_RFC822_ADDR is, "jsmith@example.com".  The string MUST not
+       contain any terminators. Because of [EAI], implementations would
+       be wise to treat this field as UTF-8 encoded text, not as
+       pure ASCII.
+
+   RESERVED TO IANA                    4
+
+   ID_IPV6_ADDR                        5
+       A single sixteen (16) octet IPv6 address.
+
+   RESERVED TO IANA                    6 - 8
+
+   ID_DER_ASN1_DN                      9
+       The binary Distinguished Encoding Rules (DER) encoding of an
+       ASN.1 X.500 Distinguished Name [X.501].
+
+   ID_DER_ASN1_GN                      10
+       The binary DER encoding of an ASN.1 X.500 GeneralName [X.509].
+
+   ID_KEY_ID                           11
+       An opaque octet stream which may be used to pass vendor-
+       specific information necessary to do certain proprietary
+       types of identification.
+
+   RESERVED TO IANA                    12-200
+
+   PRIVATE USE                         201-255
+
+   Two implementations will interoperate only if each can generate a
+   type of ID acceptable to the other.  To assure maximum
+   interoperability, implementations MUST be configurable to send at
+   least one of ID_IPV4_ADDR, ID_FQDN, ID_RFC822_ADDR, or ID_KEY_ID, and
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 77]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   MUST be configurable to accept all of these types.  Implementations
+   SHOULD be capable of generating and accepting all of these types.
+   IPv6-capable implementations MUST additionally be configurable to
+   accept ID_IPV6_ADDR.  IPv6-only implementations MAY be configurable
+   to send only ID_IPV6_ADDR.
+
+   {{ Clarif-3.4 }} EAP [EAP] does not mandate the use of any particular
+   type of identifier, but often EAP is used with Network Access
+   Identifiers (NAIs) defined in [NAI].  Although NAIs look a bit like
+   email addresses (e.g., "joe@example.com"), the syntax is not exactly
+   the same as the syntax of email address in [MAILFORMAT].  For those
+   NAIs that include the realm component, the ID_RFC822_ADDR
+   identification type SHOULD be used.  Responder implementations should
+   not attempt to verify that the contents actually conform to the exact
+   syntax given in [MAILFORMAT], but instead should accept any
+   reasonable-looking NAI.  For NAIs that do not include the realm
+   component,the ID_KEY_ID identification type SHOULD be used.
+
+3.6.  Certificate Payload
+
+   The Certificate Payload, denoted CERT in this memo, provides a means
+   to transport certificates or other authentication-related information
+   via IKE.  Certificate payloads SHOULD be included in an exchange if
+   certificates are available to the sender unless the peer has
+   indicated an ability to retrieve this information from elsewhere
+   using an HTTP_CERT_LOOKUP_SUPPORTED Notify payload.  Note that the
+   term "Certificate Payload" is somewhat misleading, because not all
+   authentication mechanisms use certificates and data other than
+   certificates may be passed in this payload.
+
+   The Certificate Payload is defined as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Cert Encoding |                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                                               |
+   ~                       Certificate Data                        ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+             Figure 12:  Certificate Payload Format
+
+   o  Certificate Encoding (1 octet) - This field indicates the type of
+      certificate or certificate-related information contained in the
+      Certificate Data field.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 78]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      Certificate Encoding                 Value
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+      RESERVED                             0
+      PKCS #7 wrapped X.509 certificate    1   UNSPECIFIED
+      PGP Certificate                      2   UNSPECIFIED
+      DNS Signed Key                       3   UNSPECIFIED
+      X.509 Certificate - Signature        4
+      Kerberos Token                       6   UNSPECIFIED
+      Certificate Revocation List (CRL)    7
+      Authority Revocation List (ARL)      8   UNSPECIFIED
+      SPKI Certificate                     9   UNSPECIFIED
+      X.509 Certificate - Attribute        10  UNSPECIFIED
+      Raw RSA Key                          11
+      Hash and URL of X.509 certificate    12
+      Hash and URL of X.509 bundle         13
+      RESERVED to IANA                     14 - 200
+      PRIVATE USE                          201 - 255
+
+   o  Certificate Data (variable length) - Actual encoding of
+      certificate data.  The type of certificate is indicated by the
+      Certificate Encoding field.
+
+   The payload type for the Certificate Payload is thirty seven (37).
+
+   Specific syntax for some of the certificate type codes above is not
+   defined in this document.  The types whose syntax is defined in this
+   document are:
+
+   o  X.509 Certificate - Signature (4) contains a DER encoded X.509
+      certificate whose public key is used to validate the sender's AUTH
+      payload.
+
+   o  Certificate Revocation List (7) contains a DER encoded X.509
+      certificate revocation list.
+
+   o  {{ Added "DER-encoded RSAPublicKey structure" from Clarif-3.6 }}
+      Raw RSA Key (11) contains a PKCS #1 encoded RSA key, that is, a
+      DER-encoded RSAPublicKey structure (see [RSA] and [PKCS1]).
+
+   o  Hash and URL encodings (12-13) allow IKE messages to remain short
+      by replacing long data structures with a 20 octet SHA-1 hash (see
+      [SHA]) of the replaced value followed by a variable-length URL
+      that resolves to the DER encoded data structure itself.  This
+      improves efficiency when the endpoints have certificate data
+      cached and makes IKE less subject to denial of service attacks
+      that become easier to mount when IKE messages are large enough to
+      require IP fragmentation [DOSUDPPROT].
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 79]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Use the following ASN.1 definition for an X.509 bundle:
+
+   CertBundle
+     { iso(1) identified-organization(3) dod(6) internet(1)
+       security(5) mechanisms(5) pkix(7) id-mod(0)
+       id-mod-cert-bundle(34) }
+
+   DEFINITIONS EXPLICIT TAGS ::=
+   BEGIN
+
+   IMPORTS
+     Certificate, CertificateList
+     FROM PKIX1Explicit88
+        { iso(1) identified-organization(3) dod(6)
+          internet(1) security(5) mechanisms(5) pkix(7)
+          id-mod(0) id-pkix1-explicit(18) } ;
+
+   CertificateOrCRL ::= CHOICE {
+     cert [0] Certificate,
+     crl  [1] CertificateList }
+
+   CertificateBundle ::= SEQUENCE OF CertificateOrCRL
+
+   END
+
+   Implementations MUST be capable of being configured to send and
+   accept up to four X.509 certificates in support of authentication,
+   and also MUST be capable of being configured to send and accept the
+   two Hash and URL formats (with HTTP URLs).  Implementations SHOULD be
+   capable of being configured to send and accept Raw RSA keys.  If
+   multiple certificates are sent, the first certificate MUST contain
+   the public key used to sign the AUTH payload.  The other certificates
+   may be sent in any order.
+
+3.7.  Certificate Request Payload
+
+   The Certificate Request Payload, denoted CERTREQ in this memo,
+   provides a means to request preferred certificates via IKE and can
+   appear in the IKE_INIT_SA response and/or the IKE_AUTH request.
+   Certificate Request payloads MAY be included in an exchange when the
+   sender needs to get the certificate of the receiver.  If multiple CAs
+   are trusted and the certificate encoding does not allow a list, then
+   multiple Certificate Request payloads would need to be transmitted.
+
+   The Certificate Request Payload is defined as follows:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 80]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Cert Encoding |                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                                               |
+   ~                    Certification Authority                    ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+         Figure 13:  Certificate Request Payload Format
+
+   o  Certificate Encoding (1 octet) - Contains an encoding of the type
+      or format of certificate requested.  Values are listed in
+      Section 3.6.
+
+   o  Certification Authority (variable length) - Contains an encoding
+      of an acceptable certification authority for the type of
+      certificate requested.
+
+   The payload type for the Certificate Request Payload is thirty eight
+   (38).
+
+   The Certificate Encoding field has the same values as those defined
+   in Section 3.6.  The Certification Authority field contains an
+   indicator of trusted authorities for this certificate type.  The
+   Certification Authority value is a concatenated list of SHA-1 hashes
+   of the public keys of trusted Certification Authorities (CAs).  Each
+   is encoded as the SHA-1 hash of the Subject Public Key Info element
+   (see section 4.1.2.7 of [PKIX]) from each Trust Anchor certificate.
+   The twenty-octet hashes are concatenated and included with no other
+   formatting.
+
+   {{ Clarif-3.6 }} The contents of the "Certification Authority" field
+   are defined only for X.509 certificates, which are types 4, 10, 12,
+   and 13.  Other values SHOULD NOT be used until standards-track
+   specifications that specify their use are published.
+
+   Note that the term "Certificate Request" is somewhat misleading, in
+   that values other than certificates are defined in a "Certificate"
+   payload and requests for those values can be present in a Certificate
+   Request Payload.  The syntax of the Certificate Request payload in
+   such cases is not defined in this document.
+
+   The Certificate Request Payload is processed by inspecting the "Cert
+   Encoding" field to determine whether the processor has any
+   certificates of this type.  If so, the "Certification Authority"
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 81]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   field is inspected to determine if the processor has any certificates
+   that can be validated up to one of the specified certification
+   authorities.  This can be a chain of certificates.
+
+   If an end-entity certificate exists that satisfies the criteria
+   specified in the CERTREQ, a certificate or certificate chain SHOULD
+   be sent back to the certificate requestor if the recipient of the
+   CERTREQ:
+
+   o  is configured to use certificate authentication,
+
+   o  is allowed to send a CERT payload,
+
+   o  has matching CA trust policy governing the current negotiation,
+      and
+
+   o  has at least one time-wise and usage appropriate end-entity
+      certificate chaining to a CA provided in the CERTREQ.
+
+   Certificate revocation checking must be considered during the
+   chaining process used to select a certificate.  Note that even if two
+   peers are configured to use two different CAs, cross-certification
+   relationships should be supported by appropriate selection logic.
+
+   The intent is not to prevent communication through the strict
+   adherence of selection of a certificate based on CERTREQ, when an
+   alternate certificate could be selected by the sender that would
+   still enable the recipient to successfully validate and trust it
+   through trust conveyed by cross-certification, CRLs, or other out-of-
+   band configured means.  Thus, the processing of a CERTREQ should be
+   seen as a suggestion for a certificate to select, not a mandated one.
+   If no certificates exist, then the CERTREQ is ignored.  This is not
+   an error condition of the protocol.  There may be cases where there
+   is a preferred CA sent in the CERTREQ, but an alternate might be
+   acceptable (perhaps after prompting a human operator).
+
+   {{ 3.10.1-16392 }} The HTTP_CERT_LOOKUP_SUPPORTED notification MAY be
+   included in any message that can include a CERTREQ payload and
+   indicates that the sender is capable of looking up certificates based
+   on an HTTP-based URL (and hence presumably would prefer to receive
+   certificate specifications in that format).
+
+3.8.  Authentication Payload
+
+   The Authentication Payload, denoted AUTH in this memo, contains data
+   used for authentication purposes.  The syntax of the Authentication
+   data varies according to the Auth Method as specified below.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 82]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   The Authentication Payload is defined as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Auth Method   |                RESERVED                       |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                      Authentication Data                      ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+              Figure 14:  Authentication Payload Format
+
+   o  Auth Method (1 octet) - Specifies the method of authentication
+      used.  Values defined are:
+
+      *  RSA Digital Signature (1) - Computed as specified in
+         Section 2.15 using an RSA private key with RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5
+         signature scheme specified in [PKCS1] (implementors should note
+         that IKEv1 used a different method for RSA signatures) {{
+         Clarif-3.3 }}. {{ Clarif-3.2 }} To promote interoperability,
+         implementations that support this type SHOULD support
+         signatures that use SHA-1 as the hash function and SHOULD use
+         SHA-1 as the default hash function when generating signatures.
+
+      *  Shared Key Message Integrity Code (2) - Computed as specified
+         in Section 2.15 using the shared key associated with the
+         identity in the ID payload and the negotiated prf function
+
+      *  DSS Digital Signature (3) - Computed as specified in
+         Section 2.15 using a DSS private key (see [DSS]) over a SHA-1
+         hash.
+
+      *  The values 0 and 4-200 are reserved to IANA.  The values 201-
+         255 are available for private use.
+
+   o  Authentication Data (variable length) - see Section 2.15.
+
+   The payload type for the Authentication Payload is thirty nine (39).
+
+3.9.  Nonce Payload
+
+   The Nonce Payload, denoted Ni and Nr in this memo for the initiator's
+   and responder's nonce respectively, contains random data used to
+   guarantee liveness during an exchange and protect against replay
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 83]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   attacks.
+
+   The Nonce Payload is defined as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                            Nonce Data                         ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+                Figure 15:  Nonce Payload Format
+
+   o  Nonce Data (variable length) - Contains the random data generated
+      by the transmitting entity.
+
+   The payload type for the Nonce Payload is forty (40).
+
+   The size of a Nonce MUST be between 16 and 256 octets inclusive.
+   Nonce values MUST NOT be reused.
+
+3.10.  Notify Payload
+
+   The Notify Payload, denoted N in this document, is used to transmit
+   informational data, such as error conditions and state transitions,
+   to an IKE peer.  A Notify Payload may appear in a response message
+   (usually specifying why a request was rejected), in an INFORMATIONAL
+   Exchange (to report an error not in an IKE request), or in any other
+   message to indicate sender capabilities or to modify the meaning of
+   the request.
