testing: Add scenarios that use XFRM interfaces
[strongswan.git] / README.md
1 # strongSwan Configuration #
2
3 ## Overview ##
4
5 strongSwan is an OpenSource IPsec-based VPN solution.
6
7 This document is just a short introduction of the strongSwan **swanctl** command
8 which uses the modern [**vici**](src/libcharon/plugins/vici/README.md) *Versatile
9 IKE Configuration Interface*. The deprecated **ipsec** command using the legacy
10 **stroke** configuration interface is described [**here**](README_LEGACY.md).
11 For more detailed information consult the man pages and
12 [**our wiki**](https://wiki.strongswan.org).
13
14
15 ## Quickstart ##
16
17 Certificates for users, hosts and gateways are issued by a fictitious
18 strongSwan CA. In our example scenarios the CA certificate `strongswanCert.pem`
19 must be present on all VPN endpoints in order to be able to authenticate the
20 peers. For your particular VPN application you can either use certificates from
21 any third-party CA or generate the needed private keys and certificates yourself
22 with the strongSwan **pki** tool, the use of which will be explained in one of
23 the sections following below.
24
25
26 ### Site-to-Site Case ###
27
28 In this scenario two security gateways _moon_ and _sun_ will connect the
29 two subnets _moon-net_ and _sun-net_ with each other through a VPN tunnel
30 set up between the two gateways:
31
32     10.1.0.0/16 -- | 192.168.0.1 | === | 192.168.0.2 | -- 10.2.0.0/16
33       moon-net          moon                 sun           sun-net
34
35 Configuration on gateway _moon_:
36
37     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
38     /etc/swanctl/x509/moonCert.pem
39     /etc/swanctl/private/moonKey.pem
40
41     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
42
43         connections {
44             net-net {
45                 remote_addrs = 192.168.0.2
46
47                 local {
48                     auth = pubkey
49                     certs = moonCert.pem
50                 }
51                 remote {
52                     auth = pubkey
53                     id = "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=sun.strongswan.org"
54                 }
55                 children {
56                     net-net {
57                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
58                         remote_ts = 10.2.0.0/16
59                         start_action = trap
60                     }
61                 }
62             }
63         }
64
65 Configuration on gateway _sun_:
66
67     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
68     /etc/swanctl/x509/sunCert.pem
69     /etc/swanctl/private/sunKey.pem
70
71     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
72
73         connections {
74             net-net {
75                 remote_addrs = 192.168.0.1
76
77                 local {
78                     auth = pubkey
79                     certs = sunCert.pem
80                 }
81                 remote {
82                     auth = pubkey
83                     id = "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=moon.strongswan.org"
84                 }
85                 children {
86                     net-net {
87                         local_ts  = 10.2.0.0/16
88                         remote_ts = 10.1.0.0/16
89                         start_action = trap
90                     }
91                 }
92             }
93         }
94
95 The local and remote identities used in this scenario are the
96 *subjectDistinguishedNames* contained in the end entity certificates.
97 The certificates and private keys are loaded into the **charon** daemon with
98 the command
99
100     swanctl --load-creds
101
102 whereas
103
104     swanctl --load-conns
105
106 loads the connections defined in `swanctl.conf`. With `start_action = trap` the
107 IPsec connection is automatically set up with the first plaintext payload IP
108 packet wanting to go through the tunnel.
109
110 ### Host-to-Host Case ###
111
112 This is a setup between two single hosts which don't have a subnet behind
113 them.  Although IPsec transport mode would be sufficient for host-to-host
114 connections we will use the default IPsec tunnel mode.
