Added imc-hcd attributes to strongswan.conf
[strongswan.git] / conf / strongswan.conf.5.head.in
1 .TH STRONGSWAN.CONF 5 "" "@PACKAGE_VERSION@" "strongSwan"
2 .SH NAME
3 strongswan.conf \- strongSwan configuration file
4 .SH DESCRIPTION
5 While the
6 .IR ipsec.conf (5)
7 configuration file is well suited to define IPsec related configuration
8 parameters, it is not useful for other strongSwan applications to read options
9 from this file.
10 The file is hard to parse and only
11 .I ipsec starter
12 is capable of doing so. As the number of components of the strongSwan project
13 is continually growing, a more flexible configuration file was needed, one that
14 is easy to extend and can be used by all components. With strongSwan 4.2.1
15 .IR strongswan.conf (5)
16 was introduced which meets these requirements.
17
18 .SH SYNTAX
19 The format of the strongswan.conf file consists of hierarchical
20 .B sections
21 and a list of
22 .B key/value pairs
23 in each section. Each section has a name, followed by C-Style curly brackets
24 defining the section body. Each section body contains a set of subsections
25 and key/value pairs:
26 .PP
27 .EX
28         settings := (section|keyvalue)*
29         section  := name { settings }
30         keyvalue := key = value\\n
31 .EE
32 .PP
33 Values must be terminated by a newline.
34 .PP
35 Comments are possible using the \fB#\fP-character, but be careful: The parser
36 implementation is currently limited and does not like brackets in comments.
37 .PP
38 Section names and keys may contain any printable character except:
39 .PP
40 .EX
41         . { } # \\n \\t space
42 .EE
43 .PP
44 An example file in this format might look like this:
45 .PP
46 .EX
47         a = b
48         section-one {
49                 somevalue = asdf
50                 subsection {
51                         othervalue = xxx
52                 }
53                 # yei, a comment
54                 yetanother = zz
55         }
56         section-two {
57                 x = 12
58         }
59 .EE
60 .PP
61 Indentation is optional, you may use tabs or spaces.
62
63 .SH INCLUDING FILES
64 Using the
65 .B include
66 statement it is possible to include other files into strongswan.conf, e.g.
67 .PP
68 .EX
69         include /some/path/*.conf
70 .EE
71 .PP
72 If the file name is not an absolute path, it is considered to be relative
73 to the directory of the file containing the include statement. The file name
74 may include shell wildcards (see
75 .IR sh (1)).
76 Also, such inclusions can be nested.
77 .PP
78 Sections loaded from included files
79 .I extend
80 previously loaded sections; already existing values are
81 .IR replaced .
82 It is important to note that settings are added relative to the section the
83 include statement is in.
84 .PP
85 As an example, the following three files result in the same final
86 config as the one given above:
87 .PP
88 .EX
89         a = b
90         section-one {
91                 somevalue = before include
92                 include include.conf
93         }
94         include other.conf
95
96 include.conf:
97         # settings loaded from this file are added to section-one
98         # the following replaces the previous value
99         somevalue = asdf
100         subsection {
101                 othervalue = yyy
102         }
103         yetanother = zz
104
105 other.conf:
106         # this extends section-one and subsection
107         section-one {
108                 subsection {
109                         # this replaces the previous value
110                         othervalue = xxx
111                 }
112         }
113         section-two {
114                 x = 12
115         }
116 .EE
117
118 .SH READING VALUES
119 Values are accessed using a dot-separated section list and a key.
120 With reference to the example above, accessing
121 .B section-one.subsection.othervalue
122 will return
123 .BR xxx .
124
125 .SH DEFINED KEYS
126 The following keys are currently defined (using dot notation). The default
127 value (if any) is listed in brackets after the key.