+
+   The Notify Payload is defined as follows:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 84]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |  Protocol ID  |   SPI Size    |      Notify Message Type      |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                Security Parameter Index (SPI)                 ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                       Notification Data                       ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 16:  Notify Payload Format
+
+   o  Protocol ID (1 octet) - If this notification concerns an existing
+      SA whose SPI is given the SPI field, this field indicates the type
+      of that SA.  For notifications concerning IPsec SAs this field
+      MUST contain either (2) to indicate AH or (3) to indicate ESP. {{
+      Clarif-7.8 }} Of the notifications defined in this document, the
+      SPI is included only with INVALID_SELECTORS and REKEY_SA.  If the
+      SPI field is empty, this field MUST be sent as zero and MUST be
+      ignored on receipt.  All other values for this field are reserved
+      to IANA for future assignment.
+
+   o  SPI Size (1 octet) - Length in octets of the SPI as defined by the
+      IPsec protocol ID or zero if no SPI is applicable.  For a
+      notification concerning the IKE SA, the SPI Size MUST be zero and
+      the field must be empty.
+
+   o  Notify Message Type (2 octets) - Specifies the type of
+      notification message.
+
+   o  SPI (variable length) - Security Parameter Index.
+
+   o  Notification Data (variable length) - Informational or error data
+      transmitted in addition to the Notify Message Type.  Values for
+      this field are type specific (see below).
+
+   The payload type for the Notify Payload is forty one (41).
+
+3.10.1.  Notify Message Types
+
+   Notification information can be error messages specifying why an SA
+   could not be established.  It can also be status data that a process
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 85]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   managing an SA database wishes to communicate with a peer process.
+   The table below lists the Notification messages and their
+   corresponding values.  The number of different error statuses was
+   greatly reduced from IKEv1 both for simplification and to avoid
+   giving configuration information to probers.
+
+   Types in the range 0 - 16383 are intended for reporting errors.  An
+   implementation receiving a Notify payload with one of these types
+   that it does not recognize in a response MUST assume that the
+   corresponding request has failed entirely. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }}
+   Unrecognized error types in a request and status types in a request
+   or response MUST be ignored, and they should be logged.
+
+   Notify payloads with status types MAY be added to any message and
+   MUST be ignored if not recognized.  They are intended to indicate
+   capabilities, and as part of SA negotiation are used to negotiate
+   non-cryptographic parameters.
+
+   NOTIFY messages: error types              Value
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+   RESERVED                                  0
+
+   UNSUPPORTED_CRITICAL_PAYLOAD              1
+       See Section 2.5.
+
+   INVALID_IKE_SPI                           4
+       See Section 2.21.
+
+   INVALID_MAJOR_VERSION                     5
+       See Section 2.5.
+
+   INVALID_SYNTAX                            7
+       Indicates the IKE message that was received was invalid because
+       some type, length, or value was out of range or because the
+       request was rejected for policy reasons. To avoid a denial of
+       service attack using forged messages, this status may only be
+       returned for and in an encrypted packet if the message ID and
+       cryptographic checksum were valid. To avoid leaking information
+       to someone probing a node, this status MUST be sent in response
+       to any error not covered by one of the other status types.
+       {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} To aid debugging, more detailed error
+       information should be written to a console or log.
+
+   INVALID_MESSAGE_ID                        9
+       See Section 2.3.
+
+   INVALID_SPI                              11
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 86]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+       See Section 1.5.
+
+   NO_PROPOSAL_CHOSEN                       14
+       See Section 2.7.
+
+   INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD                       17
+       See Section 1.3.
+
+   AUTHENTICATION_FAILED                    24
+       Sent in the response to an IKE_AUTH message when for some reason
+       the authentication failed. There is no associated data.
+
+   SINGLE_PAIR_REQUIRED                     34
+       See Section 2.9.
+
+   NO_ADDITIONAL_SAS                        35
+       See Section 1.3.
+
+   INTERNAL_ADDRESS_FAILURE                 36
+       See Section 3.15.4.
+
+   FAILED_CP_REQUIRED                       37
+       See Section 2.19.
+
+   TS_UNACCEPTABLE                          38
+       See Section 2.9.
+
+   INVALID_SELECTORS                        39
+       MAY be sent in an IKE INFORMATIONAL exchange when a node receives
+       an ESP or AH packet whose selectors do not match those of the SA
+       on which it was delivered (and that caused the packet to be
+       dropped). The Notification Data contains the start of the
+       offending packet (as in ICMP messages) and the SPI field of the
+       notification is set to match the SPI of the IPsec SA.
+
+   RESERVED TO IANA                         40-8191
+
+   PRIVATE USE                              8192-16383
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 87]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   NOTIFY messages: status types            Value
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+   INITIAL_CONTACT                          16384
+       See Section 2.4.
+
+   SET_WINDOW_SIZE                          16385
+       See Section 2.3.
+
+   ADDITIONAL_TS_POSSIBLE                   16386
+       See Section 2.9.
+
+   IPCOMP_SUPPORTED                         16387
+       See Section 2.22.
+
+   NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP                  16388
+       See Section 2.23.
+
+   NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP             16389
+       See Section 2.23.
+
+   COOKIE                                   16390
+       See Section 2.6.
+
+   USE_TRANSPORT_MODE                       16391
+       See Section 1.3.1.
+
+   HTTP_CERT_LOOKUP_SUPPORTED               16392
+       See Section 3.6.
+
+   REKEY_SA                                 16393
+       See Section 1.3.3.
+
+   ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED            16394
+       See Section 1.3.1.
+
+   NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO                 16395
+       See Section 1.3.1.
+
+   RESERVED TO IANA                         16396-40959
+
+   PRIVATE USE                              40960-65535
+
+3.11.  Delete Payload
+
+   The Delete Payload, denoted D in this memo, contains a protocol
+   specific security association identifier that the sender has removed
+   from its security association database and is, therefore, no longer
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 88]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   valid.  Figure 17 shows the format of the Delete Payload.  It is
+   possible to send multiple SPIs in a Delete payload; however, each SPI
+   MUST be for the same protocol.  Mixing of protocol identifiers MUST
+   NOT be performed in the Delete payload.  It is permitted, however, to
+   include multiple Delete payloads in a single INFORMATIONAL exchange
+   where each Delete payload lists SPIs for a different protocol.
+
+   Deletion of the IKE SA is indicated by a protocol ID of 1 (IKE) but
+   no SPIs.  Deletion of a Child SA, such as ESP or AH, will contain the
+   IPsec protocol ID of that protocol (2 for AH, 3 for ESP), and the SPI
+   is the SPI the sending endpoint would expect in inbound ESP or AH
+   packets.
+
+   The Delete Payload is defined as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Protocol ID   |   SPI Size    |           # of SPIs           |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~               Security Parameter Index(es) (SPI)              ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+               Figure 17:  Delete Payload Format
+
+   o  Protocol ID (1 octet) - Must be 1 for an IKE SA, 2 for AH, or 3
+      for ESP.
+
+   o  SPI Size (1 octet) - Length in octets of the SPI as defined by the
+      protocol ID.  It MUST be zero for IKE (SPI is in message header)
+      or four for AH and ESP.
+
+   o  # of SPIs (2 octets) - The number of SPIs contained in the Delete
+      payload.  The size of each SPI is defined by the SPI Size field.
+
+   o  Security Parameter Index(es) (variable length) - Identifies the
+      specific security association(s) to delete.  The length of this
+      field is determined by the SPI Size and # of SPIs fields.
+
+   The payload type for the Delete Payload is forty two (42).
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 89]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+3.12.  Vendor ID Payload
+
+   The Vendor ID Payload, denoted V in this memo, contains a vendor
+   defined constant.  The constant is used by vendors to identify and
+   recognize remote instances of their implementations.  This mechanism
+   allows a vendor to experiment with new features while maintaining
+   backward compatibility.
+
+   A Vendor ID payload MAY announce that the sender is capable of
+   accepting certain extensions to the protocol, or it MAY simply
+   identify the implementation as an aid in debugging.  A Vendor ID
+   payload MUST NOT change the interpretation of any information defined
+   in this specification (i.e., the critical bit MUST be set to 0).
+   Multiple Vendor ID payloads MAY be sent.  An implementation is NOT
+   REQUIRED to send any Vendor ID payload at all.
+
+   A Vendor ID payload may be sent as part of any message.  Reception of
+   a familiar Vendor ID payload allows an implementation to make use of
+   Private USE numbers described throughout this memo-- private
+   payloads, private exchanges, private notifications, etc.  Unfamiliar
+   Vendor IDs MUST be ignored.
+
+   Writers of Internet-Drafts who wish to extend this protocol MUST
+   define a Vendor ID payload to announce the ability to implement the
+   extension in the Internet-Draft.  It is expected that Internet-Drafts
+   that gain acceptance and are standardized will be given "magic
+   numbers" out of the Future Use range by IANA, and the requirement to
+   use a Vendor ID will go away.
+
+   The Vendor ID Payload fields are defined as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                        Vendor ID (VID)                        ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+              Figure 18:  Vendor ID Payload Format
+
+   o  Vendor ID (variable length) - It is the responsibility of the
+      person choosing the Vendor ID to assure its uniqueness in spite of
+      the absence of any central registry for IDs.  Good practice is to
+      include a company name, a person name, or some such.  If you want
+      to show off, you might include the latitude and longitude and time
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 90]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      where you were when you chose the ID and some random input.  A
+      message digest of a long unique string is preferable to the long
+      unique string itself.
+
+   The payload type for the Vendor ID Payload is forty three (43).
+
+3.13.  Traffic Selector Payload
+
+   The Traffic Selector Payload, denoted TS in this memo, allows peers
+   to identify packet flows for processing by IPsec security services.
+   The Traffic Selector Payload consists of the IKE generic payload
+   header followed by individual traffic selectors as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Number of TSs |                 RESERVED                      |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                       <Traffic Selectors>                     ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 19:  Traffic Selectors Payload Format
+
+   o  Number of TSs (1 octet) - Number of traffic selectors being
+      provided.
+
+   o  RESERVED - This field MUST be sent as zero and MUST be ignored on
+      receipt.
+
+   o  Traffic Selectors (variable length) - One or more individual
+      traffic selectors.
+
+   The length of the Traffic Selector payload includes the TS header and
+   all the traffic selectors.
+
+   The payload type for the Traffic Selector payload is forty four (44)
+   for addresses at the initiator's end of the SA and forty five (45)
+   for addresses at the responder's end.
+
+   {{ Clarif-4.7 }} There is no requirement that TSi and TSr contain the
+   same number of individual traffic selectors.  Thus, they are
+   interpreted as follows: a packet matches a given TSi/TSr if it
+   matches at least one of the individual selectors in TSi, and at least
+   one of the individual selectors in TSr.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 91]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   For instance, the following traffic selectors:
+
+   TSi = ((17, 100, 192.0.1.66-192.0.1.66),
+          (17, 200, 192.0.1.66-192.0.1.66))
+   TSr = ((17, 300, 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255),
+          (17, 400, 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255))
+
+   would match UDP packets from 192.0.1.66 to anywhere, with any of the
+   four combinations of source/destination ports (100,300), (100,400),
+   (200,300), and (200, 400).
+
+   Thus, some types of policies may require several Child SA pairs.  For
+   instance, a policy matching only source/destination ports (100,300)
+   and (200,400), but not the other two combinations, cannot be
+   negotiated as a single Child SA pair.
+
+3.13.1.  Traffic Selector
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |   TS Type     |IP Protocol ID*|       Selector Length         |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |           Start Port*         |           End Port*           |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                         Starting Address*                     ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                         Ending Address*                       ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+               Figure 20: Traffic Selector
+
+   *Note: All fields other than TS Type and Selector Length depend on
+   the TS Type.  The fields shown are for TS Types 7 and 8, the only two
+   values currently defined.
+
+   o  TS Type (one octet) - Specifies the type of traffic selector.
+
+   o  IP protocol ID (1 octet) - Value specifying an associated IP
+      protocol ID (e.g., UDP/TCP/ICMP).  A value of zero means that the
+      protocol ID is not relevant to this traffic selector-- the SA can
+      carry all protocols.
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 92]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  Selector Length - Specifies the length of this Traffic Selector
+      Substructure including the header.
+
+   o  Start Port (2 octets) - Value specifying the smallest port number
+      allowed by this Traffic Selector.  For protocols for which port is
+      undefined (including protocol 0), or if all ports are allowed,
+      this field MUST be zero.  For the ICMP protocol, the two one-octet
+      fields Type and Code are treated as a single 16-bit integer (with
+      Type in the most significant eight bits and Code in the least
+      significant eight bits) port number for the purposes of filtering
+      based on this field.
+
+   o  End Port (2 octets) - Value specifying the largest port number
+      allowed by this Traffic Selector.  For protocols for which port is
+      undefined (including protocol 0), or if all ports are allowed,
+      this field MUST be 65535.  For the ICMP protocol, the two one-
+      octet fields Type and Code are treated as a single 16-bit integer
+      (with Type in the most significant eight bits and Code in the
+      least significant eight bits) port number for the purposed of
+      filtering based on this field.
+
+   o  Starting Address - The smallest address included in this Traffic
+      Selector (length determined by TS type).
+
+   o  Ending Address - The largest address included in this Traffic
+      Selector (length determined by TS type).