115
116     | 192.168.0.1 | === | 192.168.0.2 |
117          moon                sun
118
119 Configuration on host _moon_:
120
121     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
122     /etc/swanctl/x509/moonCert.pem
123     /etc/swanctl/private/moonKey.pem
124
125     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
126
127         connections {
128             host-host {
129                 remote_addrs = 192.168.0.2
130
131                 local {
132                     auth=pubkey
133                     certs = moonCert.pem
134                 }
135                 remote {
136                     auth = pubkey
137                     id = "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=sun.strongswan.org"
138                 }
139                 children {
140                     net-net {
141                         start_action = trap
142                     }
143                 }
144             }
145         }
146
147 Configuration on host _sun_:
148
149     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
150     /etc/swanctl/x509/sunCert.pem
151     /etc/swanctl/private/sunKey.pem
152
153     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
154
155         connections {
156             host-host {
157                 remote_addrs = 192.168.0.1
158
159                 local {
160                     auth = pubkey
161                     certs = sunCert.pem
162                 }
163                 remote {
164                     auth = pubkey
165                     id = "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=moon.strongswan.org"
166                 }
167                 children {
168                     host-host {
169                         start_action = trap
170                     }
171                 }
172             }
173         }
174
175
176 ### Roadwarrior Case ###
177
178 This is a very common case where a strongSwan gateway serves an arbitrary
179 number of remote VPN clients usually having dynamic IP addresses.
180
181     10.1.0.0/16 -- | 192.168.0.1 | === | x.x.x.x |
182       moon-net          moon              carol
183
184 Configuration on gateway _moon_:
185
186     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
187     /etc/swanctl/x509/moonCert.pem
188     /etc/swanctl/private/moonKey.pem
189
190     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
191
192         connections {
193             rw {
194                 local {
195                     auth = pubkey
196                     certs = moonCert.pem
197                     id = moon.strongswan.org
198                 }
199                 remote {
200                     auth = pubkey
201                 }
202                 children {
203                     net-net {
204                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
205                     }
206                 }
207             }
208         }
209
210 Configuration on roadwarrior _carol_:
211
212     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
213     /etc/swanctl/x509/carolCert.pem
214     /etc/swanctl/private/carolKey.pem
215
216     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
217
218         connections {
219             home {
220                 remote_addrs = moon.strongswan.org
221
222                 local {
223                     auth = pubkey
224                     certs = carolCert.pem
225                     id = carol@strongswan.org
226                 }
227                 remote {
228                     auth = pubkey
229                     id = moon.strongswan.org
230                 }
231                 children {
232                     home {
233                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
234                         start_action = start
235                     }
236                 }
237             }
238         }
239
240 For `remote_addrs` the hostname `moon.strongswan.org` was chosen which will be
241 resolved by DNS at runtime into the corresponding IP destination address.
242 In this scenario the identity of the roadwarrior `carol` is the email address
243 `carol@strongswan.org` which must be included as a *subjectAlternativeName* in
244 the roadwarrior certificate `carolCert.pem`.
245
246
247 ### Roadwarrior Case with Virtual IP ###
248
249 Roadwarriors usually have dynamic IP addresses assigned by the ISP they are
250 currently attached to.  In order to simplify the routing from _moon-net_ back
251 to the remote access client _carol_ it would be desirable if the roadwarrior had
252 an inner IP address chosen from a pre-defined pool.
253
254     10.1.0.0/16 -- | 192.168.0.1 | === | x.x.x.x | -- 10.3.0.1
255       moon-net          moon              carol       virtual IP
256
257 In our example the virtual IP address is chosen from the address pool
258 `10.3.0.0/16` which can be configured by adding the section
259
260     pools {
261         rw_pool {
262             addrs = 10.3.0.0/16
263         }
264     }
265
266 to the gateway's `swanctl.conf` from where they are loaded into the **charon**
267 daemon using the command
268
269     swanctl --load-pools
270
271 To request an IP address from this pool a roadwarrior can use IKEv1 mode config
272 or IKEv2 configuration payloads. The configuration for both is the same
273
274     vips = 0.0.0.0
275
276 Configuration on gateway _moon_:
277
278     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
279     /etc/swanctl/x509/moonCert.pem
280     /etc/swanctl/private/moonKey.pem
281
282     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
283
284         connections {
285             rw {
286                 pools = rw_pool
287
288                 local {
289                     auth = pubkey
290                     certs = moonCert.pem
291                     id = moon.strongswan.org
292                 }
293                 remote {
294                     auth = pubkey
295                 }
296                 children {
297                     net-net {
298                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
299                     }
300                 }
301             }
302         }
303
304         pools {
305             rw_pool {
306                 addrs = 10.30.0.0/16
307             }
308         }
309
310 Configuration on roadwarrior _carol_:
311
312     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
313     /etc/swanctl/x509/carolCert.pem
314     /etc/swanctl/private/carolKey.pem
315
316     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
317
318         connections {
319             home {
320                 remote_addrs = moon.strongswan.org
321                 vips = 0.0.0.0
322
323                 local {
324                     auth = pubkey
325                     certs = carolCert.pem
326                     id = carol@strongswan.org
327                 }
328                 remote {
329                     auth = pubkey
330                     id = moon.strongswan.org
331                 }
332                 children {
333                     home {
334                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
335                         start_action = start
336                     }
337                 }
338             }
339         }
340
341
342 ### Roadwarrior Case with EAP Authentication ###
343
344 This is a very common case where a strongSwan gateway serves an arbitrary
345 number of remote VPN clients which authenticate themselves via a password
346 based *Extended Authentication Protocol* as e.g. *EAP-MD5* or *EAP-MSCHAPv2*.