+
+   Systems that are complying with [IPSECARCH] that wish to indicate
+   "ANY" ports MUST set the start port to 0 and the end port to 65535;
+   note that according to [IPSECARCH], "ANY" includes "OPAQUE".  Systems
+   working with [IPSECARCH] that wish to indicate "OPAQUE" ports, but
+   not "ANY" ports, MUST set the start port to 65535 and the end port to
+   0.
+
+   {{ Added from Clarif-4.8 }} The traffic selector types 7 and 8 can
+   also refer to ICMP type and code fields.  Note, however, that ICMP
+   packets do not have separate source and destination port fields.  The
+   method for specifying the traffic selectors for ICMP is shown by
+   example in Section 4.4.1.3 of [IPSECARCH].
+
+   {{ Added from Clarif-4.9 }} Traffic selectors can use IP Protocol ID
+   135 to match the IPv6 mobility header [MIPV6].  This document does
+   not specify how to represent the "MH Type" field in traffic
+   selectors, although it is likely that a different document will
+   specify this in the future.  Note that [IPSECARCH] says that the IPv6
+   mobility header (MH) message type is placed in the most significant
+   eight bits of the 16-bit local port selector.  The direction
+   semantics of TSi/TSr port fields are the same as for ICMP.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 93]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   The following table lists the assigned values for the Traffic
+   Selector Type field and the corresponding Address Selector Data.
+
+   TS Type                            Value
+   -------------------------------------------------------------------
+   RESERVED                            0-6
+
+   TS_IPV4_ADDR_RANGE                  7
+
+       A range of IPv4 addresses, represented by two four-octet
+       values. The first value is the beginning IPv4 address
+       (inclusive) and the second value is the ending IPv4 address
+       (inclusive). All addresses falling between the two specified
+       addresses are considered to be within the list.
+
+   TS_IPV6_ADDR_RANGE                  8
+
+       A range of IPv6 addresses, represented by two sixteen-octet
+       values. The first value is the beginning IPv6 address
+       (inclusive) and the second value is the ending IPv6 address
+       (inclusive). All addresses falling between the two specified
+       addresses are considered to be within the list.
+
+   RESERVED TO IANA                    9-240
+   PRIVATE USE                         241-255
+
+3.14.  Encrypted Payload
+
+   The Encrypted Payload, denoted SK{...} or E in this memo, contains
+   other payloads in encrypted form.  The Encrypted Payload, if present
+   in a message, MUST be the last payload in the message.  Often, it is
+   the only payload in the message.
+
+   The algorithms for encryption and integrity protection are negotiated
+   during IKE SA setup, and the keys are computed as specified in
+   Section 2.14 and Section 2.18.
+
+   This document specifies the cryptographic processing of Encrypted
+   payloads using a block cipher in CBC mode and an integrity check
+   algorithm that computes a fixed-length checksum over a variable size
+   message.  The design is modeled after the ESP algorithms described in
+   RFCs 2104 [HMAC], 4303 [ESP], and 2451 [ESPCBC].  This document
+   completely specifies the cryptographic processing of IKE data, but
+   those documents should be consulted for design rationale.  Future
+   documents may specify the processing of Encrypted payloads for other
+   types of transforms, such as counter mode encryption and
+   authenticated encryption algorithms.  Peers MUST NOT negotiate
+   transforms for which no such specification exists.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 94]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   The payload type for an Encrypted payload is forty six (46).  The
+   Encrypted Payload consists of the IKE generic payload header followed
+   by individual fields as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                     Initialization Vector                     |
+   |         (length is block size for encryption algorithm)       |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   ~                    Encrypted IKE Payloads                     ~
+   +               +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |               |             Padding (0-255 octets)            |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+                               +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                               |  Pad Length   |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   ~                    Integrity Checksum Data                    ~
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 21:  Encrypted Payload Format
+
+   o  Next Payload - The payload type of the first embedded payload.
+      Note that this is an exception in the standard header format,
+      since the Encrypted payload is the last payload in the message and
+      therefore the Next Payload field would normally be zero.  But
+      because the content of this payload is embedded payloads and there
+      was no natural place to put the type of the first one, that type
+      is placed here.
+
+   o  Payload Length - Includes the lengths of the header, IV, Encrypted
+      IKE Payloads, Padding, Pad Length, and Integrity Checksum Data.
+
+   o  Initialization Vector - For CBC mode ciphers, the length of the
+      initialization vector (IV) is equal to the block length of the
+      underlying encryption algorithm.  Senders MUST select a new
+      unpredictable IV for every message; recipients MUST accept any
+      value.  For other modes than CBC, the IV format and processing is
+      specified in the document specifying the encryption algorithm and
+      mode.  The reader is encouraged to consult [MODES] for advice on
+      IV generation.  In particular, using the final ciphertext block of
+      the previous message is not considered unpredictable.
+
+   o  IKE Payloads are as specified earlier in this section.  This field
+      is encrypted with the negotiated cipher.
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 95]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  Padding MAY contain any value chosen by the sender, and MUST have
+      a length that makes the combination of the Payloads, the Padding,
+      and the Pad Length to be a multiple of the encryption block size.
+      This field is encrypted with the negotiated cipher.
+
+   o  Pad Length is the length of the Padding field.  The sender SHOULD
+      set the Pad Length to the minimum value that makes the combination
+      of the Payloads, the Padding, and the Pad Length a multiple of the
+      block size, but the recipient MUST accept any length that results
+      in proper alignment.  This field is encrypted with the negotiated
+      cipher.
+
+   o  Integrity Checksum Data is the cryptographic checksum of the
+      entire message starting with the Fixed IKE Header through the Pad
+      Length.  The checksum MUST be computed over the encrypted message.
+      Its length is determined by the integrity algorithm negotiated.
+
+3.15.  Configuration Payload
+
+   The Configuration payload, denoted CP in this document, is used to
+   exchange configuration information between IKE peers.  The exchange
+   is for an IRAC to request an internal IP address from an IRAS and to
+   exchange other information of the sort that one would acquire with
+   Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) if the IRAC were directly
+   connected to a LAN.
+
+   The Configuration Payload is defined as follows:
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C| RESERVED    |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |   CFG Type    |                    RESERVED                   |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                   Configuration Attributes                    ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 22:  Configuration Payload Format
+
+   The payload type for the Configuration Payload is forty seven (47).
+
+   o  CFG Type (1 octet) - The type of exchange represented by the
+      Configuration Attributes.
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 96]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      CFG Type           Value
+      --------------------------
+      RESERVED           0
+      CFG_REQUEST        1
+      CFG_REPLY          2
+      CFG_SET            3
+      CFG_ACK            4
+      RESERVED TO IANA   5-127
+      PRIVATE USE        128-255
+
+   o  RESERVED (3 octets) - MUST be sent as zero; MUST be ignored on
+      receipt.
+
+   o  Configuration Attributes (variable length) - These are type length
+      values specific to the Configuration Payload and are defined
+      below.  There may be zero or more Configuration Attributes in this
+      payload.
+
+3.15.1.  Configuration Attributes
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |R|         Attribute Type      |            Length             |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                             Value                             ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+            Figure 23:  Configuration Attribute Format
+
+   o  Reserved (1 bit) - This bit MUST be set to zero and MUST be
+      ignored on receipt.
+
+   o  Attribute Type (15 bits) - A unique identifier for each of the
+      Configuration Attribute Types.
+
+   o  Length (2 octets) - Length in octets of Value.
+
+   o  Value (0 or more octets) - The variable-length value of this
+      Configuration Attribute.  The following attribute types have been
+      defined:
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 97]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+                                      Multi-
+      Attribute Type           Value  Valued  Length
+      -------------------------------------------------------
+      RESERVED                 0
+      INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS     1      YES*    0 or 4 octets
+      INTERNAL_IP4_NETMASK     2      NO      0 or 4 octets
+      INTERNAL_IP4_DNS         3      YES     0 or 4 octets
+      INTERNAL_IP4_NBNS        4      YES     0 or 4 octets
+      RESERVED                 5
+      INTERNAL_IP4_DHCP        6      YES     0 or 4 octets
+      APPLICATION_VERSION      7      NO      0 or more
+      INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS     8      YES*    0 or 17 octets
+      RESERVED                 9
+      INTERNAL_IP6_DNS         10     YES     0 or 16 octets
+      INTERNAL_IP6_NBNS        11     YES     0 or 16 octets
+      INTERNAL_IP6_DHCP        12     YES     0 or 16 octets
+      INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET      13     YES     0 or 8 octets
+      SUPPORTED_ATTRIBUTES     14     NO      Multiple of 2
+      INTERNAL_IP6_SUBNET      15     YES     17 octets
+      RESERVED TO IANA         16-16383
+      PRIVATE USE              16384-32767
+
+      * These attributes may be multi-valued on return only if
+        multiple values were requested.
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS, INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS - An address on the
+      internal network, sometimes called a red node address or private
+      address and MAY be a private address on the Internet. {{
+      Clarif-6.2}} In a request message, the address specified is a
+      requested address (or a zero-length address if no specific address
+      is requested).  If a specific address is requested, it likely
+      indicates that a previous connection existed with this address and
+      the requestor would like to reuse that address.  With IPv6, a
+      requestor MAY supply the low-order address octets it wants to use.
+      Multiple internal addresses MAY be requested by requesting
+      multiple internal address attributes.  The responder MAY only send
+      up to the number of addresses requested.  The INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS
+      is made up of two fields: the first is a 16-octet IPv6 address,
+      and the second is a one-octet prefix-length as defined in
+      [ADDRIPV6].  The requested address is valid until there are no IKE
+      SAs between the peers.  This is described in more detail in
+      Section 3.15.3.
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP4_NETMASK - The internal network's netmask.  Only one
+      netmask is allowed in the request and reply messages (e.g.,
+      255.255.255.0), and it MUST be used only with an
+      INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS attribute. {{ Clarif-6.4 }}
+      INTERNAL_IP4_NETMASK in a CFG_REPLY means roughly the same thing
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 98]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+      as INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET containing the same information ("send
+      traffic to these addresses through me"), but also implies a link
+      boundary.  For instance, the client could use its own address and
+      the netmask to calculate the broadcast address of the link.  An
+      empty INTERNAL_IP4_NETMASK attribute can be included in a
+      CFG_REQUEST to request this information (although the gateway can
+      send the information even when not requested).  Non-empty values
+      for this attribute in a CFG_REQUEST do not make sense and thus
+      MUST NOT be included.
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP4_DNS, INTERNAL_IP6_DNS - Specifies an address of a DNS
+      server within the network.  Multiple DNS servers MAY be requested.
+      The responder MAY respond with zero or more DNS server attributes.
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP4_NBNS - Specifies an address of a NetBios Name Server
+      (WINS) within the network.  Multiple NBNS servers MAY be
+      requested.  The responder MAY respond with zero or more NBNS
+      server attributes.
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP6_NBNS - {{ Clarif-6.6 }} NetBIOS is not defined for
+      IPv6; therefore, INTERNAL_IP6_NBNS is also unspecified and is only
+      retained for compatibility with RFC 4306.
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP4_DHCP, INTERNAL_IP6_DHCP - Instructs the host to send
+      any internal DHCP requests to the address contained within the
+      attribute.  Multiple DHCP servers MAY be requested.  The responder
+      MAY respond with zero or more DHCP server attributes.
+
+   o  APPLICATION_VERSION - The version or application information of
+      the IPsec host.  This is a string of printable ASCII characters
+      that is NOT null terminated.
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET - The protected sub-networks that this edge-
+      device protects.  This attribute is made up of two fields: the
+      first being an IP address and the second being a netmask.
+      Multiple sub-networks MAY be requested.  The responder MAY respond
+      with zero or more sub-network attributes.  This is discussed in
+      more detail in Section 3.15.2.
+
+   o  SUPPORTED_ATTRIBUTES - When used within a Request, this attribute
+      MUST be zero-length and specifies a query to the responder to
+      reply back with all of the attributes that it supports.  The
+      response contains an attribute that contains a set of attribute
+      identifiers each in 2 octets.  The length divided by 2 (octets)
+      would state the number of supported attributes contained in the
+      response.
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                 [Page 99]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  INTERNAL_IP6_SUBNET - The protected sub-networks that this edge-
+      device protects.  This attribute is made up of two fields: the
+      first is a 16-octet IPv6 address, and the second is a one-octet
+      prefix-length as defined in [ADDRIPV6].  Multiple sub-networks MAY
+      be requested.  The responder MAY respond with zero or more sub-
+      network attributes.  This is discussed in more detail in Section
+      3.15.2.
+
+   Note that no recommendations are made in this document as to how an
+   implementation actually figures out what information to send in a
+   reply.  That is, we do not recommend any specific method of an IRAS
+   determining which DNS server should be returned to a requesting IRAC.
+
+3.15.2.  Meaning of INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET/INTERNAL_IP6_SUBNET
+
+   {{ Section added based on Clarif-6.3 }}
+
+   INTERNAL_IP4/6_SUBNET attributes can indicate additional subnets,
+   ones that need one or more separate SAs, that can be reached through
+   the gateway that announces the attributes.  INTERNAL_IP4/6_SUBNET
+   attributes may also express the gateway's policy about what traffic
+   should be sent through the gateway; the client can choose whether
+   other traffic (covered by TSr, but not in INTERNAL_IP4/6_SUBNET) is
+   sent through the gateway or directly to the destination.  Thus,
+   traffic to the addresses listed in the INTERNAL_IP4/6_SUBNET
+   attributes should be sent through the gateway that announces the
+   attributes.  If there are no existing IPsec SAs whose traffic
+   selectors cover the address in question, new SAs need to be created.