347
348     10.1.0.0/16 -- | 192.168.0.1 | === | x.x.x.x |
349       moon-net          moon              carol
350
351 Configuration on gateway _moon_:
352
353     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
354     /etc/swanctl/x509/moonCert.pem
355     /etc/swanctl/private/moonKey.pem
356
357     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
358
359         connections {
360             rw {
361                 local {
362                     auth = pubkey
363                     certs = moonCert.pem
364                     id = moon.strongswan.org
365                 }
366                 remote {
367                     auth = eap-md5
368                 }
369                 children {
370                     net-net {
371                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
372                     }
373                 }
374                 send_certreq = no
375             }
376         }
377
378 The  `swanctl.conf` file additionally contains a `secrets` section defining all
379 client credentials
380
381         secrets {
382             eap-carol {
383                 id = carol@strongswan.org
384                 secret = Ar3etTnp
385             }
386             eap-dave {
387                 id = dave@strongswan.org
388                 secret = W7R0g3do
389             }
390         }
391
392 Configuration on roadwarrior _carol_:
393
394     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
395
396     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
397
398         connections {
399             home {
400                 remote_addrs = moon.strongswan.org
401
402                 local {
403                     auth = eap
404                     id = carol@strongswan.org
405                 }
406                 remote {
407                     auth = pubkey
408                     id = moon.strongswan.org
409                 }
410                 children {
411                     home {
412                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
413                         start_action = start
414                     }
415                 }
416             }
417         }
418
419         secrets {
420             eap-carol {
421                 id = carol@strongswan.org
422                 secret = Ar3etTnp
423             }
424         }
425
426
427 ### Roadwarrior Case with EAP Identity ###
428
429 Often a client EAP identity is exchanged via EAP which differs from the
430 external IKEv2 identity. In this example the IKEv2 identity defaults to
431 the IPv4 address of the client.
432
433     10.1.0.0/16 -- | 192.168.0.1 | === | x.x.x.x |
434       moon-net          moon              carol
435
436 Configuration on gateway _moon_:
437
438     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
439     /etc/swanctl/x509/moonCert.pem
440     /etc/swanctl/private/moonKey.pem
441
442     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
443
444         connections {
445             rw {
446                 local {
447                     auth = pubkey
448                     certs = moonCert.pem
449                     id = moon.strongswan.org
450                 }
451                 remote {
452                     auth = eap-md5
453                     eap_id = %any
454                 }
455                 children {
456                     net-net {
457                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
458                     }
459                 }
460                 send_certreq = no
461             }
462         }
463
464         secrets {
465             eap-carol {
466                 id = carol
467                 secret = Ar3etTnp
468             }
469             eap-dave {
470                 id = dave
471                 secret = W7R0g3do
472             }
473         }
474
475 Configuration on roadwarrior _carol_:
476
477     /etc/swanctl/x509ca/strongswanCert.pem
478
479     /etc/swanctl/swanctl.conf:
480
481         connections {
482             home {
483                 remote_addrs = moon.strongswan.org
484
485                 local {
486                     auth = eap
487                     eap_id = carol
488                 }
489                 remote {
490                     auth = pubkey
491                     id = moon.strongswan.org
492                 }
493                 children {
494                     home {
495                         local_ts  = 10.1.0.0/16
496                         start_action = start
497                     }
498                 }
499             }
500         }
501
502         secrets {
503             eap-carol {
504                 id = carol
505                 secret = Ar3etTnp
506             }
507         }
508
509
510 ## Generating Certificates and CRLs ##
511
512 This section is not a full-blown tutorial on how to use the strongSwan **pki**
513 tool. It just lists a few points that are relevant if you want to generate your
514 own certificates and CRLs for use with strongSwan.
515
516
517 ### Generating a CA Certificate ###
518
519 The pki statement
520
521     pki --gen --type ed25519 --outform pem > strongswanKey.pem
522
523 generates an elliptic Edwards-Curve key with a cryptographic strength of 128
524 bits. The corresponding public key is packed into a self-signed CA certificate
525 with a lifetime of 10 years (3652 days)
526
527     pki --self --ca --lifetime 3652 --in strongswanKey.pem \
528                --dn "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=strongSwan Root CA" \
529                --outform pem > strongswanCert.pem
530
531 which can be listed with the command
532
533     pki --print --in strongswanCert.pem
534
535     subject:  "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=strongSwan Root CA"
536     issuer:   "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=strongSwan Root CA"
537     validity:  not before May 18 08:32:06 2017, ok
538                not after  May 18 08:32:06 2027, ok (expires in 3651 days)
539     serial:    57:e0:6b:3a:9a:eb:c6:e0
540     flags:     CA CRLSign self-signed
541     subjkeyId: 2b:95:14:5b:c3:22:87:de:d1:42:91:88:63:b3:d5:c1:92:7a:0f:5d
542     pubkey:    ED25519 256 bits
543     keyid:     a7:e1:6a:3f:e7:6f:08:9d:89:ec:23:92:a9:a1:14:3c:78:a8:7a:f7
544     subjkey:   2b:95:14:5b:c3:22:87:de:d1:42:91:88:63:b3:d5:c1:92:7a:0f:5d
545
546 If you prefer the CA private key and X.509 certificate to be in binary DER format
547 then just omit the `--outform pem` option. The directory `/etc/swanctl/x509ca`
548 contains all required CA certificates either in binary DER or in Base64 PEM
549 format. Irrespective of the file suffix the correct format will be determined
550 by strongSwan automagically.
551
552
553 ### Generating a Host or User End Entity Certificate ###
554
555 Again we are using the command
556
557     pki --gen --type ed25519 --outform pem > moonKey.pem
558
559 to generate an Ed25519 private key for the host `moon`. Alternatively you could
560 type
561
562     pki --gen --type rsa --size 3072 > moonKey.der
563
564 to generate a traditional 3072 bit RSA key and store it in binary DER format.
565 As an alternative a **TPM 2.0** *Trusted Platform Module* available on every
566 recent Intel platform could be used as a virtual smartcard to securely store an
567 RSA or ECDSA private key. For details, refer to the TPM 2.0
568 [HOWTO](https://wiki.strongswan.org/projects/strongswan/wiki/TpmPlugin).
569
570 In a next step the command
571
572     pki --req --type priv --in moonKey.pem \
573               --dn "C=CH, O=strongswan, CN=moon.strongswan.org \
574               --san moon.strongswan.org --outform pem > moonReq.pem
575
576 creates a PKCS#10 certificate request that has to be signed by the CA.