+
+   For instance, if there are two subnets, 192.0.1.0/26 and
+   192.0.2.0/24, and the client's request contains the following:
+
+   CP(CFG_REQUEST) =
+     INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS()
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535, 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255)
+
+   then a valid response could be the following (in which TSr and
+   INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET contain the same information):
+
+   CP(CFG_REPLY) =
+     INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS(192.0.1.234)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.1.0/255.255.255.192)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.2.0/255.255.255.0)
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, 192.0.1.234-192.0.1.234)
+   TSr = ((0, 0-65535, 192.0.1.0-192.0.1.63),
+          (0, 0-65535, 192.0.2.0-192.0.2.255))
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 100]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   In these cases, the INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET does not really carry any
+   useful information.
+
+   A different possible reply would have been this:
+
+   CP(CFG_REPLY) =
+     INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS(192.0.1.234)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.1.0/255.255.255.192)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.2.0/255.255.255.0)
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, 192.0.1.234-192.0.1.234)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535, 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255)
+
+   That reply would mean that the client can send all its traffic
+   through the gateway, but the gateway does not mind if the client
+   sends traffic not included by INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET directly to the
+   destination (without going through the gateway).
+
+   A different situation arises if the gateway has a policy that
+   requires the traffic for the two subnets to be carried in separate
+   SAs.  Then a response like this would indicate to the client that if
+   it wants access to the second subnet, it needs to create a separate
+   SA:
+
+   CP(CFG_REPLY) =
+     INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS(192.0.1.234)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.1.0/255.255.255.192)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.2.0/255.255.255.0)
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, 192.0.1.234-192.0.1.234)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535, 192.0.1.0-192.0.1.63)
+
+   INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET can also be useful if the client's TSr included
+   only part of the address space.  For instance, if the client requests
+   the following:
+
+   CP(CFG_REQUEST) =
+     INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS()
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535, 192.0.2.155-192.0.2.155)
+
+   then the gateway's reply might be:
+
+   CP(CFG_REPLY) =
+     INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS(192.0.1.234)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.1.0/255.255.255.192)
+     INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET(192.0.2.0/255.255.255.0)
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, 192.0.1.234-192.0.1.234)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535, 192.0.2.155-192.0.2.155)
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 101]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Because the meaning of INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET/INTERNAL_IP6_SUBNET is in
+   CFG_REQUESTs is unclear, they cannot be used reliably in
+   CFG_REQUESTs.
+
+3.15.3.  Configuration payloads for IPv6
+
+   {{ Added this section from Clarif-6.5 }}
+
+   The configuration payloads for IPv6 are based on the corresponding
+   IPv4 payloads, and do not fully follow the "normal IPv6 way of doing
+   things".  In particular, IPv6 stateless autoconfiguration or router
+   advertisement messages are not used; neither is neighbor discovery.
+
+   A client can be assigned an IPv6 address using the
+   INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS configuration payload.  A minimal exchange might
+   look like this:
+
+   CP(CFG_REQUEST) =
+     INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS()
+     INTERNAL_IP6_DNS()
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, :: - FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535, :: - FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF)
+
+   CP(CFG_REPLY) =
+     INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS(2001:DB8:0:1:2:3:4:5/64)
+     INTERNAL_IP6_DNS(2001:DB8:99:88:77:66:55:44)
+   TSi = (0, 0-65535, 2001:DB8:0:1:2:3:4:5 - 2001:DB8:0:1:2:3:4:5)
+   TSr = (0, 0-65535, :: - FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF)
+
+   The client MAY send a non-empty INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS attribute in the
+   CFG_REQUEST to request a specific address or interface identifier.
+   The gateway first checks if the specified address is acceptable, and
+   if it is, returns that one.  If the address was not acceptable, the
+   gateway attempts to use the interface identifier with some other
+   prefix; if even that fails, the gateway selects another interface
+   identifier.
+
+   The INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS attribute also contains a prefix length
+   field.  When used in a CFG_REPLY, this corresponds to the
+   INTERNAL_IP4_NETMASK attribute in the IPv4 case.
+
+   Although this approach to configuring IPv6 addresses is reasonably
+   simple, it has some limitations.  IPsec tunnels configured using
+   IKEv2 are not fully-featured "interfaces" in the IPv6 addressing
+   architecture sense [IPV6ADDR].  In particular, they do not
+   necessarily have link-local addresses, and this may complicate the
+   use of protocols that assume them, such as [MLDV2].
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 102]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+3.15.4.  Address Assignment Failures
+
+   {{ Added this section from Clarif-6.8 }}
+
+   If the responder encounters an error while attempting to assign an IP
+   address to the initiator during the processing of a Configuration
+   Payload, it responds with an INTERNAL_ADDRESS_FAILURE notification.
+   The IKE SA is still created even if the initial Child SA cannot be
+   created because of this failure. {{ 3.10.1-36 }} If this error is
+   generated within an IKE_AUTH exchange, no Child SA will be created.
+   However, there are some more complex error cases.
+
+   If the responder does not support configuration payloads at all, it
+   can simply ignore all configuration payloads.  This type of
+   implementation never sends INTERNAL_ADDRESS_FAILURE notifications.
+   If the initiator requires the assignment of an IP address, it will
+   treat a response without CFG_REPLY as an error.
+
+   The initiator may request a particular type of address (IPv4 or IPv6)
+   that the responder does not support, even though the responder
+   supports configuration payloads.  In this case, the responder simply
+   ignores the type of address it does not support and processes the
+   rest of the request as usual.
+
+   If the initiator requests multiple addresses of a type that the
+   responder supports, and some (but not all) of the requests fail, the
+   responder replies with the successful addresses only.  The responder
+   sends INTERNAL_ADDRESS_FAILURE only if no addresses can be assigned.
+
+3.16.  Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) Payload
+
+   The Extensible Authentication Protocol Payload, denoted EAP in this
+   memo, allows IKE SAs to be authenticated using the protocol defined
+   in RFC 3748 [EAP] and subsequent extensions to that protocol.  The
+   full set of acceptable values for the payload is defined elsewhere,
+   but a short summary of RFC 3748 is included here to make this
+   document stand alone in the common cases.
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   | Next Payload  |C|  RESERVED   |         Payload Length        |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |                                                               |
+   ~                       EAP Message                             ~
+   |                                                               |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 103]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+                   Figure 24:  EAP Payload Format
+
+   The payload type for an EAP Payload is forty eight (48).
+
+                        1                   2                   3
+    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |     Code      | Identifier    |           Length              |
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
+   |     Type      | Type_Data...
+   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-
+
+                   Figure 25:  EAP Message Format
+
+   o  Code (1 octet) indicates whether this message is a Request (1),
+      Response (2), Success (3), or Failure (4).
+
+   o  Identifier (1 octet) is used in PPP to distinguish replayed
+      messages from repeated ones.  Since in IKE, EAP runs over a
+      reliable protocol, it serves no function here.  In a response
+      message, this octet MUST be set to match the identifier in the
+      corresponding request.  In other messages, this field MAY be set
+      to any value.
+
+   o  Length (2 octets) is the length of the EAP message and MUST be
+      four less than the Payload Length of the encapsulating payload.
+
+   o  Type (1 octet) is present only if the Code field is Request (1) or
+      Response (2).  For other codes, the EAP message length MUST be
+      four octets and the Type and Type_Data fields MUST NOT be present.
+      In a Request (1) message, Type indicates the data being requested.
+      In a Response (2) message, Type MUST either be Nak or match the
+      type of the data requested.  The following types are defined in
+      RFC 3748:
+
+      1  Identity
+      2  Notification
+      3  Nak (Response Only)
+      4  MD5-Challenge
+      5  One-Time Password (OTP)
+      6  Generic Token Card
+
+   o  Type_Data (Variable Length) varies with the Type of Request and
+      the associated Response.  For the documentation of the EAP
+      methods, see [EAP].
+
+   {{ Demoted the SHOULD NOT and SHOULD }} Note that since IKE passes an
+   indication of initiator identity in message 3 of the protocol, the
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 104]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   responder should not send EAP Identity requests.  The initiator may,
+   however, respond to such requests if it receives them.
+
+
+4.  Conformance Requirements
+
+   In order to assure that all implementations of IKEv2 can
+   interoperate, there are "MUST support" requirements in addition to
+   those listed elsewhere.  Of course, IKEv2 is a security protocol, and
+   one of its major functions is to allow only authorized parties to
+   successfully complete establishment of SAs.  So a particular
+   implementation may be configured with any of a number of restrictions
+   concerning algorithms and trusted authorities that will prevent
+   universal interoperability.
+
+   IKEv2 is designed to permit minimal implementations that can
+   interoperate with all compliant implementations.  There are a series
+   of optional features that can easily be ignored by a particular
+   implementation if it does not support that feature.  Those features
+   include:
+
+   o  Ability to negotiate SAs through a NAT and tunnel the resulting
+      ESP SA over UDP.
+
+   o  Ability to request (and respond to a request for) a temporary IP
+      address on the remote end of a tunnel.
+
+   o  Ability to support various types of legacy authentication.
+
+   o  Ability to support window sizes greater than one.
+
+   o  Ability to establish multiple ESP or AH SAs within a single IKE
+      SA.
+
+   o  Ability to rekey SAs.
+
+   To assure interoperability, all implementations MUST be capable of
+   parsing all payload types (if only to skip over them) and to ignore
+   payload types that it does not support unless the critical bit is set
+   in the payload header.  If the critical bit is set in an unsupported
+   payload header, all implementations MUST reject the messages
+   containing those payloads.
+
+   Every implementation MUST be capable of doing four-message
+   IKE_SA_INIT and IKE_AUTH exchanges establishing two SAs (one for IKE,
+   one for ESP or AH).  Implementations MAY be initiate-only or respond-
+   only if appropriate for their platform.  Every implementation MUST be
+   capable of responding to an INFORMATIONAL exchange, but a minimal
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 105]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   implementation MAY respond to any INFORMATIONAL message with an empty
+   INFORMATIONAL reply (note that within the context of an IKE SA, an
+   "empty" message consists of an IKE header followed by an Encrypted
+   payload with no payloads contained in it).  A minimal implementation
+   MAY support the CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange only in so far as to
+   recognize requests and reject them with a Notify payload of type
+   NO_ADDITIONAL_SAS.  A minimal implementation need not be able to
+   initiate CREATE_CHILD_SA or INFORMATIONAL exchanges.  When an SA
+   expires (based on locally configured values of either lifetime or
+   octets passed), and implementation MAY either try to renew it with a
+   CREATE_CHILD_SA exchange or it MAY delete (close) the old SA and
+   create a new one.  If the responder rejects the CREATE_CHILD_SA
+   request with a NO_ADDITIONAL_SAS notification, the implementation
+   MUST be capable of instead deleting the old SA and creating a new
+   one.
+
+   Implementations are not required to support requesting temporary IP
+   addresses or responding to such requests.  If an implementation does
+   support issuing such requests, it MUST include a CP payload in
+   message 3 containing at least a field of type INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS or
+   INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS.  All other fields are optional.  If an
+   implementation supports responding to such requests, it MUST parse
+   the CP payload of type CFG_REQUEST in message 3 and recognize a field
+   of type INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS or INTERNAL_IP6_ADDRESS.  If it supports
+   leasing an address of the appropriate type, it MUST return a CP
+   payload of type CFG_REPLY containing an address of the requested
+   type. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} The responder may include any other
+   related attributes.
+
+   A minimal IPv4 responder implementation will ignore the contents of
+   the CP payload except to determine that it includes an
+   INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS attribute and will respond with the address and
+   other related attributes regardless of whether the initiator
+   requested them.
+
+   A minimal IPv4 initiator will generate a CP payload containing only
+   an INTERNAL_IP4_ADDRESS attribute and will parse the response
+   ignoring attributes it does not know how to use.
+
+   For an implementation to be called conforming to this specification,
+   it MUST be possible to configure it to accept the following:
+
+   o  PKIX Certificates containing and signed by RSA keys of size 1024
+      or 2048 bits, where the ID passed is any of ID_KEY_ID, ID_FQDN,
+      ID_RFC822_ADDR, or ID_DER_ASN1_DN.
+
+   o  Shared key authentication where the ID passed is any of ID_KEY_ID,
+      ID_FQDN, or ID_RFC822_ADDR.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 106]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   o  Authentication where the responder is authenticated using PKIX
+      Certificates and the initiator is authenticated using shared key
+      authentication.
+
+
+5.  Security Considerations
+
+   While this protocol is designed to minimize disclosure of
+   configuration information to unauthenticated peers, some such
+   disclosure is unavoidable.  One peer or the other must identify
+   itself first and prove its identity first.  To avoid probing, the
+   initiator of an exchange is required to identify itself first, and
+   usually is required to authenticate itself first.  The initiator can,
+   however, learn that the responder supports IKE and what cryptographic
+   protocols it supports.  The responder (or someone impersonating the
+   responder) can probe the initiator not only for its identity, but
+   using CERTREQ payloads may be able to determine what certificates the
+   initiator is willing to use.
+
+   Use of EAP authentication changes the probing possibilities somewhat.
+   When EAP authentication is used, the responder proves its identity
+   before the initiator does, so an initiator that knew the name of a
+   valid initiator could probe the responder for both its name and
+   certificates.
+
+   Repeated rekeying using CREATE_CHILD_SA without additional Diffie-
+   Hellman exchanges leaves all SAs vulnerable to cryptanalysis of a
+   single key or overrun of either endpoint.  Implementers should take
+   note of this fact and set a limit on CREATE_CHILD_SA exchanges
+   between exponentiations.  This memo does not prescribe such a limit.
+
+   The strength of a key derived from a Diffie-Hellman exchange using
+   any of the groups defined here depends on the inherent strength of
+   the group, the size of the exponent used, and the entropy provided by
+   the random number generator used.  Due to these inputs, it is
+   difficult to determine the strength of a key for any of the defined
+   groups.  Diffie-Hellman group number two, when used with a strong
+   random number generator and an exponent no less than 200 bits, is
+   common for use with 3DES.  Group five provides greater security than
+   group two.  Group one is for historic purposes only and does not
+   provide sufficient strength except for use with DES, which is also
+   for historic use only.  Implementations should make note of these
+   estimates when establishing policy and negotiating security
+   parameters.
+
+   Note that these limitations are on the Diffie-Hellman groups
+   themselves.  There is nothing in IKE that prohibits using stronger
+   groups nor is there anything that will dilute the strength obtained
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 107]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   from stronger groups (limited by the strength of the other algorithms
+   negotiated including the prf function).  In fact, the extensible
+   framework of IKE encourages the definition of more groups; use of
+   elliptical curve groups may greatly increase strength using much
+   smaller numbers.
+
+   It is assumed that all Diffie-Hellman exponents are erased from
+   memory after use.
+
+   The strength of all keys is limited by the size of the output of the
+   negotiated prf function.  For this reason, a prf function whose
+   output is less than 128 bits (e.g., 3DES-CBC) MUST NOT be used with
+   this protocol.
+
+   The security of this protocol is critically dependent on the
+   randomness of the randomly chosen parameters.  These should be
+   generated by a strong random or properly seeded pseudo-random source
+   (see [RANDOMNESS]).  Implementers should take care to ensure that use
+   of random numbers for both keys and nonces is engineered in a fashion
+   that does not undermine the security of the keys.
+
+   For information on the rationale of many of the cryptographic design
+   choices in this protocol, see [SIGMA] and [SKEME].  Though the
+   security of negotiated Child SAs does not depend on the strength of
+   the encryption and integrity protection negotiated in the IKE SA,
+   implementations MUST NOT negotiate NONE as the IKE integrity
+   protection algorithm or ENCR_NULL as the IKE encryption algorithm.
+
+   When using pre-shared keys, a critical consideration is how to assure
+   the randomness of these secrets.  The strongest practice is to ensure
+   that any pre-shared key contain as much randomness as the strongest
+   key being negotiated.  Deriving a shared secret from a password,
+   name, or other low-entropy source is not secure.  These sources are
+   subject to dictionary and social engineering attacks, among others.
+
+   The NAT_DETECTION_*_IP notifications contain a hash of the addresses
+   and ports in an attempt to hide internal IP addresses behind a NAT.
+   Since the IPv4 address space is only 32 bits, and it is usually very
+   sparse, it would be possible for an attacker to find out the internal
+   address used behind the NAT box by trying all possible IP addresses
+   and trying to find the matching hash.  The port numbers are normally
+   fixed to 500, and the SPIs can be extracted from the packet.  This
+   reduces the number of hash calculations to 2^32.  With an educated
+   guess of the use of private address space, the number of hash
+   calculations is much smaller.  Designers should therefore not assume
+   that use of IKE will not leak internal address information.
+
+   When using an EAP authentication method that does not generate a
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 108]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   shared key for protecting a subsequent AUTH payload, certain man-in-
+   the-middle and server impersonation attacks are possible [EAPMITM].
+   These vulnerabilities occur when EAP is also used in protocols that
+   are not protected with a secure tunnel.  Since EAP is a general-
+   purpose authentication protocol, which is often used to provide
+   single-signon facilities, a deployed IPsec solution that relies on an
+   EAP authentication method that does not generate a shared key (also
+   known as a non-key-generating EAP method) can become compromised due
+   to the deployment of an entirely unrelated application that also
+   happens to use the same non-key-generating EAP method, but in an
+   unprotected fashion.  Note that this vulnerability is not limited to
+   just EAP, but can occur in other scenarios where an authentication
+   infrastructure is reused.  For example, if the EAP mechanism used by
+   IKEv2 utilizes a token authenticator, a man-in-the-middle attacker
+   could impersonate the web server, intercept the token authentication
+   exchange, and use it to initiate an IKEv2 connection.  For this
+   reason, use of non-key-generating EAP methods SHOULD be avoided where
+   possible.  Where they are used, it is extremely important that all
+   usages of these EAP methods SHOULD utilize a protected tunnel, where
+   the initiator validates the responder's certificate before initiating
+   the EAP authentication. {{ Demoted the SHOULD }} Implementers should
+   describe the vulnerabilities of using non-key-generating EAP methods
+   in the documentation of their implementations so that the
+   administrators deploying IPsec solutions are aware of these dangers.
+
+   An implementation using EAP MUST also use strong authentication of
+   the server to the client before the EAP authentication begins, even
+   if the EAP method offers mutual authentication.  This avoids having
+   additional IKEv2 protocol variations and protects the EAP data from
+   active attackers.
+
+   If the messages of IKEv2 are long enough that IP-level fragmentation
+   is necessary, it is possible that attackers could prevent the
+   exchange from completing by exhausting the reassembly buffers.  The
+   chances of this can be minimized by using the Hash and URL encodings
+   instead of sending certificates (see Section 3.6).  Additional
+   mitigations are discussed in [DOSUDPPROT].
+
+5.1.  Traffic selector authorization
+
+   {{ Added this section from Clarif-4.13 }}
+
+   IKEv2 relies on information in the Peer Authorization Database (PAD)
+   when determining what kind of IPsec SAs a peer is allowed to create.
+   This process is described in [IPSECARCH] Section 4.4.3.  When a peer
+   requests the creation of an IPsec SA with some traffic selectors, the
+   PAD must contain "Child SA Authorization Data" linking the identity
+   authenticated by IKEv2 and the addresses permitted for traffic
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 109]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   selectors.
+
+   For example, the PAD might be configured so that authenticated
+   identity "sgw23.example.com" is allowed to create IPsec SAs for
+   192.0.2.0/24, meaning this security gateway is a valid
+   "representative" for these addresses.  Host-to-host IPsec requires
+   similar entries, linking, for example, "fooserver4.example.com" with
+   192.0.1.66/32, meaning this identity a valid "owner" or
+   "representative" of the address in question.
+
+   As noted in [IPSECARCH], "It is necessary to impose these constraints
+   on creation of child SAs to prevent an authenticated peer from
+   spoofing IDs associated with other, legitimate peers."  In the
+   example given above, a correct configuration of the PAD prevents
+   sgw23 from creating IPsec SAs with address 192.0.1.66, and prevents
+   fooserver4 from creating IPsec SAs with addresses from 192.0.2.0/24.
+
+   It is important to note that simply sending IKEv2 packets using some
+   particular address does not imply a permission to create IPsec SAs
+   with that address in the traffic selectors.  For example, even if
+   sgw23 would be able to spoof its IP address as 192.0.1.66, it could
+   not create IPsec SAs matching fooserver4's traffic.
+
+   The IKEv2 specification does not specify how exactly IP address
+   assignment using configuration payloads interacts with the PAD.  Our
+   interpretation is that when a security gateway assigns an address
+   using configuration payloads, it also creates a temporary PAD entry
+   linking the authenticated peer identity and the newly allocated inner
+   address.
+
+   It has been recognized that configuring the PAD correctly may be
+   difficult in some environments.  For instance, if IPsec is used
+   between a pair of hosts whose addresses are allocated dynamically
+   using DHCP, it is extremely difficult to ensure that the PAD
+   specifies the correct "owner" for each IP address.  This would
+   require a mechanism to securely convey address assignments from the
+   DHCP server, and link them to identities authenticated using IKEv2.
+
+   Due to this limitation, some vendors have been known to configure
+   their PADs to allow an authenticated peer to create IPsec SAs with
+   traffic selectors containing the same address that was used for the
+   IKEv2 packets.  In environments where IP spoofing is possible (i.e.,
+   almost everywhere) this essentially allows any peer to create IPsec
+   SAs with any traffic selectors.  This is not an appropriate or secure
+   configuration in most circumstances.  See [H2HIPSEC] for an extensive
+   discussion about this issue, and the limitations of host-to-host
+   IPsec in general.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 110]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+6.  IANA Considerations
+
+   {{ This section was changed to not re-define any new IANA registries.
+   }}
+
+   [IKEV2] defined many field types and values.  IANA has already
+   registered those types and values, so the are not listed here again.
+   No new types or values are registered in this document.  However,
+   IANA should update all references to RFC 4306 to point to this
+   document.
+
+
+7.  Acknowledgements
+
+   The individuals on the IPsec mailing list was very helpful in both
+   pointing out where clarifications and changes were needed, as well as
+   in reviewing the clarifications suggested by others.
+
+   The acknowledgements from the IKEv2 document were:
+
+   This document is a collaborative effort of the entire IPsec WG.  If
+   there were no limit to the number of authors that could appear on an
+   RFC, the following, in alphabetical order, would have been listed:
+   Bill Aiello, Stephane Beaulieu, Steve Bellovin, Sara Bitan, Matt
+   Blaze, Ran Canetti, Darren Dukes, Dan Harkins, Paul Hoffman, John
+   Ioannidis, Charlie Kaufman, Steve Kent, Angelos Keromytis, Tero
+   Kivinen, Hugo Krawczyk, Andrew Krywaniuk, Radia Perlman, Omer
+   Reingold, and Michael Richardson.  Many other people contributed to
+   the design.  It is an evolution of IKEv1, ISAKMP, and the IPsec DOI,
+   each of which has its own list of authors.  Hugh Daniel suggested the
+   feature of having the initiator, in message 3, specify a name for the
+   responder, and gave the feature the cute name "You Tarzan, Me Jane".
+   David Faucher and Valery Smyzlov helped refine the design of the
+   traffic selector negotiation.
+
+   This paragraph lists references that appear only in figures.  The
+   section is only here to keep the 'xml2rfc' program happy, and needs
+   to be removed when the document is published.  The RFC Editor will
+   remove it before publication.  [AEAD] [EAI] [DES] [IDEA] [MD5]
+   [X.501] [X.509]
+
+
+8.  References
+
+8.1.  Normative References
+
+   [ADDGROUP]
+              Kivinen, T. and M. Kojo, "More Modular Exponential (MODP)
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 111]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+              Diffie-Hellman groups for Internet Key Exchange (IKE)",
+              RFC 3526, May 2003.
+
+   [ADDRIPV6]
+              Hinden, R. and S. Deering, "Internet Protocol Version 6
+              (IPv6) Addressing Architecture", RFC 4291, February 2006.
+
+   [EAP]      Aboba, B., Blunk, L., Vollbrecht, J., Carlson, J., and H.
+              Levkowetz, "Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)",
+              RFC 3748, June 2004.
+
+   [ECN]      Ramakrishnan, K., Floyd, S., and D. Black, "The Addition
+              of Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) to IP",
+              RFC 3168, September 2001.
+
+   [ESPCBC]   Pereira, R. and R. Adams, "The ESP CBC-Mode Cipher
+              Algorithms", RFC 2451, November 1998.
+
+   [IPSECARCH]
+              Kent, S. and K. Seo, "Security Architecture for the
+              Internet Protocol", RFC 4301, December 2005.
+
+   [MUSTSHOULD]
+              Bradner, S., "Key Words for use in RFCs to indicate
+              Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
+
+   [PKCS1]    Jonsson, J. and B. Kaliski, "Public-Key Cryptography
+              Standards (PKCS) #1: RSA Cryptography Specifications
+              Version 2.1", RFC 3447, February 2003.
+
+   [PKIX]     Housley, R., Polk, W., Ford, W., and D. Solo, "Internet
+              X.509 Public Key Infrastructure Certificate and
+              Certificate Revocation List (CRL) Profile", RFC 3280,
+              April 2002.
+
+   [RFC4434]  Hoffman, P., "The AES-XCBC-PRF-128 Algorithm for the
+              Internet Key Exchange Protocol (IKE)", RFC 4434,
+              February 2006.
+
+   [RFC4615]  Song, J., Poovendran, R., Lee, J., and T. Iwata, "The
+              Advanced Encryption Standard-Cipher-based Message
+              Authentication Code-Pseudo-Random Function-128 (AES-CMAC-
+              PRF-128) Algorithm for the Internet Key Exchange Protocol
+              (IKE)", RFC 4615, August 2006.
+
+   [UDPENCAPS]
+              Huttunen, A., Swander, B., Volpe, V., DiBurro, L., and M.