577 Through the [multiple] use of the `--san` parameter any number of desired
578 *subjectAlternativeNames* can be added to the request. These can be of the
579 form
580
581     --san sun.strongswan.org     # fully qualified host name
582     --san carol@strongswan.org   # RFC822 user email address
583     --san 192.168.0.1            # IPv4 address
584     --san fec0::1                # IPv6 address
585
586 Based on the certificate request the CA issues a signed end entity certificate
587 with the following command
588
589     pki --issue --cacert strongswanCert.pem --cakey strongswanKey.pem \
590                 --type pkcs10 --in moonReq.pem --serial 01 --lifetime 1826 \
591                 --outform pem > moonCert.pem
592
593 If the `--serial` parameter with a hexadecimal argument is omitted then a random
594 serial number is generated. Some third party VPN clients require that a VPN
595 gateway certificate contains the *TLS Server Authentication* Extended Key Usage
596 (EKU) flag which can be included with the following option
597
598     --flag serverAuth
599
600 If you want to use the dynamic CRL fetching feature described in one of the
601 following sections then you may include one or several *crlDistributionPoints*
602 in your end entity certificates using the `--crl` parameter
603
604     --crl  http://crl.strongswan.org/strongswan.crl
605     --crl "ldap://ldap.strongswan.org/cn=strongSwan Root CA, o=strongSwan,c=CH?certificateRevocationList"
606
607 The issued host certificate can be listed with
608
609     pki --print --in moonCert.pem
610
611     subject:  "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=moon.strongswan.org"
612     issuer:   "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=strongSwan Root CA"
613     validity:  not before May 19 10:28:19 2017, ok
614                not after  May 19 10:28:19 2022, ok (expires in 1825 days)
615     serial:    01
616     altNames:  moon.strongswan.org
617     flags:     serverAuth
618     CRL URIs:  http://crl.strongswan.org/strongswan.crl
619     authkeyId: 2b:95:14:5b:c3:22:87:de:d1:42:91:88:63:b3:d5:c1:92:7a:0f:5d
620     subjkeyId: 60:9d:de:30:a6:ca:b9:8e:87:bb:33:23:61:19:18:b8:c4:7e:23:8f
621     pubkey:    ED25519 256 bits
622     keyid:     39:1b:b3:c2:34:72:1a:01:08:40:ce:97:75:b8:be:ce:24:30:26:29
623     subjkey:   60:9d:de:30:a6:ca:b9:8e:87:bb:33:23:61:19:18:b8:c4:7e:23:8f
624
625 Usually, a Windows, OSX, Android or iOS based VPN client needs its private key,
626 its host or user certificate and the CA certificate.  The most convenient way
627 to load this information is to put everything into a PKCS#12 container:
628
629     openssl pkcs12 -export -inkey carolKey.pem \
630                    -in carolCert.pem -name "carol" \
631                    -certfile strongswanCert.pem -caname "strongSwan Root CA" \
632                    -out carolCert.p12
633
634 The strongSwan **pki** tool currently is not able to create PKCS#12 containers
635 so that **openssl** must be used.
636
637
638 ### Generating a CRL ###
639
640 An empty CRL that is signed by the CA can be generated with the command
641
642     pki --signcrl --cacert strongswanCert.pem --cakey strongswanKey.pem \
643                   --lifetime 30 > strongswan.crl
644
645 If you omit the `--lifetime` option then the default value of 15 days is used.
646 CRLs can either be uploaded to a HTTP or LDAP server or put in binary DER or
647 Base64 PEM format into the `/etc/swanctl/x509crl` directory from where they are
648 loaded into the **charon** daemon with the command
649
650     swanctl --load-creds
651
652
653 ### Revoking a Certificate ###
654
655 A specific end entity certificate is revoked with the command
656
657     pki --signcrl --cacert strongswanCert.pem --cakey strongswanKey.pem \
658                   --lifetime 30 --lastcrl strongswan.crl \
659                   --reason key-compromise --cert moonCert.pem > new.crl
660
661 Instead of the certificate file (in our example moonCert.pem), the serial number
662 of the certificate to be revoked can be indicated using the `--serial`
663 parameter. The `pki --signcrl --help` command documents all possible revocation
664 reasons but the `--reason` parameter can also be omitted. The content of the new
665 CRL file can be listed with the command
666
667     pki --print --type crl --in new.crl
668
669     issuer:   "C=CH, O=strongSwan, CN=strongSwan Root CA"
670     update:    this on May 19 11:13:01 2017, ok
671                next on Jun 18 11:13:01 2017, ok (expires in 29 days)
672     serial:    02
673     authKeyId: 2b:95:14:5b:c3:22:87:de:d1:42:91:88:63:b3:d5:c1:92:7a:0f:5d
674     1 revoked certificate:
675       01: May 19 11:13:01 2017, key compromise
676
677
678 ### Local Caching of CRLs ###
679
680 The `strongswan.conf` option
681
682     charon {
683         cache_crls = yes
684     }
685
686 activates the local caching of CRLs that were dynamically fetched from an
687 HTTP or LDAP server.  Cached copies are stored in `/etc/swanctl/x509crl` using a
688 unique filename formed from the issuer's *subjectKeyIdentifier* and the
689 suffix `.crl`.
690
691 With the cached copy the CRL is immediately available after startup.  When the
692 local copy has become stale, an updated CRL is automatically fetched from one of
693 the defined CRL distribution points during the next IKEv2 authentication.