+              Stenberg, "UDP Encapsulation of IPsec ESP Packets",
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 112]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+              RFC 3948, January 2005.
+
+8.2.  Informative References
+
+   [AEAD]     McGrew, D., "An Interface and Algorithms for Authenticated
+              Encryption", RFC 5116, January 2008.
+
+   [AH]       Kent, S., "IP Authentication Header", RFC 4302,
+              December 2005.
+
+   [ARCHGUIDEPHIL]
+              Bush, R. and D. Meyer, "Some Internet Architectural
+              Guidelines and Philosophy", RFC 3439, December 2002.
+
+   [ARCHPRINC]
+              Carpenter, B., "Architectural Principles of the Internet",
+              RFC 1958, June 1996.
+
+   [Clarif]   Eronen, P. and P. Hoffman, "IKEv2 Clarifications and
+              Implementation Guidelines", RFC 4718, October 2006.
+
+   [DES]      American National Standards Institute, "American National
+              Standard for Information Systems-Data Link Encryption",
+              ANSI X3.106, 1983.
+
+   [DH]       Diffie, W. and M. Hellman, "New Directions in
+              Cryptography", IEEE Transactions on Information Theory,
+              V.IT-22 n. 6, June 1977.
+
+   [DHCP]     Droms, R., "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol",
+              RFC 2131, March 1997.
+
+   [DIFFSERVARCH]
+              Blake, S., Black, D., Carlson, M., Davies, E., Wang, Z.,
+              and W. Weiss, "An Architecture for Differentiated
+              Services", RFC 2475.
+
+   [DIFFSERVFIELD]
+              Nichols, K., Blake, S., Baker, F., and D. Black,
+              "Definition of the Differentiated Services Field (DS
+              Field) in the IPv4 and IPv6 Headers", RFC 2474,
+              December 1998.
+
+   [DIFFTUNNEL]
+              Black, D., "Differentiated Services and Tunnels",
+              RFC 2983, October 2000.
+
+   [DOI]      Piper, D., "The Internet IP Security Domain of
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 113]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+              Interpretation for ISAKMP", RFC 2407, November 1998.
+
+   [DOSUDPPROT]
+              C. Kaufman, R. Perlman, and B. Sommerfeld, "DoS protection
+              for UDP-based protocols", ACM Conference on Computer and
+              Communications Security , October 2003.
+
+   [DSS]      National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S.
+              Department of Commerce, "Digital Signature Standard",
+              Draft FIPS 186-3, June 2008.
+
+   [EAI]      Abel, Y., "Internationalized Email Headers", RFC 5335,
+              September 2008.
+
+   [EAPMITM]  N. Asokan, V. Nierni, and K. Nyberg, "Man-in-the-Middle in
+              Tunneled Authentication Protocols", November 2002,
+              <http://eprint.iacr.org/2002/163>.
+
+   [ESP]      Kent, S., "IP Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP)",
+              RFC 4303, December 2005.
+
+   [EXCHANGEANALYSIS]
+              R. Perlman and C. Kaufman, "Analysis of the IPsec key
+              exchange Standard", WET-ICE Security Conference, MIT ,
+              2001,
+              <http://sec.femto.org/wetice-2001/papers/radia-paper.pdf>.
+
+   [H2HIPSEC]
+              Aura, T., Roe, M., and A. Mohammed, "Experiences with
+              Host-to-Host IPsec", 13th International Workshop on
+              Security Protocols, Cambridge, UK, April 2005.
+
+   [HMAC]     Krawczyk, H., Bellare, M., and R. Canetti, "HMAC: Keyed-
+              Hashing for Message Authentication", RFC 2104,
+              February 1997.
+
+   [IDEA]     X. Lai, "On the Design and Security of Block Ciphers", ETH
+              Series in Information Processing, v. 1, Konstanz: Hartung-
+              Gorre Verlag, 1992.
+
+   [IDNA]     Faltstrom, P., Hoffman, P., and A. Costello,
+              "Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications (IDNA)",
+              RFC 3490, March 2003.
+
+   [IKEV1]    Harkins, D. and D. Carrel, "The Internet Key Exchange
+              (IKE)", RFC 2409, November 1998.
+
+   [IKEV2]    Kaufman, C., "Internet Key Exchange (IKEv2) Protocol",
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 114]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+              RFC 4306, December 2005.
+
+   [IP-COMP]  Shacham, A., Monsour, B., Pereira, R., and M. Thomas, "IP
+              Payload Compression Protocol (IPComp)", RFC 3173,
+              September 2001.
+
+   [IPSECARCH-OLD]
+              Kent, S. and R. Atkinson, "Security Architecture for the
+              Internet Protocol", RFC 2401, November 1998.
+
+   [IPV6ADDR]
+              Hinden, R. and S. Deering, "Internet Protocol Version 6
+              (IPv6) Addressing Architecture", RFC 4291, February 2006.
+
+   [ISAKMP]   Maughan, D., Schneider, M., and M. Schertler, "Internet
+              Security Association and Key Management Protocol
+              (ISAKMP)", RFC 2408, November 1998.
+
+   [LDAP]     Sermersheim, J., "Lightweight Directory Access Protocol
+              (v3)", RFC 4511, June 2006.
+
+   [MAILFORMAT]
+              Resnick, P., "Internet Message Format", RFC 2822,
+              April 2001.
+
+   [MD5]      Rivest, R., "The MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm", RFC 1321,
+              April 1992.
+
+   [MIPV6]    Johnson, D., Perkins, C., and J. Arkko, "Mobility Support
+              in IPv6", RFC 3775, June 2004.
+
+   [MLDV2]    Vida, R. and L. Costa, "Multicast Listener Discovery
+              Version 2 (MLDv2) for IPv6", RFC 3810, June 2004.
+
+   [MODES]    National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S.
+              Department of Commerce, "Recommendation for Block Cipher
+              Modes of Operation", SP 800-38A, 2001.
+
+   [NAI]      Aboba, B., Beadles, M., Eronen, P., and J. Arkko, "The
+              Network Access Identifier", RFC 4282, December 2005.
+
+   [NATREQ]   Aboba, B. and W. Dixon, "IPsec-Network Address Translation
+              (NAT) Compatibility Requirements", RFC 3715, March 2004.
+
+   [OAKLEY]   Orman, H., "The OAKLEY Key Determination Protocol",
+              RFC 2412, November 1998.
+
+   [PFKEY]    McDonald, D., Metz, C., and B. Phan, "PF_KEY Key
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 115]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+              Management API, Version 2", RFC 2367, July 1998.
+
+   [PHOTURIS]
+              Karn, P. and W. Simpson, "Photuris: Session-Key Management
+              Protocol", RFC 2522, March 1999.
+
+   [RADIUS]   Rigney, C., Rubens, A., Simpson, W., and S. Willens,
+              "Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS)",
+              RFC 2138, April 1997.
+
+   [RANDOMNESS]
+              Eastlake, D., Schiller, J., and S. Crocker, "Randomness
+              Requirements for Security", BCP 106, RFC 4086, June 2005.
+
+   [REAUTH]   Nir, Y., "Repeated Authentication in Internet Key Exchange
+              (IKEv2) Protocol", RFC 4478, April 2006.
+
+   [ROHCV2]   Ertekin, et. al., E., "IKEv2 Extensions to Support Robust
+              Header Compression over IPsec (ROHCoIPsec)",
+              draft-ietf-rohc-ikev2-extensions-hcoipsec (work in
+              progress), October 2008.
+
+   [RSA]      R. Rivest, A. Shamir, and L. Adleman, "A Method for
+              Obtaining Digital Signatures and Public-Key
+              Cryptosystems", February 1978.
+
+   [SHA]      National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S.
+              Department of Commerce, "Secure Hash Standard",
+              FIPS 180-3, October 2008.
+
+   [SIGMA]    H. Krawczyk, "SIGMA: the `SIGn-and-MAc' Approach to
+              Authenticated Diffie-Hellman and its Use in the IKE
+              Protocols", Advances in Cryptography - CRYPTO 2003
+              Proceedings LNCS 2729, 2003, <http://
+              www.informatik.uni-trier.de/~ley/db/conf/crypto/
+              crypto2003.html>.
+
+   [SKEME]    H. Krawczyk, "SKEME: A Versatile Secure Key Exchange
+              Mechanism for Internet", IEEE Proceedings of the 1996
+              Symposium on Network and Distributed Systems Security ,
+              1996.
+
+   [TRANSPARENCY]
+              Carpenter, B., "Internet Transparency", RFC 2775,
+              February 2000.
+
+   [X.501]    ITU-T, "Recommendation X.501: Information Technology -
+              Open Systems Interconnection - The Directory: Models",
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 116]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+              1993.
+
+   [X.509]    ITU-T, "Recommendation X.509 (1997 E): Information
+              Technology - Open Systems Interconnection - The Directory:
+              Authentication Framework", 1997.
+
+
+Appendix A.  Summary of changes from IKEv1
+
+   The goals of this revision to IKE are:
+
+   1.   To define the entire IKE protocol in a single document,
+        replacing RFCs 2407, 2408, and 2409 and incorporating subsequent
+        changes to support NAT Traversal, Extensible Authentication, and
+        Remote Address acquisition;
+
+   2.   To simplify IKE by replacing the eight different initial
+        exchanges with a single four-message exchange (with changes in
+        authentication mechanisms affecting only a single AUTH payload
+        rather than restructuring the entire exchange) see
+        [EXCHANGEANALYSIS];
+
+   3.   To remove the Domain of Interpretation (DOI), Situation (SIT),
+        and Labeled Domain Identifier fields, and the Commit and
+        Authentication only bits;
+
+   4.   To decrease IKE's latency in the common case by making the
+        initial exchange be 2 round trips (4 messages), and allowing the
+        ability to piggyback setup of a Child SA on that exchange;
+
+   5.   To replace the cryptographic syntax for protecting the IKE
+        messages themselves with one based closely on ESP to simplify
+        implementation and security analysis;
+
+   6.   To reduce the number of possible error states by making the
+        protocol reliable (all messages are acknowledged) and sequenced.
+        This allows shortening CREATE_CHILD_SA exchanges from 3 messages
+        to 2;
+
+   7.   To increase robustness by allowing the responder to not do
+        significant processing until it receives a message proving that
+        the initiator can receive messages at its claimed IP address;
+
+   8.   To fix cryptographic weaknesses such as the problem with
+        symmetries in hashes used for authentication documented by Tero
+        Kivinen;
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 117]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   9.   To specify Traffic Selectors in their own payloads type rather
+        than overloading ID payloads, and making more flexible the
+        Traffic Selectors that may be specified;
+
+   10.  To specify required behavior under certain error conditions or
+        when data that is not understood is received in order to make it
+        easier to make future revisions in a way that does not break
+        backwards compatibility;
+
+   11.  To simplify and clarify how shared state is maintained in the
+        presence of network failures and Denial of Service attacks; and
+
+   12.  To maintain existing syntax and magic numbers to the extent
+        possible to make it likely that implementations of IKEv1 can be
+        enhanced to support IKEv2 with minimum effort.
+
+
+Appendix B.  Diffie-Hellman Groups
+
+   There are two Diffie-Hellman groups defined here for use in IKE.
+   These groups were generated by Richard Schroeppel at the University
+   of Arizona.  Properties of these primes are described in [OAKLEY].
+
+   The strength supplied by group one may not be sufficient for the
+   mandatory-to-implement encryption algorithm and is here for historic
+   reasons.
+
+   Additional Diffie-Hellman groups have been defined in [ADDGROUP].
+
+B.1.  Group 1 - 768 Bit MODP
+
+   This group is assigned id 1 (one).
+
+   The prime is: 2^768 - 2 ^704 - 1 + 2^64 * { [2^638 pi] + 149686 }
+   Its hexadecimal value is:
+
+   FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF C90FDAA2 2168C234 C4C6628B 80DC1CD1
+   29024E08 8A67CC74 020BBEA6 3B139B22 514A0879 8E3404DD
+   EF9519B3 CD3A431B 302B0A6D F25F1437 4FE1356D 6D51C245
+   E485B576 625E7EC6 F44C42E9 A63A3620 FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF
+
+   The generator is 2.
+
+B.2.  Group 2 - 1024 Bit MODP
+
+   This group is assigned id 2 (two).
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 118]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   The prime is 2^1024 - 2^960 - 1 + 2^64 * { [2^894 pi] + 129093 }.
+   Its hexadecimal value is:
+
+   FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF C90FDAA2 2168C234 C4C6628B 80DC1CD1
+   29024E08 8A67CC74 020BBEA6 3B139B22 514A0879 8E3404DD
+   EF9519B3 CD3A431B 302B0A6D F25F1437 4FE1356D 6D51C245
+   E485B576 625E7EC6 F44C42E9 A637ED6B 0BFF5CB6 F406B7ED
+   EE386BFB 5A899FA5 AE9F2411 7C4B1FE6 49286651 ECE65381
+   FFFFFFFF FFFFFFFF
+
+   The generator is 2.
+
+
+Appendix C.  Exchanges and Payloads
+
+   {{ Clarif-AppA }}
+
+   This appendix contains a short summary of the IKEv2 exchanges, and
+   what payloads can appear in which message.  This appendix is purely
+   informative; if it disagrees with the body of this document, the
+   other text is considered correct.
+
+   Vendor-ID (V) payloads may be included in any place in any message.
+   This sequence here shows what are the most logical places for them.
+
+C.1.  IKE_SA_INIT Exchange
+
+   request             --> [N(COOKIE)],
+                           SA, KE, Ni,
+                           [N(NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP)+,
+                            N(NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP)],
+                           [V+]
+
+   normal response     <-- SA, KE, Nr,
+   (no cookie)             [N(NAT_DETECTION_SOURCE_IP),
+                            N(NAT_DETECTION_DESTINATION_IP)],
+                           [[N(HTTP_CERT_LOOKUP_SUPPORTED)], CERTREQ+],
+                           [V+]
+
+   cookie response     <-- N(COOKIE),
+                           [V+]
+
+   different D-H       <-- N(INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD),
+   group wanted            [V+]
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 119]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+C.2.  IKE_AUTH Exchange without EAP
+
+   request             --> IDi, [CERT+],
+                           [N(INITIAL_CONTACT)],
+                           [[N(HTTP_CERT_LOOKUP_SUPPORTED)], CERTREQ+],
+                           [IDr],
+                           AUTH,
+                           [CP(CFG_REQUEST)],
+                           [N(IPCOMP_SUPPORTED)+],
+                           [N(USE_TRANSPORT_MODE)],
+                           [N(ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO)],
+                           SA, TSi, TSr,
+                           [V+]
+
+   response            <-- IDr, [CERT+],
+                           AUTH,
+                           [CP(CFG_REPLY)],
+                           [N(IPCOMP_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(USE_TRANSPORT_MODE)],
+                           [N(ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO)],
+                           SA, TSi, TSr,
+                           [N(ADDITIONAL_TS_POSSIBLE)],
+                           [V+]
+
+   error in Child SA  <--  IDr, [CERT+],
+   creation                AUTH,
+                           N(error),
+                           [V+]
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 120]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+C.3.  IKE_AUTH Exchange with EAP
+
+   first request       --> IDi,
+                           [N(INITIAL_CONTACT)],
+                           [[N(HTTP_CERT_LOOKUP_SUPPORTED)], CERTREQ+],
+                           [IDr],
+                           [CP(CFG_REQUEST)],
+                           [N(IPCOMP_SUPPORTED)+],
+                           [N(USE_TRANSPORT_MODE)],
+                           [N(ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO)],
+                           SA, TSi, TSr,
+                           [V+]
+
+   first response      <-- IDr, [CERT+], AUTH,
+                           EAP,
+                           [V+]
+
+                     / --> EAP
+   repeat 1..N times |
+                     \ <-- EAP
+
+   last request        --> AUTH
+
+   last response       <-- AUTH,
+                           [CP(CFG_REPLY)],
+                           [N(IPCOMP_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(USE_TRANSPORT_MODE)],
+                           [N(ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO)],
+                           SA, TSi, TSr,
+                           [N(ADDITIONAL_TS_POSSIBLE)],
+                           [V+]
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 121]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+C.4.  CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange for Creating or Rekeying Child SAs
+
+   request             --> [N(REKEY_SA)],
+                           [CP(CFG_REQUEST)],
+                           [N(IPCOMP_SUPPORTED)+],
+                           [N(USE_TRANSPORT_MODE)],
+                           [N(ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO)],
+                           SA, Ni, [KEi], TSi, TSr
+                           [V+]
+
+   normal              <-- [CP(CFG_REPLY)],
+   response                [N(IPCOMP_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(USE_TRANSPORT_MODE)],
+                           [N(ESP_TFC_PADDING_NOT_SUPPORTED)],
+                           [N(NON_FIRST_FRAGMENTS_ALSO)],
+                           SA, Nr, [KEr], TSi, TSr,
+                           [N(ADDITIONAL_TS_POSSIBLE)]
+                           [V+]
+
+   error case          <-- N(error)
+
+   different D-H       <-- N(INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD),
+   group wanted            [V+]
+
+C.5.  CREATE_CHILD_SA Exchange for Rekeying the IKE SA
+
+   request             --> SA, Ni, [KEi]
+                           [V+]
+
+   response            <-- SA, Nr, [KEr]
+                           [V+]
+
+C.6.  INFORMATIONAL Exchange
+
+   request             --> [N+],
+                           [D+],
+                           [CP(CFG_REQUEST)]
+
+   response            <-- [N+],
+                           [D+],
+                           [CP(CFG_REPLY)]
+
+
+Appendix D.  Changes Between Internet Draft Versions
+
+   This section will be removed before publication as an RFC, but should
+   be left intact until then so that reviewers can follow what has
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 122]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   changed.
+
+D.1.  Changes from IKEv2 to draft -00
+
+   There were a zillion additions from RFC 4718.  These are noted with
+   "{{ Clarif-nn }}".
+
+   Cleaned up many of the figures.  Made the table headings consistent.
+   Made some tables easier to read by removing blank spaces.  Removed
+   the "reserved to IANA" and "private use" text wording and moved it
+   into the tables.
+
+   Changed many SHOULD requirements to better match RFC 2119.  These are
+   also marked with comments such as "{{ Demoted the SHOULD }}".
+
+   In Section 2.16, changed the MUST requirement of authenticating the
+   responder from "public key signature based" to "strong" because that
+   is what most current IKEv2 implementations do, and it better matches
+   the actual security requirement.
+
+D.2.  Changes from draft -00 to draft -01
+
+   The most significant technical change was to make KE optional but
+   strongly recommended in Section 1.3.2.
+
+   Updated all references to the IKEv2 Clarifications document to RFC
+   4718.
+
+   Moved a lot of the protocol description out of the long tables in
+   Section 3.10.1 into the body of the document.  These are noted with
+   "{{ 3.10.1-nnnn }}", where "nnnn" is the notification type number.
+
+   Made some table changes based on suggestions from Alfred Hoenes.
+
+   Changed "byte" to "octet" in many places.
+
+   Removed discussion of ESP+AH bundles in many places, and added a
+   paragraph about it in Section 1.7.
+
+   Removed the discussion of INTERNAL_ADDRESS_EXPIRY in many places, and
+   added a paragraph about it in Section 1.7.
+
+   Moved Clarif-7.10 from Section 1.2 to Section 3.2.
+
+   In the figure in Section 1.3.2, made KEi optional, and added text
+   saying "The KEi payload SHOULD be included."
+
+   In the figure in Section 1.3.2, maked KEr optional, and removed text
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 123]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   saying "KEi and KEr are required for rekeying an IKE SA."
+
+   In Section 1.4, clarified that the half-closed connections being
+   discussed are AH and ESP.
+
+   Rearranged the end of Section 1.7, and added the new notation for
+   moving text out of 3.10.1.
+
+   Clarified the wording in the second paragraph of Section 2.2.  This
+   allowd the removal of the fourth paragraph, which previously had
+   Clarif-2.2 in it.
+
+   In section 2.5, removed "or later" from "version 2.0".
+
+   Added the question for implementers about payload order at the end of
+   Section 2.5.
+
+   Corrected Section 2.7 based on Clarif-7-13 to say that you can't do
+   ESP and AH at one time.
+
+   In Section 2.8, clarified the wording about how to replace an IKE SA.
+
+   Clarified the text in the last many paragraphs in Section 2.9.  Also
+   moved some text from near the beginning of 2.9 to the beginning of
+   2.9.1.
+
+   Removed some redundant text in Section 2.9 concerning creating a
+   Child SA pair not in response to an arriving packet.
+
+   Added the following to the end of the first paragraph of Section
+   2.14: "The lengths of SK_d, SK_pi, and SK_pr are the key length of
+   the agreed-to PRF."
+
+   Added the restriction in Section 2.15 that all PRFs used with IKEv2
+   MUST take variable-sized keys.
+
+   In Section 2.17, removed "If multiple IPsec protocols are negotiated,
+   keying material is taken in the order in which the protocol headers
+   will appear in the encapsulated packet" because multiple IPsec
+   protocols cannot be negotiated at one time.
+
+   Added the material from Clarif-5.12 to Section 2.18.
+
+   Changed "hash of" to "expected value of" in Section 2.23.
+
+   In the bulleted list in Section 2.23, replaced "this end" with a
+   clearer description of which system is being discussed.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 124]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Added the paragraph at the beginning of Section 3 about
+   interoperability and UNSPECIFIED values ("In the tables in this
+   section...").
+
+   Fixed Section 3.3 to not include proposal that include both AH and
+   ESP.  Ditto for the "Proposal #" bullet in Section 3.3.1.
+
+   In the description of ID_FQDN in Section 3.5, added "All characters
+   in the ID_FQDN are ASCII; this follows that for an "internationalized
+   domain name" as defined in [IDNA]."
+
+   In Section 3.8, shortened and clarified the description of "RSA
+   Digital Signature".
+
+   In Section 3.10, shortened and clarified the description of "Protocol
+   ID".
+
+   In Section 3.15, "The requested address is valid until the expiry
+   time defined with the INTERNAL_ADDRESS_EXPIRY attribute or there are
+   no IKE SAs between the peers" is shortened to just "The requested
+   address is valid until there are no IKE SAs between the peers."
+
+   In Section 3.15.1, changed "INTERNAL_IP6_NBNS" to unspecified.
+
+   Made [ADDRIPV6] an informative reference instead of a normative
+   reference and updated it.
+
+   Made [PKCS1] a normative reference instead of an informative
+   reference and changed the pointer to RFC 3447.
+
+D.3.  Changes from draft -00 to draft -01
+
+   In Section 1.5, added "request" to first sentence to make it "If an
+   encrypted IKE request packet arrives on port 500 or 4500 with an
+   unrecognized SPI...".
+
+   In Section 3.3, fifth paragraph, upped the number of transforms for
+   AH and ESP by one each to account for ESN, which is now mandatory.
+
+   In Section 2.1, added "or equal to" in "The responder MUST remember
+   each response until it receives a request whose sequence number is
+   larger than or equal to the sequence number in the response plus its
+   window size."
+
+   In Section 2.18, removed " Note that this may not work if the new IKE
+   SA's PRF has a fixed key size because the output of the PRF may not
+   be of the correct size." because it is no longer relevant.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 125]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+D.4.  Changes from draft -01 to draft -02
+
+   Many grammatical fixes.
+
+   In Section 1.2, reworded Clarif-4.3 to be clearer.
+
+   In Section 1.3.3, reworded 3.10.1-16393 and Clarif-5.4 to remove
+   redundant text.
+
+   In Section 2.13, replaced text about variable length keys with
+   clearer explanation and requirement on non-HMAC PRFs.  Also added
+   "preferred" to Section 2.14 for the key length, and removed redundant
+   text.
+
+   In Section 2.14, removed the "half and half" description and replaced
+   it with exceptions for RFC4434 and RFC4615.
+
+   Removed the now-redundant "All PRFs used with IKEv2 MUST take
+   variable-sized keys" from Section 2.15.
+
+   In Section 2.15, added "(IKE_SA_INIT response)" after "of the second
+   message" and "(IKE_SA_INIT request)" after "the first message".
+
+   In Section 2.17, simplified because there are no more bundles.  "A
+   single Child SA negotiation may result in multiple security
+   associations.  ESP and AH SAs exist in pairs (one in each
+   direction)." becomes "For ESP and AH, a single Child SA negotiation
+   results in two security associations (one in each direction)."
+
+   In section 3.3, made the example of combinations of algorithms and
+   the contents of the first proposal clearer.
+
+   Added Clarif-4.4 to the end of Section 3.3.2.
+
+   Reordered Section 3.3.5 and added Clarif-7.11.
+
+   Clarified Section 3.3.6 about choosing a single proposal.  Also added
+   second paragraph about transforms not understood, and clarified third
+   paragraph about picking D-H groups.
+
+   Moved 3.10.1-16392 from Section 3.6 to 3.7.
+
+   In Section 3.10, clarified 3.10.1-16394.
+
+   Updated Section 6 to indicate that there is nothing new for IANA in
+   this spec.  Also removed the definition of "Expert Review" from
+   Section 1.6 for the same reason.
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 126]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   In Appendix A, removed "and not commit any state to an exchange until
+   the initiator can be cryptographically authenticated" because that
+   was only true in an earlier version of IKEv2.
+
+D.5.  Changes from draft -02 to draft -03
+
+   In Section 1.3, changed "If the responder rejects the Diffie-Hellman
+   group of the KEi payload, the responder MUST reject the request and
+   indicate its preferred Diffie-Hellman group in the INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD
+   Notification payload." to "If the responder selects a proposal using
+   a different Diffie-Hellman group (other than NONE), the responder
+   MUST reject the request and indicate its preferred Diffie-Hellman
+   group in the INVALID_KE_PAYLOAD Notification payload.
+
+   In Section 2.3, added the last two paragraphs covering why you
+   initiator's SPI and/or IP to differentiate if this is a "half-open"
+   IKE SA or a new request.  Also removed similar text from Section 2.2.
+
+   In Section 2.5, added "Payloads sent in IKE response messages MUST
+   NOT have the critical flag set.  Note that the critical flag applies
+   only to the payload type, not the contents.  If the payload type is
+   recognized, but the payload contains something which is not (such as
+   an unknown transform inside an SA payload, or an unknown Notify
+   Message Type inside a Notify payload), the critical flag is ignored."
+
+   In Section 2.6, moved the text about {{ 3.10.1-16390 }} later in the
+   section.  Also reworded the text to make it clearer what the COOKIE
+   is for.
+
+   Moved text from {{ Clarif-2.1 }} from Section 2.6 to Section 2.7.
+
+   In Section 2.13, added "(see Section 3.3.5 for the defintion of the
+   Key Length transform attribute)".
+
+   In Section 2.17, change the description of the keying material from
+   the list with two bullets to a clearer list.
+
+   In Section 2.23, added "Implementations MUST process received UDP-
+   encapsulated ESP packets even when no NAT was detected."
+
+   In Section 3.3, changed "Each proposal may contain a" to "Each
+   proposal contains a".
+
+   Added the asterisks to the transform type table in Section 3.3.2 and
+   the types table in 3.3.3 to foreshadow future developments.
+
+   In Section 3.3.2, changed the following algorithms to (UNSPECIFIED)
+   because the RFCs listed didn't really specify how to implement them
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 127]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   in an interoperable fashion:
+
+   Encryption Algorithms
+   ENCR_DES_IV64        1           (RFC1827)
+   ENCR_3IDEA           8           (RFC2451)
+   ENCR_DES_IV32        9
+   Pseudo-random Functions
+   PRF_HMAC_TIGER              3         (RFC2104)
+   Integrity Algorithms
+   AUTH_DES_MAC         3
+   AUTH_KPDK_MD5        4        (RFC1826)
+
+   In Section 3.4, added "(other than NONE)" to the second-to-last
+   paragraph.
+
+   Rewrote the third paragraph of Section 3.14 to talk about other
+   modes, and to clarify which encryption and integrity protection we
+   are talking about.
+
+   Changed the "Initialization Vector" bullet in Section 3.14 to specify
+   better what is needed for the IV.  Upgraded the SHOULDs to MUSTs.
+   Also added the reference for [MODES].
+
+   In Section 5, in the second-to-last paragraph, changed "a public-key-
+   based" to "strong" to match the wording in Section 2.16.
+
+D.6.  Changes from draft -03 to draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-00
+
+   Changed the document's filename to draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-00.
+   Added Yoav Nir as a co-author.
+
+   In many places in the document, changed "and/or" to "or" when talking
+   about combinations of ESP and AH SAs.  For example, in the intro, it
+   said "can be used to efficiently establish SAs for Encapsulating
+   Security Payload (ESP) and/or Authentication Header (AH)".  This is
+   changed to "or" to indicate that you can only establish one type of
+   SA at a time.
+
+   In Section 1, clarified that RFC 4306 already replaced IKEv1, and
+   that this document replaces RFC 4306.  Also fixed Section 2.5 for
+   similar issue.  Also updated the Abstract to cover this.
+
+   In Section 2.15, in the responder's signed octets, changed:
+
+   RestOfRespIDPayload = IDType | RESERVED | InitIDData
+       to
+   RestOfRespIDPayload = IDType | RESERVED | RespIDData
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 128]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   In 2.16, changed "strong" back to "public key signature based" to
+   make it the same as 4306.
+
+   In section 3.10, added "and the field must be empty" to make it clear
+   that a zero-length SPI is really empty.
+
+D.7.  Changes from draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-00 to
+      draft-ietf-ipsecme-ikev2bis-01
+
+   Throughout, changed "IKE_SA" to "IKE SA", and changed "CHILD_SA" to
+   "Child SA" (except left "CREATE_CHILD_SA" alone).
+
+   Added the middle sentence in the Abstract to say what IKE actually
+   does.
+
+   Added in section 1 "(unless there is failure setting up the AH or ESP
+   Child SA, in which case the IKE SA is still established without IPsec
+   SA)".
+
+   Clarified the titles of 1.1.1, 1.1.2, and 1.1.3.
+
+   In 1.1.2, changed "If there is an inner IP header, the inner
+   addresses will be the same as the outer addresses." because we are
+   talking about transport mode here.
+
+   Added reference to section 2.14 to setion 1.2 and 1.3.
+
+   In 1.2, clarified what is and isn't encrypted in a message.
+
+   Added the following to 1.2: "If the IDr proposed by the initiator is
+   not acceptable to the responder, the responder might use some other
+   IDr to finish the exchange.  If the initiator then does not accept
+   that fact that responder used different IDr than the one that was
+   requested, the initiator can close the SA after noticing the fact."
+
+   Moved the paragraph beginning "All messages following..." from 1.3 up
+   to 1.2, and reworded it to apply to all the cases it covers.
+
+   At the end of section 1.3.1, clarified that the responder is the one
+   who controls whether non-first-fragments will be sent, and reworded
+   the paragraph.
+
+   In section 1.3.3, added "The Protocol ID field of the REKEY_SA
+   notification is set to match the protocol of the SA we are rekeying,
+   for example, 3 for ESP and 2 for AH."  [Issue #10]
+
+   In 1.3.2, added "of the SA payload" to "New initiator and responder
+   SPIs are supplied in the SPI fields."
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 129]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   In 1.3.3, fixed the art.
+
+                                <--  HDR, SK {SA, Nr, [KEr],
+                                         Si, TSr}
+   becomes
+                                <--  HDR, SK {SA, Nr, [KEr],
+                                         TSi, TSr}
+
+
+   In 1.4 and 2.18, changed "replaced for the purpose of rekeying" to
+   "rekeyed".
+
+   Split out the SA deletion material from section 1.4 into its own
+   subsection, 1.4.1.
+
+   Clarified which bits are set at the end of Section 1.5.
+
+   In 1.7, added "That is, the version number is *not* changed from RFC
+   4306.".
+
+   In 2.1, added wording about retransmissions needing to be identical.
+
+   In 2.2, added "or rekeyed" to "In the unlikely event that Message IDs
+   grow too large to fit in 32 bits, the IKE SA MUST be closed"
+
+   In 2.2, moved the sentence "Rekeying an IKE SA resets the sequence
+   numbers." up higher so it would be more likely to be seen.  [Issue
+   #15]
+
+   Moved the definition of "original initiator" from 2.8 into 2.2
+   because that is where it is first used.
+
+   In 2.4, added "fresh (i.e., not retransmitted)" to "If a
+   cryptographically protected message has been received from the other
+   side recently".  Also added the sentence saying that liveness checks
+   are sometimes call dead peer detection.
+
+   Removed the question to implementers about payload order in 2.5.
+
+   Changed the title of 2.6 to "IKE SA SPIs and Cookies".  Also, in the
+   paragraph that describes how to implement the responder, changed the
+   lower-case "should" to "can" to emphasize that this is a choice.
+
+   Added the second paragraph in 2.6 to make it clear that the SPI is
+   used for mapping.
+
+   In section 2.6, upgraded "needs to choose them so as to be unique
+   identifiers of an IKE_SA" to a MUST.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 130]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Added sentences at the end of 2.6 eplaining wny the initiator should
+   limit the number of responses it sends out.
+
+   In 2.6.1, added the example of the shorter exchange; this is copied
+   from RFC 4718 but was dropped in early drafts of this document.
+
+   Added the paragraph to 2.7 that describes needing two proposals if
+   you are having both normal ciphers and combined-mode ciphers.  [Issue
+   #20].
+
+   In section 2.8, added "Note that, when rekeying, the new Child SA MAY
+   have different traffic selectors and algorithms than the old one."
+
+   Added a note in 2.9 that PFKEY applies only to IKEv1.  Also added
+   that unknown traffic selector types are not returned in narrowed
+   responses.
+
+   Added note in the first paragraph of Setion 2.9.1 about decorrelated
+   policies preventing the problem mentioned.
+
+   In 2.12, removed "In particular, it MUST forget the secrets used in
+   the Diffie-Hellman calculation and any state that may persist in the
+   state of a pseudo-random number generator that could be used to
+   recompute the Diffie-Hellman secrets."
+
+   In 2.15, noted that the retry could happen multiple times for
+   different reasons.
+
+   In section 2.16, changed "This shared key generated during an IKE
+   exchange" to "This key".
+
+   At the end of 2.19, added statement that FAILED_CP_REQUIRED is not
+   fatal to the IKE SA.
+
+   Added the reference to ROHCV2 to the end of 2.22.
+
+   In 2.23, changed "can negotiate" to "will use". for UDP
+   encapsulation.  Added "or 4500" to "...MUST be sent from and to UDP
+   port 500".  Also removed the text about why not to do NAT-traversal
+   over port 500 because we later say you can't do that anyway.  [Issue
+   #27] Also removed the last paragraph, which obliquely pointed to
+   MOBIKE.  More will be added later on MOBIKE.
+
+   In 3.1, removed "and orderings of messages" from "Exchange type".
+   [Issue #29]
+
+   In 3.1, added "This bit changes to reflect who initiated the last
+   rekey of the IKE SA." to the description of the Initiator bit.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 131]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   In 3.3, added a long example of why you might use a Proposal
+   structure because of combined-mode algorithms.  [Issue #42]
+
+   In 3.3.2, changed "is unnecessary because the last Proposal could be
+   identified from the length of the SA" to "is unnecessary because the
+   last transform could be identified from the length of the proposal."
+
+   Added reference to AEAD to 3.3.2 and 3.3.3.
+
+   Added the reference to RFC 2104 back for PRF_HMAC_TIGER in 3.3.2.
+   [Issue #33]
+
+   Added note at the bottom of 3.3.2 to see the IANA registry.
+
+   In 3.3.4, removed all the "this could happen in the future" stuff
+   because it already happened.
+
+   Added a reference to email address internationalization to 3.5,
+   making the address binary (not ASCII).
+
+   In the table in 3.6, made "Authority Revocation List (ARL) 8" and
+   "X.509 Certificate - Attribute 10" unspecified.
+
+   In 3.7, changed the last sentence of the first paragraph to eliminate
+   the non-protocol SHOULD.
+
+   In 3.13.1, added "(including protocol 0)" for the start port and end
+   port.
+
+   In 3.14, updated the discussion of initialization modes to reflect
+   that it is only about CBC, and that other specs have to specify their
+   own IVs.
+
+   In 3.15.1, added a pointer to 3.15.3.  In the entries for
+   INTERNAL_IP4_SUBNET and INTERNAL_IP6_SUBNET, added a pointer to
+   3.15.2.
+
+   In 3.15.4, added "The IKE SA is still created even if the initial
+   Child SA cannot be created because of this failure."
+
+   Changed "EAP exchange" to "EAP authentication" in 5.
+
+   Removed "In particular, these exponents MUST NOT be derived from
+   long-lived secrets like the seed to a pseudo-random generator that is
+   not erased after use." from section 5 because it is not possible in
+   most implementations to do so.
+
+   Updated a bunch of reference to their newer versions.
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 132]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+   Added "[V+]" to the end of the exchanges in C.4 and C.5.
+
+   Added two more response templates to Appendix C.1.  Added another
+   response template in Appendix C.2.  Added two more responses in
+   Appendix C.4.
+
+
+Authors' Addresses
+
+   Charlie Kaufman
+   Microsoft
+   1 Microsoft Way
+   Redmond, WA  98052
+   US
+
+   Phone: 1-425-707-3335
+   Email: charliek@microsoft.com
+
+
+   Paul Hoffman
+   VPN Consortium
+   127 Segre Place
+   Santa Cruz, CA  95060
+   US
+
+   Phone: 1-831-426-9827
+   Email: paul.hoffman@vpnc.org
+
+
+   Yoav Nir
+   Check Point Software Technologies Ltd.
+   5 Hasolelim St.
+   Tel Aviv 67897
+   Israel
+
+   Email: ynir@checkpoint.com
+
+
+   Pasi Eronen
+   Nokia Research Center
+   P.O. Box 407
+   FIN-00045 Nokia Group
+   Finland
+
+   Email: pasi.eronen@nokia.com
+
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 133]
+\f
+Internet-Draft                  IKEv2bis                    October 2008
+
+
+Full Copyright Statement
+
+   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2008).
+
+   This document is subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions
+   contained in BCP 78, and except as set forth therein, the authors
+   retain all their rights.
+
+   This document and the information contained herein are provided on an
+   "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE REPRESENTS
+   OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY, THE IETF TRUST AND
+   THE INTERNET ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS
+   OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF
+   THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED
+   WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
+
+
+Intellectual Property
+
+   The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any
+   Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed to
+   pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in
+   this document or the extent to which any license under such rights
+   might or might not be available; nor does it represent that it has
+   made any independent effort to identify any such rights.  Information
+   on the procedures with respect to rights in RFC documents can be
+   found in BCP 78 and BCP 79.
+
+   Copies of IPR disclosures made to the IETF Secretariat and any
+   assurances of licenses to be made available, or the result of an
+   attempt made to obtain a general license or permission for the use of
+   such proprietary rights by implementers or users of this
+   specification can be obtained from the IETF on-line IPR repository at
+   http://www.ietf.org/ipr.
+
+   The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any
+   copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary
+   rights that may cover technology that may be required to implement
+   this standard.  Please address the information to the IETF at
+   ietf-ipr@ietf.org.
+
+
+Acknowledgment
+
+   Funding for the RFC Editor function is provided by the IETF
+   Administrative Support Activity (IASA).
+
+
+
+
+
+Kaufman, et al.            Expires May 3, 2009                [Page 134]
+\f